ConceptEuropeFeaturedPicasso’s Women by Cristina Vatielli

The project was conceived to reveal the stories of the women who revolved around Pablo Picasso’s life, by strongly influencing the work of the most acclaimed artist of the XX century.
315010 min

CALL FOR ENTRIES

DEADLINE: FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2018
HoursMinutesSeconds

Olga Khokhlova. Pablo Picasso’s first wife. She was a Ukrainian dancer from the high Aristocracy. They married in 1918 and spent most of their time together attending aristocratic salons and sharing the life of the elite. When Olga discovered the unfaithful nature of the painter, she went mad, and began to threaten Picasso and the women he frequented. She died of cancer in 1951, alone.
Olga Khokhlova. Pablo Picasso’s first wife. She was a Ukrainian dancer from the high Aristocracy. They married in 1918 and spent most of their time together attending aristocratic salons and sharing the life of the elite. When Olga discovered the unfaithful nature of the painter, she went mad, and began to threaten Picasso and the women he frequented.
She died of cancer in 1951, alone.

The project was conceived to reveal the stories of the women who revolved around Pablo Picasso’s life, by strongly influencing the work of the most acclaimed artist of the XX century.

The intention is to make a reflection upon the lives and psychology of these women, who were used and often abused by the great painter.

The locations were chosen based on a research on the character’s subconscious and a study on their personality after the relationship with Picasso.
The choice of the self-portraiture was moved by the necessity to identify with the personality of each woman. Although very different from each other, they stay linked by the same draining love they felt for the artist.

About Cristina Vatielli

Cristina Vatielli was born in Rome in 1983. She graduated at Scuola Romana di Fotografia. Since 2004 Cristina has been collaborating with Paolo Pellegrin, Magnum Photos photographer. In 2006 she worked at Magnum Photos digital department in the Paris office. Since 2006 she works as a photographer in various fields, advertising, portraiture, and documentary. Her works have been published on main international magazines and her projects have received recognition by IPA, MIFA, Sony Awards and many others. [Official Website]

Marie Therese Walter was Picasso’s mistress and model, from 1927 until about 1935 and the mother of his daughter, Maya Widmaier-Picasso. Their relationship began when she was seventeen years old; Marie Thérèse always hoped that Picasso would marry her one day. She eventually hanged herself four years after Picasso’s death
Marie Therese Walter was Picasso’s mistress and model, from 1927 until about 1935 and the mother of his daughter, Maya Widmaier-Picasso. Their relationship began when she was seventeen years old; Marie Thérèse always hoped that Picasso would marry her one day. She eventually hanged herself four years after Picasso’s death

Gaby Depeyre worked at a cabaret where she sang and danced. Unlike most of Picasso’s women, she played hard to get with the painter and he would write her love letters all the time. From the beginning, she never let the painter steal her soul. She weighed pro and cons of a possible relationship with Picasso and in the end chose the affective certainty of another man, Herbert Lespinasse. However, she was quite conscious of what she was giving up when she refused Picasso’s marriage proposal, and this makes her choice even more courageous.
Gaby Depeyre worked at a cabaret where she sang and danced. Unlike most of Picasso’s women, she played hard to get with the painter and he would write her love letters all the time. From the beginning, she never let the painter steal her soul. She weighed pro and cons of a possible relationship with Picasso and in the end chose the affective certainty of another man, Herbert Lespinasse. However, she was quite conscious of what she was giving up when she refused Picasso’s marriage proposal, and this makes her choice even more courageous.

Jacqueline Rocque was Pablo Picasso’s ‘last’ muse and second wife. During their 11 years of marriage, he created more than 400 portraits of her. When they first met, she was 26 and he was over 70. Jacqueline saved him from loneliness and old age. Jacqueline inspired the master, and Picasso continued to work with her until the end. He painted more portraits of her than of any other woman. When Picasso died, Jacqueline was so jealous of his lovers and children, that she forbade the rest of the family to attend his funeral.  In 1986 (13 years after Picasso’s death), Jacqueline shot herself.
Jacqueline Rocque was Pablo Picasso’s ‘last’ muse and second wife. During their 11 years of marriage, he created more than 400 portraits of her. When they first met, she was 26 and he was over 70. Jacqueline saved him from loneliness and old age. Jacqueline inspired the master, and Picasso continued to work with her until the end. He painted more portraits of her than of any other woman. When Picasso died, Jacqueline was so jealous of his lovers and children, that she forbade the rest of the family to attend his funeral.  In 1986 (13 years after Picasso’s death), Jacqueline shot herself.

DODHO MAGAZINE
* We hate spam and never share your details.
Thank You. We will contact you as soon as possible.
Magazine: contact@dodho.com
Submission: submission@dodho.com
Management: management@dodho.com
Advertising: advertising@dodho.com
08008 - BARCELONA
SUBSCRIBE TO NEWSLETTER
NESWLETTER
* We hate spam and never share your details.
Thank You. We will contact you as soon as possible.
Magazine: contact@dodho.com
Submission: submission@dodho.com
Management: management@dodho.com
Advertising: advertising@dodho.com
08008 - BARCELONA