Interview with Nicky Hamilton; published in our print edition #14

There is an extremely voyeuristic character in Nicky Hamilton's works. He is able to introduce us to detailed universes he designs and stages. He lets viewers overhear and have a peek at realistic storylines. His choices and ideas are intriguing and help him to show a whole meaningful narrative.

There is an extremely voyeuristic character in Nicky Hamilton’s works. He is able to introduce us to detailed universes he designs and stages. He lets viewers overhear and have a peek at realistic storylines. His choices and ideas are intriguing and help him to show a whole meaningful narrative.

There is a contradictory quality in the truthful representations he uses and the fact he works with elaborate sets to express symbolism through performance. As Robert Bechtle, the American photorealist painter, Nicky tries to capture the real thing and makes us believe the plot. In the same movement, his works also remind me of Tim Eitel, like in Tim’s painting, his photo-series present reflective characters, we can feel their thinking and emotions. We become the spies as in The Rear Window‘s tradition. [Official Website][Print Edition][Digital edition]

Your work has had great attention and you have become a multi-award winning photographer. In a digitalized world that has become saturated with image, how do you get to the originality state of these unexpected photo-narratives?. And based on your experience, what piece of advice would you tell a new creator that is looking forward to doing something original?

Create work that is meaningful to you, if it’s original you’ll feel the fear, the uncertainty of how the idea will translate. Pre visualizing your idea can really help to test it before you go too far, this can be as basic as a pencil sketch or as in-depth as creating the idea using 3D software, group this pre visual with a lighting mood board and other visual references for the tone, then if it all still feels like a great idea to you then you’ve found something special.

The location for the shooting is always a key aspect for a photographer. Your sets are incredibly amazing, like from the best HBO or Netflix series. Your photos also remind me of Damien Hirst’s creatures. I must congratulate you for the refreshing own voice, far from being a product. How did you get to this decision to create your own universes and where are these coming from? How do you imagine these masterpieces’ stages?

My ideas sometimes sit with me for a number of years. If I keep coming back to the idea and the need to communicate it grows then I’ll develop the tone and how the production would come together. I have a very idiosyncratic approach to photography, I like to build worlds where my ideas sit in, often building the sets by myself, spending appropriate time on each creative decision, obsessing over the details, and dancing along the creative path.

There is a gossiping aspect of a narrator’s voice. In the series Take me Away, we find this traditional Chinese Take Away in Modern Britain. The light, color, and atmosphere are on point, so special and effective. There is a psychological game in each character, even the dog may tell a story. How do you manage to show this introspection? Tell me about how you portray people’s thoughts.

Take me Away is based upon a real-world Chinese takeaway close to my studio. Often on the drive home from work, I would see a guy sitting behind the counter watching TV and waiting for a customer, then on another occasion, a guy would be leaning on the counter reading the newspaper. These simple but powerful moments of waiting patiently caught my attention. I revisited the takeaway many times, making notes on the characters and behaviors that I witnessed, and then followed these findings when casting and directing the talent in my studio on a copy of the Chinese takeaway set that I had built.

There is a sensitive approach to the confinement and the covid pandemic in The Upside Down. The portrayal of your own children, the kid, and the teen, makes this series a very personal work. Like the new documentalists, for instance, Panos & Mary, you recreate reality and present it. These photos are so sincere that they reminded me of Susan Meiselas’s body of work. There is also a cathartic element, like a relief from the recreation. Your children have now become models or participants of the universes you depict. Tell me about this new bond you have established.

The Upside Down is a surreal look at the mental state of my family in lockdown during the Covid-19 pandemic. After just a few weeks in my 8-year-old son, William found it difficult to sleep alone, worrying that the world was going to end and without the daily routine of school, friends, and fun my hormonal teenager became frustrated and angry at us all, missing his girlfriend, playing football and even ‘real’ school work. The sudden change in them both made me see their world in an entirely new light, a world that I needed to portray. It’s an honest reflection of a surreal experience we were all going through as a family.

In The Lonely Man, the sets are complex and different. The aesthetics and atmosphere again are nailed. There is a narrator value in everything you capture. This is a multitask approach to photography, a full creative director job. It seems human relationships always bring some sort of melancholy and sadness in your works. Tell me about the process. How long does it take to capture an image the way you want it to be? are you a patient creator?

The Lonely Man is a reflection of my childhood relationship with my Dad. It took around 3 cathartic years to create, with each picture a recreation of a moment that shaped my early life. It took around 3 months to produce each picture, from the initial concept sketch to building the set, sourcing props, set dressing and styling, to finally lighting, shooting, and post-production. It’s tough to create such an in-depth project over such a long span of time and keeping my patients, there’s an excitement to share the work and also a desire to move on to something new when obsessing overtakes the value of the idea.

There is a striking image in your gallery: Sign of the Times. It seems you wanted to represent the idea of climate change to raise some awareness. There is also a pop art engine there, the consumerism of current society. Tell me about the ideas behind this terrific shot.

Sign of The Times shows us the results of climate change, polarised against the most iconic sign in the world with its ‘still turning on’ status symbolizing the political and economical stance to the near irreversible future that we’re headed for. I wanted to create a simple but striking visual to reflect this and a change in direction to my usual studio work was refreshing too.

Seigar

Seigar is a passionate travel, street, social documentary and conceptual photographer based in Tenerife. He feels obsessed with pop culture that he shows in his series. He is a fetishist for reflections, saturated colors, curious finds and religious icons. He also flirts with journalism and video. His main inspiration is travelling. His aim as an artist is to tell tales with his camera, creating a continuous storyline from his trips. His most ambitious projects so far are his Plastic People, a study on anthropology and sociology that focuses on the humanization of the mannequins he finds in the shop windows all over the world, and his Tales of a City, an ongoing urban photo-narrative project taken in London. He is a philologist and also works as a secondary school teacher. He is a self-taught visual artist, though he has done a two years course in advanced photography and one in cinema and television. He has participated in several exhibitions and his works have been featured in many publications. He has collaborated with different media such as VICE and WAG1. He writes for The Cultural about photography and for Memoir Mixtapes about music. Lately, he has experimented with video forms. His last interest is documenting identity. Recently, he received the Rafael Ramos García International Photography Award.


More Stories

A virtual summer by Thomas H.P. Jerusalem

A virtual summer by Thomas H.P. Jerusalem

A Virtual Summer project was selected and published in our print edition 19. A story about a girl being stuck at home pretending to be on the beach.
Death is a teacher by Srideep Banerjee

Death is a teacher by Srideep Banerjee

It was around 1'O clock when grief crept in with the chilly winds of the Ganges caressing my face. Witnessing death of a near relative isn't always easy to handle.
Salt Making by Ly Hoang Long

Salt Making by Ly Hoang Long

This type of salt production was a low-cost technology that was known and used in shallow coastal regions throughout Southeast Asia.

Call For Entries

We are looking for 6 fantastic photographers
who want to give an incredible impulse to their career.

We are going to put your photographs in front of the eyes of the directors
of the best galleries, festivals and agencies around the world.
Are you coming with us?

DEADLINE | TUESDAY, MAY 31, 2022

PHOTO BY © JULIA FULLERTON-BATTEN
Conceptual photography; Dissection by Kaushik Dolui

Conceptual photography; Dissection by Kaushik Dolui

The physical presence of blood and flesh is felt in nature as well as material substances also. If the skin cover is eliminated from all living beings, what we see? Blood and flesh is visible in the innermost part of every living body.
The specter of life by Marcin Mirosławski

The specter of life by Marcin Mirosławski

It is a metaphorical and allegorical journey through my self, but at the same time it is a universal story through metaphors and symbols, everyone can try to find themselves in these photos.
Polaroid; Crisis of Experience by J. K. Lavin

Polaroid; Crisis of Experience by J. K. Lavin

This body of work originates from a series of Polaroid SX70 self-portraits made during a daily practice from 1979 to late 1987. Crisis of Experience is the result of an eight-year project exploring themes of self-reflection and female identity using the mechanics of seriality.

Featured Stories

architectural photography of Julia Anna Gospodarou

architectural photography of Julia Anna Gospodarou

Architect and International Award-Winning B&W Fine Art Photographer, Julia lives in Athens and has a passion for both architecture and photography, doing them with the same dedication and joy.
Paul Rogers

Paul Rogers

A former Times editorial photographer, Paul Rogers is now a respected wedding photojournalist. His style pays homage to a finely honed journalistic eye that saw him cover assignments in Iraq, Africa and North Korea.
Nude in black and white; Simbiosa by Thomas Bichler

Nude in black and white; Simbiosa by Thomas Bichler

"simbiosa" ... women, rocks, water is my current main project, which gets all my photographic and creative attention and free time.
Nickel by Alexandra Gromova

Nickel by Alexandra Gromova

The town of Nickel was founded in 1935. It used to be called Kolosjoki: Finnish geologists who studied nickel ores used to live and work here.
Alternative family album by Frank Rodick

Alternative family album by Frank Rodick

These images are part of what I’ve called an “alternative family album.” With one exception, I constructed each work using vernacular photographs from archives discovered after my parents’ deaths.
Edelstein’s world by Denis Kaminev

Edelstein’s world by Denis Kaminev

The Church of Resurrection in Karabanovo village (Kostroma oblast), built in 1833, experienced both physical and spiritual destruction in Soviet times, when it was turned into a machinery service station and a fertilizer depot, and was fully re-established under the guidance of a priest by the name of George Edelstein.
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Mono-banner.jpg

We invite you to participate in the first edition of the Monochromatic Awards. We are eager to see photograhs with new focus points and innovative approaches

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/BAnImage.jpg

ImageRights provides intelligent image search and copyright enforcement services to photo agencies and professional photographers worldwide.

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/banner.jpg

The book where words and images meet to never leave each other, The book contains 20 evocative paintings; each of them is a double page. 56 printed pages | 235x165mm

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/call21.jpg

Call For Entries #21 | After 20 editions and more than 100 published photographers, our print edition has proven to be a simply effective promotional channel.

Kazakh eagle hunters & Golden eagle festival by Sanghamitra Sarkar

Kazakh eagle hunters & Golden eagle festival by Sanghamitra Sarkar

The Mongolian eagle hunters are a dying breed. In one estimate there are only fifty or sixty to two hundred and fifty eagle hunters left The golden eagle hunters capture the eaglets at around four months old
Gotham Visions; Second City by Emmanuelle Becker

Gotham Visions; Second City by Emmanuelle Becker

Gotham Visions / Second City is a portfolio of stylish, unsettling urban landscapes, a collection of dark, brooding night scenes shot in seemingly lifeless cities. Emmanuelle Becker’s imagery is cinematic and particularly influenced by American film noir and German expressionist cinema.
A Hindu funerary rite in a Calcuta crematory by Joxe Inazio Kuesta

A Hindu funerary rite in a Calcuta crematory by Joxe Inazio Kuesta

Today we are going to go to a different site that will interest you, which will impress you, Rahul told me. Where? I asked. You'll see, he answered. Rahul was my guide: a boy who slept in the street. And he was right, it was impressive, exciting.
New Orleans to Nashville by Benjamin Angel

New Orleans to Nashville by Benjamin Angel

A large part of modern music is born in the cities located between New Orleans and Nashville. New Orleans (Louisiana) is the birth place of jazz music. It is still packed with jazz clubs around the Faubourg Marigny and on the (in)famous Bourbon street.
So Coney! by David Godichaud

So Coney! by David Godichaud

Coney island isn't only Wonder Wheel and burger shops. It is also and before New York's beach where all communities from Manhattan, the Bronx, Brooklyn and Queens are merging during summers to escape the heat.
Terence Bogue ; Personal Work

Terence Bogue ; Personal Work

There is a species of frog whose brain will not register if lunch is moving out of reach of its sticky tongue. Its eyes still send signals of a receding meal, but it has evolved in such an extraordinary manner, that there is no part of its brain allocated to receive those signals.

Monochromatic Awards

We invite you to participate in the first edition
of the monochromatic awards. We are looking
for the best monochrome picture for this year, 2022.

The contest is open to any interpretation of monochromatic photography,
black and white, grayscale, sepia or any type of tone.

DEADLINE | THURSDAY, JUNE 30, 2022

PHOTO BY © SVETLIN YOSIFOV

Trending Stories

The lost town by Olga Kulaga

The lost town by Olga Kulaga

In the 1930-es in USSR most Mologa-Sheksna interfluve area got caught in a flowage during the construction of the Rybinsk hydroelectric power station.
Hold Me Tight by Allison Plass

Hold Me Tight by Allison Plass

In my series Hold Me Tight, I explore moments of intimacy and vulnerability between my husband and two teenage sons, often while on family vacations in nature.
Bangladesh; Puppet Show by Anik Rahman

Bangladesh; Puppet Show by Anik Rahman

After every five years, the time for general election comes in Bangladesh, bringing with it a fresh season of despair and uncertainty. For the last couple of months, the nation has been passing through sheer horror
Robert Hutinski – Ecce Homo or a problem of individual consciousness and the universality

Robert Hutinski – Ecce Homo or a problem of individual consciousness and the universality

The world is not static; it is not a given. Consciousness is not static and it is not a given either.
Travelling and photography; Life near the Blos by Kathryn Thompson

Travelling and photography; Life near the Blos by Kathryn Thompson

I am currently enrolled in the Master of Arts in Professional Communication at Royal Roads University in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. I am a self-taught, amateur photographer. Travelling and photography are two of my passions in life.
A personal vision of Normandy; Against Wind and Tide by Nicolas Evariste

A personal vision of Normandy; Against Wind and Tide by Nicolas Evariste

Nicolas Evariste, a 28-year-old photographer from the Granville region, in the Manche department, Lower Normandy.
Syrian refugees; The highest state of morality by Sotiris Tsagatakis

Syrian refugees; The highest state of morality by Sotiris Tsagatakis

603 Syrian refugees were on hunger strike in Syntagma square, that lasted for approximately a month, demanding basic travel documents in order to make their way into Europe.
A Place Called Manly, a Place Called Home by Thomas James Parrish

A Place Called Manly, a Place Called Home by Thomas James Parrish

After three years in London - a year of which was spent confined within my East London share house as the pandemic ran its relentless course - I decided it was time to come home.
Dwarfs; Little Ghosts by Emilie Arfeuil

Dwarfs; Little Ghosts by Emilie Arfeuil

Dwarfs, with a deformed or child-like body, dressed up and made up to frighten audiences in a Ghost House, and it instantly brings to mind old freaks shows. It shocks immediately, as a terrible step backwards in terms of human rights, a disabilities.

Other Stories

stay in touch
Join our mailing list and we'll keep you up to date with all the latest stories, opportunities, calls and more.
We use Sendinblue as our marketing platform. By Clicking below to submit this form, you acknowledge that the information you provided will be transferred to Sendinblue for processing in accordance with their terms of use
We’d love to
Thank you for subscribing!
Submission
Dodho Magazine accepts submissions from emerging and professional photographers from around the world.
Their projects can be published among the best photographers and be viewed by the best professionals in the industry and thousands of photography enthusiasts. Dodho magazine reserves the right to accept or reject any submitted project. Due to the large number of presentations received daily and the need to treat them with the greatest respect and the time necessary for a correct interpretation our average response time is around 5/10 business days in the case of being accepted.
- Between 10/30 images of your best images, in case your project contains a greater number of images which are part of the same indivisible body of work will also be accepted. You must send the images in jpg format to 1200px and 72dpi and quality 9. (No borders or watermarks)
- A short biography along with your photograph. (It must be written in the third person)
- Title and full text of the project with a minimum length of 300 words. (Texts with lesser number of words will not be accepted)
This is the information you need to start preparing your project for its presentation
To send it, you must compress the folder in .ZIP format and use our Wetransfer channel specially dedicated to the reception of works. Links or projects in PDF format will not be accepted. All presentations are carefully reviewed based on their content and final quality of the project or portfolio. If your work is selected for publication in the online version, it will be communicated to you via email and subsequently it will be published.
Contact
How can we help? Got an idea or something you'd like share? Please use the adjacent form, or contact contact@dodho.com
Thank You. We will contact you as soon as possible.
Submission
Dodho Magazine accepts submissions from emerging and professional photographers from around the world.
Their projects can be published among the best photographers and be viewed by the best professionals in the industry and thousands of photography enthusiasts. Dodho magazine reserves the right to accept or reject any submitted project. Due to the large number of presentations received daily and the need to treat them with the greatest respect and the time necessary for a correct interpretation our average response time is around 5/10 business days in the case of being accepted. This is the information you need to start preparing your project for its presentation.
To send it, you must compress the folder in .ZIP format and use our Wetransfer channel specially dedicated to the reception of works. Links or projects in PDF format will not be accepted. All presentations are carefully reviewed based on their content and final quality of the project or portfolio. If your work is selected for publication in the online version, it will be communicated to you via email and subsequently it will be published.
Get in Touch
How can we help? Got an idea or something you'd like share? Please use the adjacent form, or contact hello@dodho.com
Thank You. We will contact you as soon as possible.