ConceptEuropeLumen prints by Žilvinas Kropas, Aušra Kropienė & Mėta Kropaitė

The photography of the 21st century is still able to surprise us. The mass of images that land on our screens every day is so enormous that twenty-four hours would probably not be enough to count them.
17557 min

The photography of the 21st century is still able to surprise us. The mass of images that land on our screens every day is so enormous that twenty-four hours would probably not be enough to count them.

We live not so much in the excess of images but in their constant storm. We are not even allowed to take a breath from them, to create image-free shelters for ourselves or build indestructible fortifications. So how are we supposed to perceive reality, to say nothing of living in the visual apocalypse of our day?

Mėta Kropaitė

On the one hand, today’s mass media engulfs us into rituals of insatiable consumption (when spending hours on Instagram, Facebook, or pointlessly browsing news portals we are being forced to re-identify with the grimaces of reality popping up in the stream of images); on the other hand, by finding ourselves in an intense visual flow, we at the same time become hostages to the dilemma – i.e. we are pressed to decide fairly quickly which image we shall pay our attention to and how much of it (the resolving of this dilemma also depends on our aesthetic taste). The dilemma is a challenge to every artist as well, for they must develop a unique artistic language with much more care, patience, and subtlety, striving for public attention and taking root in the continually accelerating image culture.

Žilvinas Kropas

Some artists, however, do not seek to strictly follow the fashions of visual culture while competing on the common visual-informational highway. Like Buddhist monks, they work patiently, concentrating on their every creative gesture. Such artists are quite strong and diligent personalities. Having discovered them in these times of mediocrity the world, entrapped in the continuous flow of images, pauses in awe: is such authenticity still possible? Probably that is why I am still fascinated and continually amazed by the photographer Žilvinas Kropas who lives in Panevėžys. Recently his works have received quite a lot of recognition not only in Lithuania, but also abroad. For many years, the artist has been patiently developing his subtle artistic program and is persistently following his unique artistic path.

Žilvinas Kropas

It may seem that it is the path of the classics. Žilvinas Kropas is looking for an opportunity to capture the rays of the sun in a light-sensitive material and thus record the world in a rather limited print. The images created by the artist appeal to the artistic tradition of pictoriality. Žilvinas Kropas also shows us that no matter how old the creative approaches (old technologies, themes, creative motives, challenges of artistic legitimacy) are, they can still be original and significant against the background of today’s visual noise.

Probably the majority of viewers looking at Kropas’ work always want to ask about how the technology he applies is developed, how one or another imprint of an object found in the everyday world is obtained. In displaying the prints, the artist himself tells us about the depiction of reality, and about the recording of that reality as well. I.e. his visual solutions raise questions of birth, creation, development of language. In this way, the artist seems to interpret the conceptual approach towards writing practiced by Jacques Derrida (1930 – 2004), a representative of French poststructuralist philosophy.

Žilvinas Kropas

In the work of Kropas, the intertextual and intervisual image, imprinted and demonstrated on a flat surface, is equated to writing. The image represents the world, but also emphasizes the target (re)presentation strategy that depends on the historical situation and tradition. Not always easy to remember, rather abstract forms reveal intervisual connections, allowing to liken the process of image creation to the invention of a writing act which tries to find and bring to life previous depictions / writings. As Derrida would say, with this rather complicated creative gesture, the artist moves towards arche-writing (i.e. the nature of the writing itself).

When photography is discussed as writing, then the gesture of photographic creation moves towards writing, which is actualized by Derrida’s works On Grammatology (1967) and Truth in Painting (1978). Consequently, when the parallels between philosophical discourse and photographic imprint open up in explaining the problem of writing as medium and writing as process, when drawing with light (meaning of the term ‘photography’, R. V. note) is compared to writing as process, then it is possible to discuss even the relationship between logos and language and the position of logos in visual culture.

Žilvinas Kropas

The Greek logos stands for reason, the world, and vocally expressed language. The more abstract the drawing with light becomes, the more it tries to withdraw from the zone of violence inherent in logos (reason). Unfortunately, the recognizable shapes in the photos bring us back to language, i.e. the logos sphere of ​​influence. Eventually, it becomes clear that photography is a power game with logos, but not a withdrawal from it. It is this grapple that makes the photography of Kropas a rather interesting phenomenon that raises some doubts about the concept of an image as capable of telling the truth. In the case of Kropas artwork, one gets the impression that the artist has concealed something, that something was left hidden and is still waiting to be discovered and exposed.

This situation is solved through the dialogue of abstract images and forms of reality. Understanding of abstract images is usually lacking or their history is not revealed but concealed. In this case, history is what helps to name the identity of photography. Still, with his images, Žilvinas Kropas encourages disregard for logocentrism and the destruction of the established language of images as a multiple copy of copies – as a language of languages that falsely reveals the world. However, discovering pure references to recognizable forms in abstract images and recognizing the experiences of the tactile and visual worlds briefly activates the logos itself. The artist’s struggle with the traditional forms of portrayal and the pursuit of his unique artistic language has no end and is created as an ever-changing cycle. [Text by Prof. Dr. Remigijus Venckus | Media artist and critic]

Žilvinas-Kropas

Aušra Kropienė

Aušra Kropienė

Žilvinas Kropas

Žilvinas Kropas

Aušra Kropienė

Aušra Kropienė

Aušra Kropienė

Aušra Kropienė

Žilvinas Kropas



Legal Note: The photographer attest that have full authorization to give consent to the publication of these photos or project and have the authorization and permissions of third parties. Guarantees that you have all the necessary communications of property and you have obtained all the necessary authorizations for any property, buildings, architecture, structures or sculptures appearing in your photographs.

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/PH5.jpg

Get instant access to over 120 in-depth tutorials for all skill levels, the ability to stream anywhere from any mobile device, and access to our library.

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/Dodho.jpg
Share your most best images in this photo contest in collaboration with ViewBug. A community that hosts over 40 photo contests and challenges.
300x250

With ON1 Photo RAW you get the professional photo editing tools every photographer needs to get professional results while keeping your workflow.

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Landscape-and-Nature-dPS-Photography-Course-300x250-1.jpg

Landscape & nature photography is one of the most challenging genres and disciplines to learn, and the costs of getting it wrong can be disappointing

Showroom

LOOKING OUT FROM WITHIN

Julia Fullerton-Batten

SEPTEMBER 7 TO OCTOBER 31, 2020

LATEST STORIES
X
stay in touch
Join our mailing list and we'll keep you up to date with all the latest stories, opportunities, calls and more.
We never share your data with 3rd parties. Your details will be held securely, we won't share them with anyone else and of course you may unsubscribe at any time. You can read our Privacy Policy here
We’d love to
Submission
Dodho Magazine accepts submissions from emerging and professional photographers from around the world.
Their projects can be published among the best photographers and be viewed by the best professionals in the industry and thousands of photography enthusiasts. Dodho magazine reserves the right to accept or reject any submitted project. Due to the large number of presentations received daily and the need to treat them with the greatest respect and the time necessary for a correct interpretation our average response time is around 5/10 business days in the case of being accepted.
- Between 10/30 images of your best images, in case your project contains a greater number of images which are part of the same indivisible body of work will also be accepted. You must send the images in jpg format to 1200px and 72dpi and quality 9. (No borders or watermarks)
- A short biography along with your photograph. (It must be written in the third person)
- Title and full text of the project with a minimum length of 300 words. (Texts with lesser number of words will not be accepted)
This is the information you need to start preparing your project for its presentation
To send it, you must compress the folder in .ZIP format and use our Wetransfer channel specially dedicated to the reception of works. Links or projects in PDF format will not be accepted. All presentations are carefully reviewed based on their content and final quality of the project or portfolio. If your work is selected for publication in the online version, it will be communicated to you via email and subsequently it will be published.
Issue #14 | September 2020
Current Issue
Vicky Martin
Ryotaro Horiuchi
Susanne Mildeelberg
Diego Bardone
Nicky Hamilton
Alain Schroeder
Printed on 80# matte paper 22x28cm | 100 Pages
Showroom
September 7 to October 31, 2020
Julia Fullerton-Batten
LOOKING OUT FROM WITHIN