Yo no di a Luz by Nadia Shira Cohen

El Salvador's Abortion Ban in the age of Zika. The argument over when the human life begins is one of the most contentious in our world today. There are 66 countries that prohibit abortion under nearly all circumstances—though almost all of them exclude cases where the mother’s life is in danger.
San Luis Del Carmen, Chalatenango, El Salvador-May 2016: Milagro Castro, 24 years old and a few weeks shy of 5 months pregnant contracted Zika at 9 weeks and lives in fear the she will give birth to a deformed baby. But she puts her faith in god. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen

El Salvador’s Abortion Ban in the age of Zika

The argument over when the human life begins is one of the most contentious in our world today. There are 66 countries that prohibit abortion under nearly all circumstances—though almost all of them exclude cases where the mother’s life is in danger.

But in six of these nations, there are no exceptions. This dramatic repression of reproductive rights in El Salvador, Nicaragua, Dominican Republic, Chile, Malta, and the Vatican forbids the practice even in situations of rape, incest, unviable fetus, or risk to the mother’s life.

Earlier this year, during the height of the spread of the mosquito born illness, Zika, the Salvadoran Ministry of Health recommended that women abstain from pregnancy for almost 2 years. The statement was met with outrage at the idea that women in El Salvador are in fact in charge of their own reproductive lives. Pregnant women in today’s El Salvador face a number of challenges from Zika virus, which has been linked to the condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence. Many are victims of rape, often associated with gang initiations as well as high levels of incest, with many, alarmingly between the ages of 10 and 14. Over half of all reported suicides are of pregnant teens. However the most important threat to women’s reproductive rights is by far the State’s criminal ban on abortion. Since El Salvador’s absolute abortion ban came into law in 1998, some 150 women have been prosecuted under it. Doctors and nurses in public hospitals are required by the law to report any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most, as doctors in private hospitals are not required to give information. Some women are even sentenced to up to 50-year prison terms for what are essentially still births. They are known as the “Mata Niños,” roughly 25-30 women imprisoned and serving between 30 to 50 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Prosecutors argue against the nature of science, accusing women of willing themselves to expel their premature babies, creating an environment where women are persecuted for the mere natural failures of their own bodies. A woman who contracts Zika while pregnant not only worries for the well being of her unborn child but for the increased risk of miscarrying and then being suspected and possibly accused of intentionally aborting. But then again Zika is perhaps the last of many women’s worries in El Salvador. [Official Website]

San Luis Del Carmen, Chalatenango, El Salvador-May 2016: Milagro Castro, 24 years old and a few weeks shy of 5 months pregnant contracted Zika at 9 weeks and lives in fear the she will give birth to a deformed baby. But she puts her faith in god. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
San Luis Del Carmen, Chalatenango, El Salvador-May 2016: Milagro Castro, 24 years old and a few weeks shy of 5 months pregnant contracted Zika at 9 weeks and lives in fear the she will give birth to a deformed baby. But she puts her faith in god. Pregnant women in today’s El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women’s reproductive rights is by far the State’s criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women’s uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women’s stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen

San Salvador, El Salvador-May 2016: A pro life wall mural adorns the wall in a side street on the main highway from Chalatenango to San Salvador. The society has over time embraced the abortion ban for the most part. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
San Salvador, El Salvador-May 2016: A pro life wall mural adorns the wall in a side street on the main highway from Chalatenango to San Salvador. The society has over time embraced the abortion ban for the most part.

Panchmalco, El Salvador-May 2016: Churchgoers pay tribut to the Virgin Mary at a mass as part of the annual Palms Festival features a procession of the Virgin Mary through the town's narrow streets and attracts people from all over the country as well as internationally who come to idolize her. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen as part of the annual Palms Festival features a procession of the Virgin Mary through the town's narrow streets and attracts people from all over the country as well as internationally who come to idolize her. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive righ
Panchmalco, El Salvador-May 2016: Churchgoers pay tribut to the Virgin Mary at a mass as part of the annual Palms Festival features a procession of the Virgin Mary through the town’s narrow streets and attracts people from all over the country as well as internationally who come to idolize her.

Planes de Renderos, El Salvador-May 2016: Abigail Sanches from San Luis Stalpa la Paz waiting to be examined at the maternal waiting house which especially helps women who come from areas without access to a nearby hospital wait out the end of the pregnancies in order to be close to a hospital and avoid complications. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
Planes de Renderos, El Salvador-May 2016: Abigail Sanches from San Luis Stalpa la Paz waiting to be examined at the maternal waiting house which especially helps women who come from areas without access to a nearby hospital wait out the end of the pregnancies in order to be close to a hospital and avoid complications.

San Salvador, El Salvador-May 2016: Families gather at the general cemetary to pay tribute to their mothers on Mother's Day. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
San Salvador, El Salvador-May 2016: Families gather at the general cemetary to pay tribute to their mothers on Mother’s Day.

Panchmalco, El Salvador-May 2016: Women of the community carry the Virgin Mary on their backs on a procession through the town of Panchimalco. The annual Palms Festival features a procession of the Virgin Mary through the town's narrow streets and attracts people from all over the country as well as internationally who come to idolize her. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
Panchmalco, El Salvador-May 2016: Women of the community carry the Virgin Mary on their backs on a procession through the town of Panchimalco. The annual Palms Festival features a procession of the Virgin Mary through the town’s narrow streets and attracts people from all over the country as well as internationally who come to idolize her.

Panchmalco, El Salvador-May 2016: The queen of the annual Palms Festival eating lunch with the whole town at her home. The festival features a procession of the Virgin Mary through the town's narrow streets and attracts people from all over the country as well as internationally who come to idolize her. Young women such as her who live in gang controlled neighborhoods are under increasing risk of being raped and forced to date gang members. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
Panchmalco, El Salvador-May 2016: The queen of the annual Palms Festival eating lunch with the whole town at her home. The festival features a procession of the Virgin Mary through the town’s narrow streets and attracts people from all over the country as well as internationally who come to idolize her. Young women such as her who live in gang controlled neighborhoods are under increasing risk of being raped and forced to date gang members.

Sonsonate, El Salvador-May 2016: María Tamayo examines Flor Marlene Morales at the maternal waiting house in Sonsonate. Flor, who is 15 and from the Juayua municipality arrived at the clinic 40 weeks pregnant, by herself. Her father was assasinated by gangs and she lives with an aunt and her grandmother. The maternal waiting houses especially help women who come from areas without access to a nearby hospital wait out the end of the pregnancies in order to be close to a hospital and avoid complications. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
Sonsonate, El Salvador-May 2016: María Tamayo examines Flor Marlene Morales at the maternal waiting house in Sonsonate. Flor, who is 15 and from the Juayua municipality arrived at the clinic 40 weeks pregnant, by herself. Her father was assasinated by gangs and she lives with an aunt and her grandmother. The maternal waiting houses especially help women who come from areas without access to a nearby hospital wait out the end of the pregnancies in order to be close to a hospital and avoid complications.

San Salvador, El Salvador-May 2016: Dra. María Isabel Rodríguez, Director of the"Hospital Nacional de la Mujer" in San Salvador congratulates Brenda Molina, 34 years old on her newly born twins, the second to be born on Mother's Day in the city. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
San Salvador, El Salvador-May 2016: Dra. María Isabel Rodríguez, Director of the”Hospital Nacional de la Mujer” in San Salvador congratulates Brenda Molina, 34 years old on her newly born twins, the second to be born on Mother’s Day in the city.

Sonsonate, El Salvador-May 2016: Flor Marlene Morales in labor at the maternal waiting house in Sonsonate. who is 15 and from the Juayua municipality arrived at the clinic 40 weeks pregnant, by herself. Her father was assasinated by gangs and she lives with an aunt and her grandmother. The maternal waiting houses especially help women who come from areas without access to a nearby hospital wait out the end of the pregnancies in order to be close to a hospital and avoid complications. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
Sonsonate, El Salvador-May 2016: Flor Marlene Morales in labor at the maternal waiting house in Sonsonate. who is 15 and from the Juayua municipality arrived at the clinic 40 weeks pregnant, by herself. Her father was assasinated by gangs and she lives with an aunt and her grandmother. The maternal waiting houses especially help women who come from areas without access to a nearby hospital wait out the end of the pregnancies in order to be close to a hospital and avoid complications.

Planes de Renderos, El Salvador-May 2016: Pregnant women line up to receive mosquito repellent at the maternal waiting house in Planes de Renderos. The women were told they would receive repellent and mosquito nets at an event sponsored by the Canadian Embassy, WFP and the Ministry of Health however, after the press conference, the nets were reloaded into a truck and sent to a hospital. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
Planes de Renderos, El Salvador-May 2016: Pregnant women line up to receive mosquito repellent at the maternal waiting house in Planes de Renderos. The women were told they would receive repellent and mosquito nets at an event sponsored by the Canadian Embassy, WFP and the Ministry of Health however, after the press conference, the nets were reloaded into a truck and sent to a hospital.

Planes de Renderos, El Salvador-May 2016: Idalia Alverado Sanchez and her husband Alex in an intimate moment awaiting the arrival of their first child together at the maternal waiting house which especially help women who come from areas without access to a nearby hospital wait out the end of the pregnancies in order to be close to a hospital and avoid complications. This is 21 year old Idalia's 3rd child, the first of which she had when she was 13. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
Planes de Renderos, El Salvador-May 2016: Idalia Alverado Sanchez and her husband Alex in an intimate moment awaiting the arrival of their first child together at the maternal waiting house which especially help women who come from areas without access to a nearby hospital wait out the end of the pregnancies in order to be close to a hospital and avoid complications. This is 21 year old Idalia’s 3rd child, the first of which she had when she was 13.

August 2016-Suchitoto, El Salvador: Pentacostals in a pick up truck outside of The Santa Lucia Cathedral in Suchitoto. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
August 2016-Suchitoto, El Salvador: Pentacostals in a pick up truck outside of The Santa Lucia Cathedral in Suchitoto. ©Nadia Shira Cohen

San Salvador, El Salvador-May 2016: Pigeons storm the square in front of the Metropolitan Cathedral of San Salvador, where 44 people were killed at the funeral of Archbishop Óscar Romero who was assassinated while giving mass in another small chapel in 1980. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
San Salvador, El Salvador-May 2016: Pigeons storm the square in front of the Metropolitan Cathedral of San Salvador, where 44 people were killed at the funeral of Archbishop Óscar Romero who was assassinated while giving mass in another small chapel in 1980.

San Salvador, El Salvador-May 2016: Maria Teresa Rivera reacts to her sentence annulement in Federal Court, chanting "Dios Existe" with a photo of her son, Oscar in her hand. The Supreme Court annulled María Teresa Rivera's 40 year sentence for aggravated homicide of her prematurely born infant after she had already served 4 years in jail, barely able to see her son who was being taken care of by her ill mother in a violent gang controlled neighborhood. After a careful review of the medical evidence and all the facts the judge stipulated that there was not enough proof of evidence that she intentially killed her child and ordered that reparations be made to her for her time served. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
San Salvador, El Salvador-May 2016: Maria Teresa Rivera reacts to her sentence annulement in Federal Court, chanting “Dios Existe” with a photo of her son, Oscar in her hand. The Supreme Court annulled María Teresa Rivera’s 40 year sentence for aggravated homicide of her prematurely born infant after she had already served 4 years in jail, barely able to see her son who was being taken care of by her ill mother in a violent gang controlled neighborhood. After a careful review of the medical evidence and all the facts the judge stipulated that there was not enough proof of evidence that she intentially killed her child and ordered that reparations be made to her for her time served.

San Salvador, El Salvador-May 2016: Sanitation workers of the community health clinic in the Santa Tecla are fumigate houses, streets, sewers, and schools against mosquitos, as part of a government program to fight mosquito born diseases Zika, Dengue, and ChicPregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
San Salvador, El Salvador-May 2016: Sanitation workers of the community health clinic in the Santa Tecla are fumigate houses, streets, sewers, and schools against mosquitos, as part of a government program to fight mosquito born diseases Zika, Dengue, and Chic.

The international Women´s Media Foundation helped support Nadia´s reporting in El Salvador

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An Aerial Wonderland by Graham Earnshaw

An Aerial Wonderland by Graham Earnshaw

Graham took a morning flight in a small Cessna over the coastline of the main township of Broome, in the hope of capturing some beautiful and unusual aerials over nearby Roebuck Bay and Willie Creek.
180 beats per minute by Ivaylo Yorgov

180 beats per minute by Ivaylo Yorgov

180 beats per minute’ celebrates the determination of the millions of runners around the globe who push through sweat and tears to achieve their goals.
Michal Baran ; Beauty & Fashion Photography

Michal Baran ; Beauty & Fashion Photography

Michał Baran was born and raised in Poland, graduating in computer science, he worked as a web-master, graphic designer and developer, but his greatest passion has always been photography. 
I Never told Anyone by Bénédicte Vanderreydt

I Never told Anyone by Bénédicte Vanderreydt

These seven images represent the women in Bénédicte Vanderreydt’s family that have been oppressed and objectified by a male dominated society, at a time when personal honour was of great significance to men.
The exposed city by Sevil Alkan

The exposed city by Sevil Alkan

Taking photography by mobile phones created a new trend by changing the border and direction of the photography
Religious devotion; Viernes Santo by Oliver Weber

Religious devotion; Viernes Santo by Oliver Weber

Ceremony of the funeral of god’s son Jesus. With the arrival of spring comes Easter week. It has centuries of history behind it and is one of Spain’s most authentic and emotive celebrations.

Trending Stories

Kolkata; The Day That Wasn’t by Debmalya Ray Choudhuri

Kolkata; The Day That Wasn’t by Debmalya Ray Choudhuri

People got out to work in the morning and Kolkata ,as usual, was jostling with the crowd .Then a terrible thing happened that crippled the city and left an indelible imprint on the minds of the happy go lucky crowd .
Sexuality : Windows by Mike Chaiken

Sexuality : Windows by Mike Chaiken

Chaiken’s series explores sexuality and the idea that the largest sexual organ for any human being is the brain. The model was pleased with the results and other models attracted by the effort, and intrigued by nudity but in a secret manner, stepped forward to pose as well.
The fashion photography of Sean Archer

The fashion photography of Sean Archer

Fashion Photography ; Sean Archer is an agent from the movie Face Off. I took the nickname when I was not sure if I'm any good in this. My real name is Stanislav Puchkovsky, I am from Yekaterinburg, Russia.
The Hazel Collection by Julie Fowells

The Hazel Collection by Julie Fowells

Hazel was a beautiful hound with an extraordinary gift; she could sniff out a lost or discarded tennis ball lurking just about anywhere.  Down a cliff, up a tree, no matter how remote the location she would stubbornly bark until I acknowledged her hunting prowess. 
Urban environments; Deconstruction by Lilyan Aloma

Urban environments; Deconstruction by Lilyan Aloma

The images in this body of work reflect my ongoing fascination with urban environments and the impact that commerce has on them. It is my attempt to resolve the visual tension created by the over-development of the city that I have lived in and loved most of my life.
Presence by Daniel Murtagh

Presence by Daniel Murtagh

For Daniel Murtagh, the essence of a good portrait is ‘Presence’ , the experience of a person not merely seen, but felt . "I like to compare it to the experience in music , a certain combination of sounds expresses the intent of the composer"
Fishing Activity by Kaushik Dolui

Fishing Activity by Kaushik Dolui

Fisheries play an important role in the economy of India. India is one of the largest producers of fish, both marine and inland.
Un Natural Bestiary by Andrea Alessio

Un Natural Bestiary by Andrea Alessio

In this work Andrea Alessio collects, as in an ancient bestiary, a series of animal images. The forest does not frighten modern man anymore. Its sinister night calls no longer stalk the minds of children.
Tropical hair salons by Laurent Muschel

Tropical hair salons by Laurent Muschel

In Africa and Latin America, hairdressers not only cut, shave and style hair; they build up hair like real architects.  The tropical "Salon de coiffure" is, however, a very diverse world; from street barbershops to posh hair salons.

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Dodho Magazine accepts submissions from emerging and professional photographers from around the world.
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Submission
Dodho Magazine accepts submissions from emerging and professional photographers from around the world.
Their projects can be published among the best photographers and be viewed by the best professionals in the industry and thousands of photography enthusiasts. Dodho magazine reserves the right to accept or reject any submitted project. Due to the large number of presentations received daily and the need to treat them with the greatest respect and the time necessary for a correct interpretation our average response time is around 5/10 business days in the case of being accepted. This is the information you need to start preparing your project for its presentation.
To send it, you must compress the folder in .ZIP format and use our Wetransfer channel specially dedicated to the reception of works. Links or projects in PDF format will not be accepted. All presentations are carefully reviewed based on their content and final quality of the project or portfolio. If your work is selected for publication in the online version, it will be communicated to you via email and subsequently it will be published.
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How can we help? Got an idea or something you'd like share? Please use the adjacent form, or contact contact@dodho.com
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