AmericaStoryYo no di a Luz by Nadia Shira Cohen

El Salvador's Abortion Ban in the age of Zika. The argument over when the human life begins is one of the most contentious in our world today. There are 66 countries that prohibit abortion under nearly all circumstances—though almost all of them exclude cases where the mother’s life is in danger.

El Salvador’s Abortion Ban in the age of Zika

The argument over when the human life begins is one of the most contentious in our world today. There are 66 countries that prohibit abortion under nearly all circumstances—though almost all of them exclude cases where the mother’s life is in danger.

But in six of these nations, there are no exceptions. This dramatic repression of reproductive rights in El Salvador, Nicaragua, Dominican Republic, Chile, Malta, and the Vatican forbids the practice even in situations of rape, incest, unviable fetus, or risk to the mother’s life.

Earlier this year, during the height of the spread of the mosquito born illness, Zika, the Salvadoran Ministry of Health recommended that women abstain from pregnancy for almost 2 years. The statement was met with outrage at the idea that women in El Salvador are in fact in charge of their own reproductive lives. Pregnant women in today’s El Salvador face a number of challenges from Zika virus, which has been linked to the condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence. Many are victims of rape, often associated with gang initiations as well as high levels of incest, with many, alarmingly between the ages of 10 and 14. Over half of all reported suicides are of pregnant teens. However the most important threat to women’s reproductive rights is by far the State’s criminal ban on abortion. Since El Salvador’s absolute abortion ban came into law in 1998, some 150 women have been prosecuted under it. Doctors and nurses in public hospitals are required by the law to report any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most, as doctors in private hospitals are not required to give information. Some women are even sentenced to up to 50-year prison terms for what are essentially still births. They are known as the “Mata Niños,” roughly 25-30 women imprisoned and serving between 30 to 50 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Prosecutors argue against the nature of science, accusing women of willing themselves to expel their premature babies, creating an environment where women are persecuted for the mere natural failures of their own bodies. A woman who contracts Zika while pregnant not only worries for the well being of her unborn child but for the increased risk of miscarrying and then being suspected and possibly accused of intentionally aborting. But then again Zika is perhaps the last of many women’s worries in El Salvador. [Official Website]

San Luis Del Carmen, Chalatenango, El Salvador-May 2016: Milagro Castro, 24 years old and a few weeks shy of 5 months pregnant contracted Zika at 9 weeks and lives in fear the she will give birth to a deformed baby. But she puts her faith in god. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
San Luis Del Carmen, Chalatenango, El Salvador-May 2016: Milagro Castro, 24 years old and a few weeks shy of 5 months pregnant contracted Zika at 9 weeks and lives in fear the she will give birth to a deformed baby. But she puts her faith in god. Pregnant women in today’s El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women’s reproductive rights is by far the State’s criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women’s uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women’s stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen

San Salvador, El Salvador-May 2016: A pro life wall mural adorns the wall in a side street on the main highway from Chalatenango to San Salvador. The society has over time embraced the abortion ban for the most part. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
San Salvador, El Salvador-May 2016: A pro life wall mural adorns the wall in a side street on the main highway from Chalatenango to San Salvador. The society has over time embraced the abortion ban for the most part.

Panchmalco, El Salvador-May 2016: Churchgoers pay tribut to the Virgin Mary at a mass as part of the annual Palms Festival features a procession of the Virgin Mary through the town's narrow streets and attracts people from all over the country as well as internationally who come to idolize her. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen as part of the annual Palms Festival features a procession of the Virgin Mary through the town's narrow streets and attracts people from all over the country as well as internationally who come to idolize her. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive righ
Panchmalco, El Salvador-May 2016: Churchgoers pay tribut to the Virgin Mary at a mass as part of the annual Palms Festival features a procession of the Virgin Mary through the town’s narrow streets and attracts people from all over the country as well as internationally who come to idolize her.

Planes de Renderos, El Salvador-May 2016: Abigail Sanches from San Luis Stalpa la Paz waiting to be examined at the maternal waiting house which especially helps women who come from areas without access to a nearby hospital wait out the end of the pregnancies in order to be close to a hospital and avoid complications. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
Planes de Renderos, El Salvador-May 2016: Abigail Sanches from San Luis Stalpa la Paz waiting to be examined at the maternal waiting house which especially helps women who come from areas without access to a nearby hospital wait out the end of the pregnancies in order to be close to a hospital and avoid complications.

San Salvador, El Salvador-May 2016: Families gather at the general cemetary to pay tribute to their mothers on Mother's Day. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
San Salvador, El Salvador-May 2016: Families gather at the general cemetary to pay tribute to their mothers on Mother’s Day.

Panchmalco, El Salvador-May 2016: Women of the community carry the Virgin Mary on their backs on a procession through the town of Panchimalco. The annual Palms Festival features a procession of the Virgin Mary through the town's narrow streets and attracts people from all over the country as well as internationally who come to idolize her. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
Panchmalco, El Salvador-May 2016: Women of the community carry the Virgin Mary on their backs on a procession through the town of Panchimalco. The annual Palms Festival features a procession of the Virgin Mary through the town’s narrow streets and attracts people from all over the country as well as internationally who come to idolize her.

Panchmalco, El Salvador-May 2016: The queen of the annual Palms Festival eating lunch with the whole town at her home. The festival features a procession of the Virgin Mary through the town's narrow streets and attracts people from all over the country as well as internationally who come to idolize her. Young women such as her who live in gang controlled neighborhoods are under increasing risk of being raped and forced to date gang members. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
Panchmalco, El Salvador-May 2016: The queen of the annual Palms Festival eating lunch with the whole town at her home. The festival features a procession of the Virgin Mary through the town’s narrow streets and attracts people from all over the country as well as internationally who come to idolize her. Young women such as her who live in gang controlled neighborhoods are under increasing risk of being raped and forced to date gang members.

Sonsonate, El Salvador-May 2016: María Tamayo examines Flor Marlene Morales at the maternal waiting house in Sonsonate. Flor, who is 15 and from the Juayua municipality arrived at the clinic 40 weeks pregnant, by herself. Her father was assasinated by gangs and she lives with an aunt and her grandmother. The maternal waiting houses especially help women who come from areas without access to a nearby hospital wait out the end of the pregnancies in order to be close to a hospital and avoid complications. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
Sonsonate, El Salvador-May 2016: María Tamayo examines Flor Marlene Morales at the maternal waiting house in Sonsonate. Flor, who is 15 and from the Juayua municipality arrived at the clinic 40 weeks pregnant, by herself. Her father was assasinated by gangs and she lives with an aunt and her grandmother. The maternal waiting houses especially help women who come from areas without access to a nearby hospital wait out the end of the pregnancies in order to be close to a hospital and avoid complications.

San Salvador, El Salvador-May 2016: Dra. María Isabel Rodríguez, Director of the"Hospital Nacional de la Mujer" in San Salvador congratulates Brenda Molina, 34 years old on her newly born twins, the second to be born on Mother's Day in the city. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
San Salvador, El Salvador-May 2016: Dra. María Isabel Rodríguez, Director of the”Hospital Nacional de la Mujer” in San Salvador congratulates Brenda Molina, 34 years old on her newly born twins, the second to be born on Mother’s Day in the city.

Sonsonate, El Salvador-May 2016: Flor Marlene Morales in labor at the maternal waiting house in Sonsonate. who is 15 and from the Juayua municipality arrived at the clinic 40 weeks pregnant, by herself. Her father was assasinated by gangs and she lives with an aunt and her grandmother. The maternal waiting houses especially help women who come from areas without access to a nearby hospital wait out the end of the pregnancies in order to be close to a hospital and avoid complications. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
Sonsonate, El Salvador-May 2016: Flor Marlene Morales in labor at the maternal waiting house in Sonsonate. who is 15 and from the Juayua municipality arrived at the clinic 40 weeks pregnant, by herself. Her father was assasinated by gangs and she lives with an aunt and her grandmother. The maternal waiting houses especially help women who come from areas without access to a nearby hospital wait out the end of the pregnancies in order to be close to a hospital and avoid complications.

Planes de Renderos, El Salvador-May 2016: Pregnant women line up to receive mosquito repellent at the maternal waiting house in Planes de Renderos. The women were told they would receive repellent and mosquito nets at an event sponsored by the Canadian Embassy, WFP and the Ministry of Health however, after the press conference, the nets were reloaded into a truck and sent to a hospital. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
Planes de Renderos, El Salvador-May 2016: Pregnant women line up to receive mosquito repellent at the maternal waiting house in Planes de Renderos. The women were told they would receive repellent and mosquito nets at an event sponsored by the Canadian Embassy, WFP and the Ministry of Health however, after the press conference, the nets were reloaded into a truck and sent to a hospital.

Planes de Renderos, El Salvador-May 2016: Idalia Alverado Sanchez and her husband Alex in an intimate moment awaiting the arrival of their first child together at the maternal waiting house which especially help women who come from areas without access to a nearby hospital wait out the end of the pregnancies in order to be close to a hospital and avoid complications. This is 21 year old Idalia's 3rd child, the first of which she had when she was 13. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
Planes de Renderos, El Salvador-May 2016: Idalia Alverado Sanchez and her husband Alex in an intimate moment awaiting the arrival of their first child together at the maternal waiting house which especially help women who come from areas without access to a nearby hospital wait out the end of the pregnancies in order to be close to a hospital and avoid complications. This is 21 year old Idalia’s 3rd child, the first of which she had when she was 13.

August 2016-Suchitoto, El Salvador: Pentacostals in a pick up truck outside of The Santa Lucia Cathedral in Suchitoto. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
August 2016-Suchitoto, El Salvador: Pentacostals in a pick up truck outside of The Santa Lucia Cathedral in Suchitoto. ©Nadia Shira Cohen

San Salvador, El Salvador-May 2016: Pigeons storm the square in front of the Metropolitan Cathedral of San Salvador, where 44 people were killed at the funeral of Archbishop Óscar Romero who was assassinated while giving mass in another small chapel in 1980. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
San Salvador, El Salvador-May 2016: Pigeons storm the square in front of the Metropolitan Cathedral of San Salvador, where 44 people were killed at the funeral of Archbishop Óscar Romero who was assassinated while giving mass in another small chapel in 1980.

San Salvador, El Salvador-May 2016: Maria Teresa Rivera reacts to her sentence annulement in Federal Court, chanting "Dios Existe" with a photo of her son, Oscar in her hand. The Supreme Court annulled María Teresa Rivera's 40 year sentence for aggravated homicide of her prematurely born infant after she had already served 4 years in jail, barely able to see her son who was being taken care of by her ill mother in a violent gang controlled neighborhood. After a careful review of the medical evidence and all the facts the judge stipulated that there was not enough proof of evidence that she intentially killed her child and ordered that reparations be made to her for her time served. Pregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
San Salvador, El Salvador-May 2016: Maria Teresa Rivera reacts to her sentence annulement in Federal Court, chanting “Dios Existe” with a photo of her son, Oscar in her hand. The Supreme Court annulled María Teresa Rivera’s 40 year sentence for aggravated homicide of her prematurely born infant after she had already served 4 years in jail, barely able to see her son who was being taken care of by her ill mother in a violent gang controlled neighborhood. After a careful review of the medical evidence and all the facts the judge stipulated that there was not enough proof of evidence that she intentially killed her child and ordered that reparations be made to her for her time served.

San Salvador, El Salvador-May 2016: Sanitation workers of the community health clinic in the Santa Tecla are fumigate houses, streets, sewers, and schools against mosquitos, as part of a government program to fight mosquito born diseases Zika, Dengue, and ChicPregnant women in today's El Salvador face a whole host of challenges from the threat of the mosquito born illness, Zika which has been linked to the grave condition of microcephaly in newborns, to the constant threat of gang violence with one of the highest murder rates in the world, to an increasing rape epidemic. However the most important threat to women's reproductive rights is by far the State's criminal ban on abortion. Doctors and nurses are trained to spy on women's uteruses in public hospitals, reporting any suspicious alteration to the authorities and provoking criminal charges which can lead to between 6 months to 7 years in prison. It is the poorer class of women who suffer the most as doctors in private hospitals are not required to report. Roughly 25 women are serving 30 to 40 year sentences on homicide charges for allegedly killing their newborn children. Although the women's stories, most of which resemble premature births or late term miscarigaes are often dismissed in trials, laced with moral accusations, based little on the consitution and scientific facts. ©Nadia Shira Cohen
San Salvador, El Salvador-May 2016: Sanitation workers of the community health clinic in the Santa Tecla are fumigate houses, streets, sewers, and schools against mosquitos, as part of a government program to fight mosquito born diseases Zika, Dengue, and Chic.

The international Women´s Media Foundation helped support Nadia´s reporting in El Salvador

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AmericaB&WConceptFeaturedUnder the sign of the rat; Roger the Rat by Roger Ballen

Surreal, refined, disturbing: Roger Ballen has made a name for himself with his special eye for what is usually considered minor or outside, yet is nevertheless profound and touching.
Intimate portraits of animals; Behind Glass by Anne Berry

B&WBioEuropeFeaturedIntimate portraits of animals; Behind Glass by Anne Berry

Behind Glass is a collection of photographs made in monkey houses of small zoos throughout Europe. Anne Berry is recognized for her ability to create lyrical, intimate portraits of animals.
Fictional narrative photography; Birth Undisturbed by Natalie Lennard

ConceptEuropeFeaturedFictional narrative photography; Birth Undisturbed by Natalie Lennard

Birth Undisturbed is a fictional narrative photography series by Natalie Lennard, that brings scenes of natural childbirth into cinematic fine-art tableaux.
Japanese Aquariums by George Nobechi

AsiaFeaturedStoryJapanese Aquariums by George Nobechi

Japanese Aquariums is a journey into some of my oldest, most treasured childhood memories. Whenever I visited my grandparents in the small, northern Japanese city of Otaru, my grandfather, a high school teacher and an enormous influence in my life, would take me to the aquarium.
Greenland; Stories from the Sea by Camille Michel

EuropeFeaturedStoryGreenland; Stories from the Sea by Camille Michel

Greenland became politically independent from Denmark in 1979 and is slowly getting on the path to economic independency. The ‘ice country’ is currently facing the consequences of climate change.
Intimate diary; Jazz Notes by Giuseppe Cardoni

B&WEuropeFeaturedShotIntimate diary; Jazz Notes by Giuseppe Cardoni

It is a declaration of love by Giuseppe Cardoni, but also by an Italian region, Umbria, which has always hosted the most important jazz festivals and where the author took most of his photographs.
Guatemala; Until the corn Grows Back by Lys Arango

EuropeFeaturedStoryGuatemala; Until the corn Grows Back by Lys Arango

Until the corn Grows Back; Lys Arango’s project was selected and published in our print edition 16. Criminal violence in Central America was something that happened very far away and that explained, according to the media, the gigantic caravans of migrants that from 2017 began to travel thousands of kilometres to reach the United States
Greatest jockeys; Fortza Paris by Marco Cheli

EuropeFeaturedStoryGreatest jockeys; Fortza Paris by Marco Cheli

Fortza Paris; Marco Cheli’s project was selected and published in our print edition 16. Over the years, until today there are many young Sardinians, specifically from Barbagia, who leave their island with the dream of becoming a jockey of the Palio di Siena.
Africa; River Blindness by Marcus Trappaud Bjørn

B&WEuropeFeaturedShotAfrica; River Blindness by Marcus Trappaud Bjørn

The project River blindness focuses on a neglected tropical disease, which is the second most common cause of infectious blindness worldwide.
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Issue #14 | September 2020
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Photo by ©Ryotaro Horiuchi | Japan | Issue#14
Dodho Magazine is pleased to announce the new call for the photographers selection from all over the world that will be presented in an exceptional edition.
Deadline: Monday, November 30, 2020
Photo by ©Ryotaro Horiuchi | Japan | Issue#14
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Dodho Magazine is pleased to announce the new call for the photographers selection from all over the world that will be presented in an exceptional edition.
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Deadline: Monday, November 30, 2020
Contact
How can we help? Got an idea or something you'd like share? Please use the adjacent form, or contact contact@dodho.com
Thank You. We will contact you as soon as possible.
Submission
Dodho Magazine accepts submissions from emerging and professional photographers from around the world.
Their projects can be published among the best photographers and be viewed by the best professionals in the industry and thousands of photography enthusiasts. Dodho magazine reserves the right to accept or reject any submitted project. Due to the large number of presentations received daily and the need to treat them with the greatest respect and the time necessary for a correct interpretation our average response time is around 5/10 business days in the case of being accepted. This is the information you need to start preparing your project for its presentation.
To send it, you must compress the folder in .ZIP format and use our Wetransfer channel specially dedicated to the reception of works. Links or projects in PDF format will not be accepted. All presentations are carefully reviewed based on their content and final quality of the project or portfolio. If your work is selected for publication in the online version, it will be communicated to you via email and subsequently it will be published.
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