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AsiaStoryThe Rohingyas: A People Without A Home by Probal Rashid

The new arrivals are scattered in different locations in south-eastern Bangladesh. More than 30,000 Rohingya are estimated to have sought shelter in the existing refugee camps of Kutupalong and Nayapara.

According to the United Nations estimates about 500,000 Rohingya people have fled from violence in Myanmar since August 25, 2017.

The latest surge brings the total number to 587,000 Rohingya who have sought refuge in Bangladesh since October last year.

The new arrivals are scattered in different locations in south-eastern Bangladesh. More than 30,000 Rohingya are estimated to have sought shelter in the existing refugee camps of Kutupalong and Nayapara. Many others are living in makeshift sites and local villages.

Rohingyas began to flee from military oppression—first in 1978 and then again in 1991-92—in major influxes of some 500,000 people. Presently, around 32,000 registered refugees stay in the UNHCR-run camps in Cox’s Bazar, while another estimated 500,000 unregistered live outside the camps. Consequently, most of the unregistered refugees are deemed underprivileged according to the scale of basic human rights. The Bangladeshi government has accommodated the Rohingyas to a certain point, but considering limited resources as well as the poor conditions its own population lives under, it is hardly in a position to resolve the issue on its own.The Rohingya refugee issue has been a long-standing problem and, unfortunately, the international community has remained mostly mute, unwilling to play a role in helping to resolve the problem. More than 35 years since it began, the Rohingyas’ crisis is long overdue for a solution.

Rohingya Muslims who fled from recent violence in Myanmar, walk in the rain after crossing the Bangladesh-Myanmar border in Teknaf, Bangladesh, September 3, 2017.

About Probal Rashid

Probal Rashid is a documentary photographer and photojournalist working in Bangladesh, represented by Zuma Press, USA. He has a Post Graduate Diploma in Photojournalism from Konrad Adenauer Asian Center for Journalism (ACFJ) at Ateneo De Manila University, Philippines funded by World Press Photo. Probal also holds an MBA.

His works have been published in many national and international newspapers and magazines such as the Los Angeles Times, Huffington Post, Newsweek, Wired, Forbes, GEO, National Geographic, Days Japan, Paris Match, Wall Street Journal, Stern, Telegraph, Focus magazine and the Guardian. Moreover, his photographs have been exhibited in Bangladesh, Germany, Japan, Thailand, Malaysia, UK, USA and some of his works selected by the Kiyosato Museum of Photographic Arts for their permanent collection.

Probal is the recipient of numerous awards for his work including the Pictures Of the Year International (POYi), Days Japan Photojournalism Award, China International Press Photo Award (CHIPP), NPPA’s Best of Photojournalism Awards, Yonhap International Press Photo Awards, KL International Photo award, FCCT/OnAsia Photojournalism, “Zoom-in on Poverty” Global Photo Award, CGAP microfinance photo award, WPGA Annual Pollux Awards in U.K, International Year of Biodiversity Award and the Atlanta Photojournalism Seminar Contest. [Official Website]

Monwara Khatun, 55, is being carried on bamboo by her sons. After fleeing recent violence in Myanmar, they walk on a muddy path after crossing the Bangladesh-Myanmar border in Teknaf, Bangladesh, September 3, 2017.

Rohingya Muslims who fled from recent violence in Myanmar are exhausted after crossing the Bangladesh-Myanmar border in Naikhongchhari, Bandarban, September 3, 2017.

A Bangladeshi villager offers water while Rohingya refugees arrive in Tekhnaf, Bangladesh, September 4, 2017.

Jahura Begum from Myanmar who has crossed the border into Bangladesh on 4 September, after three days of walking to escape violence in her village. The journey to Bangladesh was hard, especially with the little kids. The road was muddy and she had to walk through thick forest and jungle. Teknaf, Cox’s bazar. September 4, 2017.

Kalimullah, 32, is a tractor driver who fled from recent violence in Myanmar, shows a wound from where the Burmese military shot him. Teknaf, Bangladesh, September 3, 2017.

A distressed mother named Noor Bahar(80) who fled from ongoing violence over Muslims in Myanmar; takes shelter on a roadside in Teknaf, Bangladesh. September 2, 2017.

Mustakima and her brother Eliyas cry as the Border Guard Bangladesh (BGB) temporarily holds them after crossing the Bangladesh-Myanmar border in Naikhongchhari, Bandarban, September 3, 2017.

Rohingya Muslims from Myanmar who have crossed the border into Bangladesh on 4 September after days of walking to escape violence in their villages. Teknaf, Cox’s bazar.

Rohingya Muslims build new shelters in Balukhali refugee camp, Cox’s bazar, Bangladesh. September 4, 2017

Mahmuda Begum, 35, who fled from violence in Myanmar, sits next to her children in Kutupalang refugee cam after crossing the Bangladesh-Myanmar border in Teknaf, 2 September 2017.

A refugee woman and her five children share a plate of rice for lunch at a makeshift cam near Kutupalong refugees cam in Cox’s bazar. Food security is a daily challenge for Rohingya refugees and many children suffer from malnutrition. September 4, 2017.

A Rohingya woman cooks food outside her makeshift home in Kutupalong newly expanded Refugee Camp. September 3, 2017.

A Rohingya girl sleeps on a plastic mat at a makeshift camp near Kutupalong refugee camp in Cox’s bazar. September 2017.

Nasima Khatun, 45, who fled from ongoing violence in Myanmar, shows her Myanmar savings money which is now worthless in Bangladesh. Teknaf, Cox’s bazar, September 2017.

Bangladeshi social activists organize a demonstration in capital Dhaka against the recent violence toward Muslims in Myanmar. September 11, 2017.

Rafika, 10, holding her younger sister Noor Kalima. They fled with their parents from recent violence in Myanmar. September 2017. Teknaf, Bangladesh.

Rohingya refugees, who fled from recent violence in Myanmar, stretch their hands for food near Balukhali in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, September 4, 2017.

Rohingya women walk through a shallow canal after collecting their supplies in Teknaf, Bangladesh. September 2017.

Rohingya children who fled from Myanmar, stand in the newly expended Kutupalong refugee camp. They have seen how the Burmese military tortured their parents and burned their houses. September 5, 2017, Cox’s bazar.

Rohingya Muslims, who fled from recent violence in Myanmar, enter the no man’s land on a hill in Teknaf. September 2017.



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