AmericaStoryLooking at Looking essay by Max Hirshfeld

One perceives the world through the manifold of the senses and vision constitutes a fundamental way in which we process this world. Our individual interpretations of the visual experience provide unique perceptions for each of us.

One perceives the world through the manifold of the senses and vision constitutes a fundamental way in which we process this world.

Our individual interpretations of the visual experience provide unique perceptions for each of us. Not everyone pays attention to the same thing and it is what people choose to look at that is the variable of life.

As a photographer Max Hirshfeld takes on the role of looking for us, through his lens he directs us. In his series “Looking at Looking”, Hirshfeld presents the narrative of people looking at art. Looking may seem like such a simple act, however Hirshfeld reveals its depth and complexity.

Looking at Looking essay | Max Hirshfeld
Looking at Looking essay | Max Hirshfeld

Hirshfeld brilliantly moves through the structured space of the museum as Winogrand moved through the streets of America. He brings the serendipity of street photography inside, using the snapshot aesthetic to portray a sense of realism. The seeming casualness to his photographs is actually quite calculated and his anticipated spontaneity enables Hirshfeld to create this narrative of looking. His decisive moments capture not the art but the state of mind of his museum subjects engaged in looking and in thought. He visually records that intangible internal moment — the internal dialogue of subject to object, viewer to art — and makes it an eternal moment.

A museum is the quintessential milieu in which to observe this element of human existence. In the simplest terms, a museum exists to collect, to preserve and to present objects for visitors to look at and experience. The audience is limited to just looking and there is a certain etiquette in looking — not too close and definitely no touching. This perpetuates an often-humorous dance of the viewer around the artwork.

Hirshfeld captures a diversity of viewers and their interplay of looking as they move through the vast selection of artwork. Visitors peruse, stop at one painting, pass by another, linger, and even photograph the works of art. Hirshfeld is not the only one in the museum with a camera, yet his intent is not to focus on the artwork. This fact enables Hirshfeld the freedom to photograph and to go unnoticed in his looking. Cleverly Hirshfeld suggests that he may not be the only one looking at visitors looking. The portrait by Cezanne peers down upon the museum visitor who looks off to the left, focused on something out of the frame. The subjects in the art on the museum walls look at the museum-goers, even if the visitor decides not to look.

Looking at Looking essay | Max Hirshfeld
Looking at Looking essay | Max Hirshfeld

The people in the museum assume the paintings and sculptures are on display. But they are objects on display in Hirshfeld’s photographs. There is a false sense of privacy inherent in public space. Take, for example, the young couple comfortably consumed by Pissarro’s painting of Paris.  They embrace each other and share a tender moment together. Unknowingly, the moment is shared with Hirshfeld as well.

Looking at Looking essay | Max Hirshfeld
Looking at Looking essay | Max Hirshfeld

Hirshfeld too is consumed by his own looking. Within a zone of controlled creativity and improvisation, he orchestrates harmony out of a continuous cacophony of movement. To use a term suggested by William S. Burroughs, Hirshfeld is the “creative observer” who points out fleeting connections of offbeat harmony:

Nothing exists until or unless it is observed. An artist is making something exist by observing it. And his hope for other people is that they will also make it exist by observing it. I call it ‘creative observation.

This creative observation by Hirshfeld threads together a unique and playful vision. As a jazz musician who expresses melody in an atonal scale, Hirshfeld synthesizes his lens of perception and interpretation.

Hirshfeld also plays with the idea that art is a commodity up for consumption. Just looking is sometimes not enough for these museum-goers. They often relate to the artwork by photographing it themselves. In plate #30, a father snaps a photo of his son in front of a Pollock painting seemingly not even getting the whole painting in the camera frame but rather creating an abstract background in which to frame his son. What is the father’s intent? Does photographing the art make it more accessible? Is it proof of having been there and seen it? Does the photo of the artwork represent the real thing? Or is it less about the artwork and more about obtaining and remembering the moment, the moment of being there, the moment of looking?

Looking at Looking essay | Max Hirshfeld
Looking at Looking essay | Max Hirshfeld

It is this moment of looking, connecting and experiencing on whatever level and in whatever way that Hirshfeld showcases in his work. Now as you view these photographs in the intimate space of this book or within the public space of a gallery you mirror the viewers looking at art in Hirshfeld’s photographs. As you look are you conscious of your own looking? Or does the object on which you are focused consume your consciousness? If for a moment you refocus on what you are doing instead of what you are looking at, you may realize you cannot concentrate on both at the same time. Sartre would suggest in Being and Nothingness, that you can never really capture your own act of capturing. You may have a mystical awareness of your consciousness but it forever flees from objective grasp. Hirshfeld succeeds in glancing at that moment in which a person’s consciousness joins with its object. He exposes the self immersed in experience and ultimately his work may lead us to contemplate that which we never see: our own act of looking. [Text: Larissa Leclair]

Looking at Looking essay | Max Hirshfeld
Looking at Looking essay | Max Hirshfeld

About Max Hirshfeld

Max grew up in a house full of books and music, to parents who survived the Holocaust and ended up settling in small-town Alabama. His father, a child prodigy who first performed with The Warsaw Philharmonic, prodded Max to embrace the arts and suffused their home with the curiosity born of generations of rigorous intellectual and artistic pursuits.

Six years as a staff photographer with The Smithsonian Institution and a career-altering week at the University of Missouri photojournalism workshop in 1977 propelled Max into over fifteen years of commercial photography before a trip to Poland (accompanying his mother on her first return in 46 years) gave him a new appreciation for the power of photography and added a new dimension to his work.

Max’s images show a strong respect for the great traditions of documentary photography wedded to a deep love of humanity. Over thirty years of advertising and editorial photography in the studio and on location coupled with his vibrant yet emotional personal work has made Max one of the best photographers working today. His work has been featured in Rolling Stone, GQ, Time, Forbes and Vanity Fair and in advertising campaigns for Amtrak, Johnson & Johnson, Ikea and The US Mint. [Official Website]

Looking at Looking essay | Max Hirshfeld
Looking at Looking essay | Max Hirshfeld

Looking at Looking essay | Max Hirshfeld
Looking at Looking essay | Max Hirshfeld

NGA #19 NGA #30 NGA #31 NGA #36 NGA #37 NGA #38 NGA #41 NGA 44 NGA #60 NGA #67 NGA #70 NGA #80 NGA #88 NGA #89 NGA #91

Looking at Looking essay | Max Hirshfeld
Looking at Looking essay | Max Hirshfeld

Looking at Looking essay | Max Hirshfeld
Looking at Looking essay | Max Hirshfeld

Looking at Looking essay | Max Hirshfeld
Looking at Looking essay | Max Hirshfeld

Looking at Looking essay | Max Hirshfeld
Looking at Looking essay | Max Hirshfeld

Gallery

SOLO EXHIBITION

EACH MONTH, THE MOST VALUED PROJECT WILL RECEIVE AN INDIVIDUAL EXHIBITION IN OUR GALLERY.

DEADLINE: SUNDAY, AUGUST 15, 2021

PHOTO: © ALAIN SCHROEDER
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/BAnImage.jpg

ImageRights provides intelligent image search and copyright enforcement services to photo agencies and professional photographers worldwide.

300x250

With ON1 Photo RAW you get the professional photo editing tools every photographer needs to get professional results while keeping your workflow.

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/magazine_dodho_mostly_white_300x250.jpg

GuruShots is a platform for people who love taking photos. Get ready to push your creativity and enter your shots in the ‘Mostly White’ photo challenge!

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/banner-300.jpg

Call For Entries #18 | After 17 editions and more than 100 published photographers, our print edition has proven to be a simply effective promotional channel.

RELATED STORIES
Iceland, Eyjafjallajökull

BioIceland, Eyjafjallajökull

So I saw all of these pictures of that volcano in Iceland nobody can pronounce the name of, so I figured I should go and do something that is not news footage but something more cinematic.
Elements of the chaotic world; Duality by Madison Dinelle

AmericaB&WConceptElements of the chaotic world; Duality by Madison Dinelle

Any meaning is only capable of containing a partial truth, so I try to take pictures devout of all meaning; I don’t want there to be an identifiable time, space, theme, personality, event or statement. In that sense, I’m trying to take pictures of nothing
Street Photography by Paul-Olivier Doury

CityStreet Photography by Paul-Olivier Doury

Paul-Olivier Doury is a French photographer born in 1964 in Bourges, who’s been working for advertising agencies for 30 years in Paris. Beside his professional work he developped a personnal approach on photography through a first research on the movement with images taken in Japan and NYC.
Hellerau by Stefanie Minzenmay

ConceptEuropeHellerau by Stefanie Minzenmay

Hellerau Festival Theatre, built in 1911 as a school of Rhythmics, is today the location of HELLERAU – European Centre for the Arts, Dresden. Following an eventful history – in the 1930s it served as a military camp; later the Soviet army used it as their barracks
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/instagram.jpg
Terry Etherton – Director of the Etherton Gallery

AmericaDnaTerry Etherton – Director of the Etherton Gallery

Etherton Gallery was founded in 1981. In Tucson, Arizona. We specialize in 19th, 20th century and contemporary photography and other media.
Jeff Alu ; Between documentary and a semi-dreamlike state

AmericaB&WConceptJeff Alu ; Between documentary and a semi-dreamlike state

My shooting style is very spontaneous. Very rarely do I plan anything out, and it’s the element of surprise and discovery that drives me forward. While I do enjoy traveling distances to obtain my shots,
TRENDING STORIES
African tribes ; Mursi People by Svetlin Yosifov

B&WEuropeStoryAfrican tribes ; Mursi People by Svetlin Yosifov

The African tribe of Mursi people is isolated in Omo valley - South Ethiopia near the border with Sudan. They are one of the most fascinating tribes in Africa with their lives being a combination of brutal reality and amazing beauty.
It is always light under the ground by Valentin Sidorenko

ConceptEuropeIt is always light under the ground by Valentin Sidorenko

I close my eyes and I see how my mother would tuck me in bed when father had come back from work. He froze in the doorway and his face was red from blood.
The murky corners of the human soul by Alex Lobo

B&WConceptEuropeThe murky corners of the human soul by Alex Lobo

Art is for me a way of transforming reality with an expressive purpose. My favourite artworks are those that use the expressive tools of the chosen media form (in this case, photography) to materialize a very subjective vision of the human experience
Still Beating by Tom Chambers

AmericaConceptFeaturedStill Beating by Tom Chambers

Narrative Art refers to visual imagery which tells stories, engages the imagination, and stirs the emotions. These stories transcend culture and are relatable to all.
Jungle of Papua; Korowais by Martin Gros

EuropeStoryJungle of Papua; Korowais by Martin Gros

The Korowais, a society company at the ancient culture in which we live in the trees of a forest that protects and nourishes. Discovered in 1974, the semi-nomadic tribe operates in near autarky in the dense jungle of Papua.
67P By Florence Iff

ConceptEurope67P By Florence Iff

It explores the mission of orbiter “Rosetta," which set out in 2004 to investigate a comet named 67P. Rosetta reached the comet 10 years later, in 2014, and sent back detailed information about the comet before ending its mission by hitting the comet's surface in a controlled maneuver.
Suspension by Damien Berney

B&WEuropeShotSuspension by Damien Berney

We live at present in a society where we do not take time any more. The consumption gives rhythm to our everyday life and our desire to acquire new goods in quantities always more important, grows day to day.
Men at work by Amlan Sanyal

AsiaB&WStoryMen at work by Amlan Sanyal

Add to that the damage caused by ‘extreme and treacherous’ weather. We all know how we get when the work isn’t carried out, moaning about tyre damage due to pot holes, potential crashes due to unclear road markings.
Winner Volume 2 – Wendy Hudnall

AmericaBioWinner Volume 2 – Wendy Hudnall

Wendy Hudnall is a photographer specializing in Fine Art Landscapes. Born, raised and living in Los Angeles, her work primarily centers on California and the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range. She prides herself on being a visual storyteller
FEATURED STORIES
Under the sign of the rat; Roger the Rat by Roger Ballen

AmericaB&WConceptFeaturedUnder the sign of the rat; Roger the Rat by Roger Ballen

Surreal, refined, disturbing: Roger Ballen has made a name for himself with his special eye for what is usually considered minor or outside, yet is nevertheless profound and touching.
Intimate portraits of animals; Behind Glass by Anne Berry

B&WBioEuropeFeaturedIntimate portraits of animals; Behind Glass by Anne Berry

Behind Glass is a collection of photographs made in monkey houses of small zoos throughout Europe. Anne Berry is recognized for her ability to create lyrical, intimate portraits of animals.
Fictional narrative photography; Birth Undisturbed by Natalie Lennard

ConceptEuropeFeaturedFictional narrative photography; Birth Undisturbed by Natalie Lennard

Birth Undisturbed is a fictional narrative photography series by Natalie Lennard, that brings scenes of natural childbirth into cinematic fine-art tableaux.
Japanese Aquariums by George Nobechi

AsiaFeaturedStoryJapanese Aquariums by George Nobechi

Japanese Aquariums is a journey into some of my oldest, most treasured childhood memories. Whenever I visited my grandparents in the small, northern Japanese city of Otaru, my grandfather, a high school teacher and an enormous influence in my life, would take me to the aquarium.
Greenland; Stories from the Sea by Camille Michel

EuropeFeaturedStoryGreenland; Stories from the Sea by Camille Michel

Greenland became politically independent from Denmark in 1979 and is slowly getting on the path to economic independency. The ‘ice country’ is currently facing the consequences of climate change.
Intimate diary; Jazz Notes by Giuseppe Cardoni

B&WEuropeFeaturedShotIntimate diary; Jazz Notes by Giuseppe Cardoni

It is a declaration of love by Giuseppe Cardoni, but also by an Italian region, Umbria, which has always hosted the most important jazz festivals and where the author took most of his photographs.
Guatemala; Until the corn Grows Back by Lys Arango

EuropeFeaturedStoryGuatemala; Until the corn Grows Back by Lys Arango

Until the corn Grows Back; Lys Arango’s project was selected and published in our print edition 16. Criminal violence in Central America was something that happened very far away and that explained, according to the media, the gigantic caravans of migrants that from 2017 began to travel thousands of kilometres to reach the United States
Greatest jockeys; Fortza Paris by Marco Cheli

EuropeFeaturedStoryGreatest jockeys; Fortza Paris by Marco Cheli

Fortza Paris; Marco Cheli’s project was selected and published in our print edition 16. Over the years, until today there are many young Sardinians, specifically from Barbagia, who leave their island with the dream of becoming a jockey of the Palio di Siena.
Africa; River Blindness by Marcus Trappaud Bjørn

B&WEuropeFeaturedShotAfrica; River Blindness by Marcus Trappaud Bjørn

The project River blindness focuses on a neglected tropical disease, which is the second most common cause of infectious blindness worldwide.
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/getty-images.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/black-eye.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Edelman-Gallery.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Medium.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Opiom.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Filter-Photo.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/head-on.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Photo-independent.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/lagos-photo.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/gtb.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/IPA.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/in-focus.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/image-rights.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/riga.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/BGD.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/ICP.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Mifa.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/miami.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/viewbug.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/OFF.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/KLPA.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/rotterdam.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Photo-Nola.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/clampart.png
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/dripbook.png
OTHER STORIES
X
stay in touch
Join our mailing list and we'll keep you up to date with all the latest stories, opportunities, calls and more.
We use Sendinblue as our marketing platform. By Clicking below to submit this form, you acknowledge that the information you provided will be transferred to Sendinblue for processing in accordance with their terms of use
We’d love to
Thank you for subscribing!
Submission
Dodho Magazine accepts submissions from emerging and professional photographers from around the world.
Their projects can be published among the best photographers and be viewed by the best professionals in the industry and thousands of photography enthusiasts. Dodho magazine reserves the right to accept or reject any submitted project. Due to the large number of presentations received daily and the need to treat them with the greatest respect and the time necessary for a correct interpretation our average response time is around 5/10 business days in the case of being accepted.
- Between 10/30 images of your best images, in case your project contains a greater number of images which are part of the same indivisible body of work will also be accepted. You must send the images in jpg format to 1200px and 72dpi and quality 9. (No borders or watermarks)
- A short biography along with your photograph. (It must be written in the third person)
- Title and full text of the project with a minimum length of 300 words. (Texts with lesser number of words will not be accepted)
This is the information you need to start preparing your project for its presentation
To send it, you must compress the folder in .ZIP format and use our Wetransfer channel specially dedicated to the reception of works. Links or projects in PDF format will not be accepted. All presentations are carefully reviewed based on their content and final quality of the project or portfolio. If your work is selected for publication in the online version, it will be communicated to you via email and subsequently it will be published.
Issue #14 | September 2020
Current Issue
Vicky Martin
Ryotaro Horiuchi
Susanne Mildeelberg
Diego Bardone
Nicky Hamilton
Alain Schroeder
Printed on 80# matte paper 22x28cm | 100 Pages
Showroom
September 7 to October 31, 2020
Julia Fullerton-Batten
LOOKING OUT FROM WITHIN
Get in touch
How can we help? Got an idea or something you'd like share? Please use the adjacent form, or contact contact@dodho.com
Thank You. We will contact you as soon as possible.
Dodho Magazine is pleased to announce the new call for the photographers selection from all over the world that will be presented in an exceptional edition.
Deadline: Monday, November 30, 2020
Photo by ©Ryotaro Horiuchi | Japan | Issue#14
Dodho Magazine is pleased to announce the new call for the photographers selection from all over the world that will be presented in an exceptional edition.
Deadline: Monday, November 30, 2020
Photo by ©Ryotaro Horiuchi | Japan | Issue#14
CALL
FOR ENTRIES
Dodho Magazine is pleased to announce the new call for the photographers selection from all over the world that will be presented in an exceptional edition.
Are you ready?
Deadline: Monday, November 30, 2020
Contact
How can we help? Got an idea or something you'd like share? Please use the adjacent form, or contact contact@dodho.com
Thank You. We will contact you as soon as possible.
Submission
Dodho Magazine accepts submissions from emerging and professional photographers from around the world.
Their projects can be published among the best photographers and be viewed by the best professionals in the industry and thousands of photography enthusiasts. Dodho magazine reserves the right to accept or reject any submitted project. Due to the large number of presentations received daily and the need to treat them with the greatest respect and the time necessary for a correct interpretation our average response time is around 5/10 business days in the case of being accepted. This is the information you need to start preparing your project for its presentation.
To send it, you must compress the folder in .ZIP format and use our Wetransfer channel specially dedicated to the reception of works. Links or projects in PDF format will not be accepted. All presentations are carefully reviewed based on their content and final quality of the project or portfolio. If your work is selected for publication in the online version, it will be communicated to you via email and subsequently it will be published.
NEW!
FOLLOW US.
Subscribe now and get a free access to a curated list of resources.
Feel free to contact.
2017 (C) All rights reserved.
ghfd