DodhersMy Two Decade Brush with Neo Pictorialism

When I started as a photographer, my knowledge of the photographic landscape was rather limited in terms of the history of photography and the movements within it. 

When I started as a photographer, my knowledge of the photographic landscape was rather limited in terms of the history of photography and the movements within it.  It only really extended to what I saw and read in the amateur magazines I began reading.

I had never heard the term Pictorialism, although I most likely would have seen some of the work of its practitioners in those pages. I saw myself as an Impressionist, and would use colour film and many and various Cokin filters, and multiple exposures to fragment and blur reality. Later that year I started experimenting with this technique, that I used at whiles for the next twenty years, until they stopped making the film. I did not investigate other film and drew a line under this period of my work. These early pictures did, however, give me a love of colour which was one of the cornerstones, for the surrealism I was destined to start the following year.

This jewel-like work evokes a haunting dreamlike version of reality. Neither literal nor abstract but somewhere in between, it conjures up a poignant visceral feeling rather than engages the intellect. It is wistfully reminiscent of, perhaps, a child’s eye view of the world as seen through a distorted lens with its texture of bubbles, buckling and warping. It brings back the memory of marbles we had as children and would hold up to our eye, or maybe it is an Alice in Wonderland psychedelic dreamscape.

The technique was designed to complement the low-rise London of ancient monuments where I first began using it before I took it further afield. I photographed ships on the Thames, the British at play on a Sunday afternoon, children at the beach during their summer holidays and quaint villages. After all these years, I recently sat down and I tried to come up with a name for the technique. I had never tried to characterise it before. I had always called them by “bubbles” or my “bubble technique”. Knowing what I know now, I thought them more akin to the Pictorialism of over a hundred years ago than anything else. Because of its uniqueness, its etherealness and the way it’s application could magically transform mundanities into fantasy, I almost called it “Magical Pictorialism” but in the end I went for Neo Pictorialism. When I did a google search, to my surprise, it turned out that the term was already in use and I had been indulging in Neo Pictorialism all those years without realising.

The year I became serious about photography, I looked at all the amateur magazines I was reading and thought, I could not compete with the greats of reportage photography and I needed to go down a less trodden path and my first love was saturated colour photography. This coincided with my move from Southall, where I grew up, which is on the outskirts of London, to closer to the centre of the city. I began taking pictures of the tourist spots, which were as new to me as they were to the tourists, and people at leisure in the parks, especially Hyde Park where I often seemed to end up. I was also using many coloured and multiple image filters to try to get an impressionistic view of the city.

My Neo Pictorialism began when I started experimenting with altering the film emulsion. I tried different film stocks and different ways of applying the technique until I came up with an optimum combination. The bubbles, the distortion and the colour shifts appeared all at the same time. I had some control as to where on the frame to apply it but not much. What I liked about it was that it was like alchemy and could turn an ordinary picture into gold but conversely it could totally destroy a good one. I had to work on the originals and many would go in the bin because they disintegrated or they just curled up. I also could not do too many at once because of the noxious fumes the process created.

What I most liked about it was its complete randomness. It could make a virtue of a grey day or simply trash a great picture and I could not predict the outcome. It gives an illustrative or painterly feel and has a lot in common with Pictorialism, which was a photographic movement that reached its height in the early years of the 20th century. They tried to emulate the painting and etching of the time by using sepia toning, heavy darkroom manipulation techniques, exotic printing processes and even etching their prints with fine needles. Alfred Stieglitz and Alvin Langdon Coburn were among its main practitioners. At the time I had never heard of them nor seen their work but when I discovered them, I could see we had a lot in common.

The very next year I did an about face and started practicing what is largely surrealism, which requires quite the opposite talent, that is, concrete precision. It is what I am better known for and many publications have used my style and I have a monograph published of my work.

I rarely used this style for commercial work but employed it on my walks around London and sometimes on my road trips around the UK. I have pictures of the white cliffs of the south coast, bathers on the beaches of Devon and Cornwall, farmers and sheep in the Yorkshire Dales, narrow gauge railways in Wales and so on. I would often end up on the coast in order to see the sea at least once a year. I would drive and stop when I saw something interesting. I did not have to wait for the right light because the technique would possibly ruin the frame anyway. I called them my “holiday snaps” and over the years I would process them as the mood took me and stick them in my files. After nearly thirty years I thought I would haul them out into the light and reassess them. They were always brittle and fragile and just blowing them with compressed air to clean them, as photo labs used to do, could blow a hole in them. I found some of my favourites were damaged with burst bubbles after being squeezed in files all these years and I had to digitally restore some of them.

Alva Bernadine

Alva Bernadine makes photographs and films. By using themes such as surrealism, sexuality and violence, Bernadine touches various overlapping topics and strategies. Several reoccurring subject matters can be recognised, such as mirrors, shadows, optical effects and representations of the female form. The work is filled with invented surreal scenarios, witty events, troubling scenes from movies that were never made and almost hallucinatory images that invoke narrative, prompting you to imagine what came before or what is about to happen. They are not only about desire but the problems that go with it. Bernadine was born in Grenada, West Indies and grew up on the outskirts of London. He won the Vogue/Sotheby’s Cecil Beaton Award as a young photographer and has since worked for many prestigious magazines and became Erotic Photographer of the Year for his first book, Bernadinism: How to Dominate Men and Subjugate Women.

Gallery

SOLO EXHIBITION

EACH MONTH, THE MOST VALUED PROJECT WILL RECEIVE AN INDIVIDUAL EXHIBITION IN OUR GALLERY.

DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2021

PHOTO: © VICKY MARTIN
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/BAnImage.jpg

ImageRights provides intelligent image search and copyright enforcement services to photo agencies and professional photographers worldwide.

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Landscape-and-Nature-dPS-Photography-Course-300x250-1.jpg

Landscape & nature photography is one of the most challenging genres and disciplines to learn, and the costs of getting it wrong can be disappointing

300x250

With ON1 Photo RAW you get the professional photo editing tools every photographer needs to get professional results while keeping your workflow.

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/banner-300.jpg

Call For Entries #18 | After 17 editions and more than 100 published photographers, our print edition has proven to be a simply effective promotional channel.

RELATED STORIES
Tattoo : Illicit Ink  by Tim Franco

AsiaB&WShotTattoo : Illicit Ink by Tim Franco

A series of intimate portraits of the underground tattooist community in South Korea shot on paper negatives. An obscure South Korean law makes tattooing technically illegal.
Soliloquy by Kazunori Nagashima

ConceptSoliloquy by Kazunori Nagashima

The independent modern woman is described in tones of perceptively lyrical and surreal feeling throughout the series, with the mood of the central character filling the air.
Tales of Lemuria by Mitar Terzic

B&WConceptEuropeTales of Lemuria by Mitar Terzic

They say that the Great Flood is threatening; is it possible that we know something about things that already happened?
Suburbia by Thomas H.P. Jerusalem

AmericaB&WShotSuburbia by Thomas H.P. Jerusalem

We shot Suburbia in a smaller town in the Chicago Metropolitan area’s Western Suburbs. Pretty much the opposite of what you would expect doing a streetstyle shoot downtown Chicago.
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/instagram.jpg
Catherine Edelman founder owner of Catherine Edelman Gallery

AmericaDnaCatherine Edelman founder owner of Catherine Edelman Gallery

Catherine Edelman Gallery opened in 1987 quickly establishing itself as one of the leading galleries in the Midwest devoted exclusively to the art of photography.
Chatting with Andrzej Maciejewski

AmericaDnaChatting with Andrzej Maciejewski

I was born and raised in Poland. I also went to photography schools there and in Czech Republic. I moved to Canada when I was 26 and have lived here ever since. While I lived in Toronto I worked for about 10 years as a commercial photographer specializing in architecture.
TRENDING STORIES
Daniel Munteanu ; Transience impressionist photography project

ConceptEuropeDaniel Munteanu ; Transience impressionist photography project

Daniel Munteanu is a visual artist skilled in many digital visual art areas, specializing in fine art staged and studio photography, creative photography and impressionist photography using ICM.
Sicilian Sea by Alex Foolery

B&WEuropeStorySicilian Sea by Alex Foolery

Alex Foolery was born in Catania, Sicily and is now 24 years old. He started photographing in 2010 with an old mobile phone, a Sony Ericsson Z1010, to send multimedia messages that could outweigh the standard of a normal text message.
IDP: Internal Displaced People by Stefan Steinmann

B&WEuropeStoryIDP: Internal Displaced People by Stefan Steinmann

The world is my base and my curiosity my compass. Moments are the fundamental target of my camera. During my journey around the world, I have had lots of different moments but this one was particularly memorable. 
Five minutes with Yoav Friedländer

DnaEuropeFive minutes with Yoav Friedländer

In most of my work I use my toyo 45AII 4”x5” camera along with transparency film. This combination pretty much mirrors my ambivalent approach and work process when producing my work.
The passion of trees by Ali Shokri

AsiaB&WBioThe passion of trees by Ali Shokri

Ali says his work is a reminder that we need to take care of our natural world. As deforestation and the development of roads and dams ate away at the beauty of forests he has loved since childhood, Shokri began using his camera to try and make a difference.
Albinism; Without colors by Antoine Janot

EuropeStoryAlbinism; Without colors by Antoine Janot

In Senegal, 95% of People Living with Albinism die before the age of 30 because of skin cancer. A vast majority of these people are illiterate and forced into begging because of the discrimination and persecution they suffer from.
Afromexican healers by Annick Donkers

FeaturedStoryAfromexican healers by Annick Donkers

At the end of last year my attention was drawn to the coastal region of Guerrero known as Costa Chica, located to the south of Acapulco.
Indian Land For Sale by Donna Garcia

AmericaB&WStoryIndian Land For Sale by Donna Garcia

President Jackson declared that Indian removal would "…Incalculably strengthen the southwestern frontier. Clearing Alabama, Georgia and Mississippi of their Indian populations would enable those states to advance rapidly in population, wealth, and power."
Dubai: Abandoned by Richard Allenby

CityDubai: Abandoned by Richard Allenby

In the year 2017 Dubai was abandoned by all but a small number of Bedouin origin families. Before leaving, the caretakers of the UAE's zoos, wildlife parks and private animal collections opened the gates and cages of their facilities.
FEATURED STORIES
Wildlife photography; Land of Giants by Will Burrard-Lucas

B&WBioEuropeFeaturedWildlife photography; Land of Giants by Will Burrard-Lucas

These photographs are part of a larger series documenting the elephants of Tsavo and the work of Tsavo Trust. The full series is published in a new book titled “Land of Giants”.
Under the sign of the rat; Roger the Rat by Roger Ballen

AmericaB&WConceptFeaturedUnder the sign of the rat; Roger the Rat by Roger Ballen

Surreal, refined, disturbing: Roger Ballen has made a name for himself with his special eye for what is usually considered minor or outside, yet is nevertheless profound and touching.
Intimate portraits of animals; Behind Glass by Anne Berry

B&WBioEuropeFeaturedIntimate portraits of animals; Behind Glass by Anne Berry

Behind Glass is a collection of photographs made in monkey houses of small zoos throughout Europe. Anne Berry is recognized for her ability to create lyrical, intimate portraits of animals.
Fictional narrative photography; Birth Undisturbed by Natalie Lennard

ConceptEuropeFeaturedFictional narrative photography; Birth Undisturbed by Natalie Lennard

Birth Undisturbed is a fictional narrative photography series by Natalie Lennard, that brings scenes of natural childbirth into cinematic fine-art tableaux.
Japanese Aquariums by George Nobechi

AsiaFeaturedStoryJapanese Aquariums by George Nobechi

Japanese Aquariums is a journey into some of my oldest, most treasured childhood memories. Whenever I visited my grandparents in the small, northern Japanese city of Otaru, my grandfather, a high school teacher and an enormous influence in my life, would take me to the aquarium.
Greenland; Stories from the Sea by Camille Michel

EuropeFeaturedStoryGreenland; Stories from the Sea by Camille Michel

Greenland became politically independent from Denmark in 1979 and is slowly getting on the path to economic independency. The ‘ice country’ is currently facing the consequences of climate change.
Intimate diary; Jazz Notes by Giuseppe Cardoni

B&WEuropeFeaturedShotIntimate diary; Jazz Notes by Giuseppe Cardoni

It is a declaration of love by Giuseppe Cardoni, but also by an Italian region, Umbria, which has always hosted the most important jazz festivals and where the author took most of his photographs.
Guatemala; Until the corn Grows Back by Lys Arango

EuropeFeaturedStoryGuatemala; Until the corn Grows Back by Lys Arango

Until the corn Grows Back; Lys Arango’s project was selected and published in our print edition 16. Criminal violence in Central America was something that happened very far away and that explained, according to the media, the gigantic caravans of migrants that from 2017 began to travel thousands of kilometres to reach the United States
Greatest jockeys; Fortza Paris by Marco Cheli

EuropeFeaturedStoryGreatest jockeys; Fortza Paris by Marco Cheli

Fortza Paris; Marco Cheli’s project was selected and published in our print edition 16. Over the years, until today there are many young Sardinians, specifically from Barbagia, who leave their island with the dream of becoming a jockey of the Palio di Siena.
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/getty-images.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/black-eye.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Edelman-Gallery.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Medium.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Opiom.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Filter-Photo.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/head-on.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Photo-independent.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/lagos-photo.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/gtb.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/IPA.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/in-focus.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/image-rights.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/riga.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/BGD.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/ICP.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Mifa.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/miami.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/viewbug.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/OFF.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/KLPA.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/rotterdam.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Photo-Nola.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/clampart.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/dripbook.png
OTHER STORIES
X
stay in touch
Join our mailing list and we'll keep you up to date with all the latest stories, opportunities, calls and more.
We use Sendinblue as our marketing platform. By Clicking below to submit this form, you acknowledge that the information you provided will be transferred to Sendinblue for processing in accordance with their terms of use
We’d love to
Thank you for subscribing!
Submission
Dodho Magazine accepts submissions from emerging and professional photographers from around the world.
Their projects can be published among the best photographers and be viewed by the best professionals in the industry and thousands of photography enthusiasts. Dodho magazine reserves the right to accept or reject any submitted project. Due to the large number of presentations received daily and the need to treat them with the greatest respect and the time necessary for a correct interpretation our average response time is around 5/10 business days in the case of being accepted.
- Between 10/30 images of your best images, in case your project contains a greater number of images which are part of the same indivisible body of work will also be accepted. You must send the images in jpg format to 1200px and 72dpi and quality 9. (No borders or watermarks)
- A short biography along with your photograph. (It must be written in the third person)
- Title and full text of the project with a minimum length of 300 words. (Texts with lesser number of words will not be accepted)
This is the information you need to start preparing your project for its presentation
To send it, you must compress the folder in .ZIP format and use our Wetransfer channel specially dedicated to the reception of works. Links or projects in PDF format will not be accepted. All presentations are carefully reviewed based on their content and final quality of the project or portfolio. If your work is selected for publication in the online version, it will be communicated to you via email and subsequently it will be published.
Issue #14 | September 2020
Current Issue
Vicky Martin
Ryotaro Horiuchi
Susanne Mildeelberg
Diego Bardone
Nicky Hamilton
Alain Schroeder
Printed on 80# matte paper 22x28cm | 100 Pages
Showroom
September 7 to October 31, 2020
Julia Fullerton-Batten
LOOKING OUT FROM WITHIN
Get in touch
How can we help? Got an idea or something you'd like share? Please use the form, or contact hello@dodho.com
Thank You. We will contact you as soon as possible.
Dodho Magazine is pleased to announce the new call for the photographers selection from all over the world that will be presented in an exceptional edition.
Deadline: Monday, November 30, 2020
Photo by ©Ryotaro Horiuchi | Japan | Issue#14
Dodho Magazine is pleased to announce the new call for the photographers selection from all over the world that will be presented in an exceptional edition.
Deadline: Monday, November 30, 2020
Photo by ©Ryotaro Horiuchi | Japan | Issue#14
CALL
FOR ENTRIES
Dodho Magazine is pleased to announce the new call for the photographers selection from all over the world that will be presented in an exceptional edition.
Are you ready?
Deadline: Monday, November 30, 2020
Contact
How can we help? Got an idea or something you'd like share? Please use the adjacent form, or contact contact@dodho.com
Thank You. We will contact you as soon as possible.
Submission
Dodho Magazine accepts submissions from emerging and professional photographers from around the world.
Their projects can be published among the best photographers and be viewed by the best professionals in the industry and thousands of photography enthusiasts. Dodho magazine reserves the right to accept or reject any submitted project. Due to the large number of presentations received daily and the need to treat them with the greatest respect and the time necessary for a correct interpretation our average response time is around 5/10 business days in the case of being accepted. This is the information you need to start preparing your project for its presentation.
To send it, you must compress the folder in .ZIP format and use our Wetransfer channel specially dedicated to the reception of works. Links or projects in PDF format will not be accepted. All presentations are carefully reviewed based on their content and final quality of the project or portfolio. If your work is selected for publication in the online version, it will be communicated to you via email and subsequently it will be published.
NEW!
FOLLOW US.
Subscribe now and get a free access to a curated list of resources.
Feel free to contact.
2017 (C) All rights reserved.
ghfd