Interview with Svetlin Yosifov ; Finalist in our Black & White 2019

When I started to pick up photography, I learnt to shoot many genres, from macro, landscape, night scape, long exposure, street photography… slowly I noticed capturing images related with human elements is very challenging yet fulfilling. 
Svetlin Yosifov

SVETLIN YOSIFOV, FINALIST AND PUBLISHED IN OUR BLACK & WHITE 2019

Svetlin Yosifov travel photographer from Bulgaria.

Not a professional freelance photographer.I define myself as a travel-documentary-art photographer. Almost 20 years now photography has been part of my life. My passion is catching street portraits and trying to figure out my object’s character. Point of interest – traditions in primal and natural places like India, Ethiopia, Kenya, Indonesia, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Cuba and more. I consider good photography to be much more that a snapshot or a memory, it is something that tells a story, strong enough to influence the world we live in and raise more awareness. Throughout the years my interviews and photographs have been published in many magazines and websites. [Official Website]

Svetlin Yosifov

I’d like to begin by complementing you on such a unique and inspiring body of work. One of my favourites from this edition. What strikes me the most when I initially saw this collection was the application of white paint across various characters. Is the application of paint something which has to be earned as a tribesman or tribeswoman over a certain period of time and does it define the various personalities of individuals within the community?

First of all, I would like to thank you for the opportunity to show my work in the worldwide magazine Dodho, as well as to be part of your photographic community. Africa is a continent of diversity – culture, traditions, languages and different ways of seeing and knowing beauty. This comes as a shock to most of us, living in the modern world with different ideas and perception of reality.

The “Mursi” tribe is not one of the most popular in Africa but is one of the most aggressive and violent ones, when it comes to tribal conflicts. Throughout the years, this has definitively left a mark on their behavior and looks. The tribal make-up plays a crucial part in the everyday life and used, according to their needs, in different occasions – hunting, weddings, funerals and scaring of the enemies. Make-up is also a social mark, used to distinguish male from female and people from the tribe from other tribes and communities. Mursi people make the paint, my mixing clay and dried flowers, thus creating different shades. Often, if needed, they use animal excrements. The white color for them means hope, pureness and light! 

You mentioned that you lived among them during this shoot. Could you elaborate on this experience and what type of activates or role did you play within the tribe? Were you ever invited on a hunt or join certain gatherings?

Whatever stories you might have heard about the “Mursi” tribe, they are always welcoming and ready for a nice conversation. They are happy to make a camp for you right next to their homes. Every night, during my seven day stay there they lit up a fire for me, I was asked to join them, sit with them and talk with them with the help of my guide as a translator. In the light of the fire a man starts singing, seconds after that many others join him. This reminded me of a slavery song with lots of pain and sorrow in it. Bonding with the tribe is very important for my shoots. That is why I start taking photos on the second day

© Svetlin Yosifov

This body of work is part of a bigger collection of images taken around Ethiopia. How does this tribes’ traditions and customs differ from that of other tribes which you have visited? 

In 2018 I had my first Ethiopian expedition. I visited almost every tribe in the Omo Valley national park and as a result, made about 70 photos published in the album “Ethiopian tribes expedition” 2018. There I show photos of tribes like Hammer, Arbore, Mursi, Dassanech and Karo. Each tribe has a unique way of life and traditions. But the tribe with the biggest mark on my eyes and soul was the Mursi tribe, not because they cut off their lips and ears, but because in the eyes of each and every single one of them ,I can read “I am proud to be Mursi!”. 

© Svetlin Yosifov

The scarification of one’s body seems to be a recurring factor throughout this project, was this something common in all the tribes that you visited and if so, were you ever invited to do the same or something similar?

Oh, of course I was! ..☺ I was also offered to be cut with a knife or thorn. My guide told me that “scars are a sign of beauty within the tribe”, but I told him that I am handsome enough!

The scarification aren’t just any scars, they’re an elaborate part of local culture and signify everything from beauty to adulthood or even, in some cases, are simply a mark of belonging.

This project focuses specifically on portraiture. Was this your intention from the start, to focus only on the individuals in the tribe? Because the images themselves seem to successfully dance around the idea that they might or might not be staged. The image of the bald old man with the gun for instance is a perfect example of this balance of emotions? 

Photographers who have already visited the national park of Omo Valley in Ethiopia know that this is a hard place for shooting. This goes mainly for the Mursi tribe, as they live in a distinct area with no streets, houses or whatever structure of living. They are organized in small groups of 3 to 10 families and are always on the move for food and according to the seasons. They long for people with cameras, because this way they can get money to buy food. Thus, want many photos in order to earn more. Throughout the years they have learned to be models- some good, some bad. This was definitively a challenge for me, since I don’t like orchestrated photos.  If you mean the “Warrior, Mursi tribe photo”- it is one of my favorites. No orchestration in this one. He was just sitting in front of the fire and I took the shot. During my last visit in 2019 I tried to find this man and thank him, but they said he either died or was in jail.

Amazing people, amazing personalities and a constant fight for life and survival this is the Mursi tribe. I wish every single photographer the luck to go there, visit Mursi and express their vision of the wild lands of Ethiopia.

© Svetlin Yosifov

I was wondering if you could elaborate on this idea of the “illusion”. You stated that living among them gave you a sense of “extreme authenticity”, however could you expand on this idea of the illusion while living with this tribe?  

It’s in every photographer’s style to have a little amount of “illusion”. This is our way to see the invisible in a shot and show it in our own style, which is always a hunch away from reality. Here, is an example: A photographer dresses a beautiful girl as a nun. Through his pictures he expresses purity and perfection, but the model is not all that in reality, is it? When I take a shot, I imagine the perfect moment before that. I focus my attention on the details, the eyes, the chest, sometimes the background, the things that the model is holding in their hands and then build the overall impression of the shot. All of this helps the observer to orient himself in this main idea. I like creating illusions. I am sure that everyone who liked a photo of mine, understood it and there is a great chance that it turned out as a mutual illusion and why not even a dream?

© Svetlin Yosifov

Francesco Scalici

A recent MA graduate from the University of Lincoln, Francesco has now focused on landscape photography as the basis of his photographic platform. An author for DODHO magazine, Francesco’s interest in documentary photography has turned to writing and has had various articles, interviews and book reviews published on platforms such as: ‘All About Photo.com’, ‘Float Magazine’ and ‘Life Framer Magazine’. Currently on a photographic internship, Francesco has most recently been involved in the making of a short film titled: ‘No One Else’, directed by Pedro Sanchez Román and produced my Martin Nuza.

More Stories

Interview with Ann Prochilo; published in our print edition #20

Interview with Ann Prochilo; published in our print edition #20

Ann Prochilo brings extraordinary dreams of mixed elements, and thoughtful reflections to her images, being in the intersection of different worlds but still connected to her roots. Her surprising works are the result of a striking and complex process of work and way of thinking while trying to have her feet on the ground with everyday questioning about which is her place in the universe.
Interview with Sara Camporesi; published in our print edition #20

Interview with Sara Camporesi; published in our print edition #20

A photographer passionate about art, for a long time she has combined this interest with the spontaneity of visual storytelling, conceived not only as a classic account of experiences but as a combination of personal and creative shots conveys the secret appeal of urban places and museums, revealed through images and words like a “photographer narrator”.
As I See It by Lori Pond

As I See It by Lori Pond

"As I See It” is a series that examines and reproduces the fact (according to neurological studies I've read) that our brains, as a survival mechanism, can only process a few things at a time.

Color Awards

We invite you to participate in the first edition
of the Color Awards. We are looking
for the best color picture for this year, 2022.

The competition is open to any interpretation of color photography
in all its dimensions, from everyday reality
to pure abstraction

DEADLINE | FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2022

PHOTO BY © DANIIL KONTOROVICH
Exclusive Interview with Demi Cauwenbergh

Exclusive Interview with Demi Cauwenbergh

We had the honor to interview exclusively with the photographer Demi Cauwenbergh, winner of the Rotterdam Photo Best Exhibition Award. A collection of self-portraits that she have made over the course of 5 years, and it is still ongoing. she started making self-portraits in 2017 as a way to be really personal.
Paddy drying processes in manual mode by Shaibal Nandi

Paddy drying processes in manual mode by Shaibal Nandi

The drying of paddy is the most important part of making rice from raw paddy. In rural India, poor people still follow the manual process of drying raw paddy before taking those dried paddy into husking mill for milling.
Indigenous communities; Jaguar by Camila Berrio

Indigenous communities; Jaguar by Camila Berrio

Getting into the jungle takes several days; understanding the rhythm of life of the indigenous communities that live there requires much more. During the months that I spent with them, I had the opportunity to contemplate how life is being woven by the skillful hands of indigenous women who, in each backpack and in each seam, express their sadness, joy, hope and frustration.

Featured Stories

Kushti, Indian wrestling by Alain Schroeder

Kushti, Indian wrestling by Alain Schroeder

Kushti is the traditional form of Indian wrestling established centuries ago in Persia. In vogue during the 16th century Mughal era, this art is practiced in a type of gymnasium called an Akhara.
The Tribal Heartland of India by Tania Chatterjee

The Tribal Heartland of India by Tania Chatterjee

Bastar is the tribal heartland and treasure trove of ancient Indian culture. Today Bastar, is a part of the State of Chhattisgarh, India. It is a land of undiscovered surprises, with mysterious forests, breath-taking waterfalls
Lov’yer by Marta Kochanek

Lov’yer by Marta Kochanek

The world witnesses love between people of all nationalities and races. This planet gives room to those attracted to people of the same, opposite and both genders. It is how this world is constructed. It is how it always was.
Gabriel Isak ; Experiences of the soul

Gabriel Isak ; Experiences of the soul

His imagery entails surreal and melancholic scenes inspired by the inner world of dreams and psychology, where he invites the viewer to interact with the internal world of solitary figures
It´s just love by Sophie Ebrard

It´s just love by Sophie Ebrard

Pornography is the largest and most profitable market in the world today. However, the industry and its works are still subject to widespread scrutiny and taboo.
Conversations by Philip and Caroline Pegden

Conversations by Philip and Caroline Pegden

It is often assumed that people in large cities are incommunicado and more so now, in a world dominated by social media, played out on the handsets of smart phones. However, this series of photographs highlights that social communication is irrepressible.
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/color-banner.jpg

We invite you to participate in the first edition of the Color Awards. We are eager to see photograhs with new focus points and innovative approaches

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/BAnImage.jpg

ImageRights provides intelligent image search and copyright enforcement services to photo agencies and professional photographers worldwide.

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/banner.jpg

The book where words and images meet to never leave each other, The book contains 20 evocative paintings; each of them is a double page. 56 printed pages | 235x165mm

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/banner22.jpg

Call For Entries #21 | After 20 editions and more than 100 published photographers, our print edition has proven to be a simply effective promotional channel.

Climbing Cholitas by Todd Antony

Climbing Cholitas by Todd Antony

I´m originally from New Zealand but have been living and working as a photographer in London for the last 15 years. Growing up in NZ, the outdoors is pretty much part of your DNA. It`s coded in there somewhere directly after Rugby.
Wildlife photography; Land of Giants by Will Burrard-Lucas

Wildlife photography; Land of Giants by Will Burrard-Lucas

These photographs are part of a larger series documenting the elephants of Tsavo and the work of Tsavo Trust. The full series is published in a new book titled “Land of Giants”.
Three Chapters Of Illumination by Ann George

Three Chapters Of Illumination by Ann George

This series symbolizes a metaphorical journey towards liberated living.  The wolf within the work represents allegorically fear and the temptation to be driven by it allowing its control over our lives.
Self-Portraits by Jen Davis

Self-Portraits by Jen Davis

In this body of work, I deal with the insecurities associated with my body image and the direct correlation between self-perception and the way one is perceived by others.
Bill Gekas ; Fine art portrait photographer

Bill Gekas ; Fine art portrait photographer

Bill Gekas is a multi awarded and published photographer that was born and resides in Melbourne Australia.
Everybody Counts by Erlend Mikael Saeverud

Everybody Counts by Erlend Mikael Saeverud

Erlend wanted to ask him for a portrait, but he didn't dare. This became the inspiration for this project.

Trending Stories

Room 322 by Francesco Ridolfi

Room 322 by Francesco Ridolfi

I quickly realized that nowadays, taking a bath, is one of the rare situations completely for yourself, where you can take time and space, thinking, reflecting and maybe let emerge emotions deepen buried in your heart.
Shanghai by Tomofumi Nakano

Shanghai by Tomofumi Nakano

This works shows how do they see China from Japanese people. Envy, jealousy, disdain , nostalgy and more. A Japanese visual artist Tomofumi Nakano visualized Japanese complex emotions to the neighbor country China in this photographic works.
Benjamin Goss, The collector  of souls

Benjamin Goss, The collector of souls

My inspiration for the images im creating now comes from symbols and archetypes in mythology, history, religion, and our sub-concience.
Timeless city İstanbul & faces by Mustafa Dedeoğlu

Timeless city İstanbul & faces by Mustafa Dedeoğlu

The city that has been carrying the wisdom of hundreds of years, timeless city of Istanbul…The project is result of 8 years work and intends to reflect the atmosphere of the unique story of Istanbul
Between the photographer and the world; You Are Not Alone by Ivaylo Yorgov

Between the photographer and the world; You Are Not Alone by Ivaylo Yorgov

You Are Not Alone project was selected and published in our print edition 19. Ivaylo Yorgov is an amateur photographer, an alumnus and a member of the BECA Before Creating Academy, the first private photography academy in Bulgaria.
Kazakh eagle hunters & Golden eagle festival by Sanghamitra Sarkar

Kazakh eagle hunters & Golden eagle festival by Sanghamitra Sarkar

The Mongolian eagle hunters are a dying breed. In one estimate there are only fifty or sixty to two hundred and fifty eagle hunters left The golden eagle hunters capture the eaglets at around four months old
Portrait photography; The other side of venus by Anna Charlotte Schmid

Portrait photography; The other side of venus by Anna Charlotte Schmid

In the limbo of post-puberty the revelation is the highly sensitive form of vulnerability. Bodily-change and self-confidence go along the dangerous path of realization of one‘s identity
Purgatory by Daniele Martire

Purgatory by Daniele Martire

Purgatory is a personal reinterpretation of Dante’s work, an oneiric photographic/textual journey inside japanese modern society and its critical topics.
Afghanistan by Chiara Felmini

Afghanistan by Chiara Felmini

Entering Afghanistan catapults into another dimension: you enter a sphere where time and people do not belong to anything known.

Other Stories

stay in touch
Join our mailing list and we'll keep you up to date with all the latest stories, opportunities, calls and more.
We use Sendinblue as our marketing platform. By Clicking below to submit this form, you acknowledge that the information you provided will be transferred to Sendinblue for processing in accordance with their terms of use
We’d love to
Thank you for subscribing!
Submission
Dodho Magazine accepts submissions from emerging and professional photographers from around the world.
Their projects can be published among the best photographers and be viewed by the best professionals in the industry and thousands of photography enthusiasts. Dodho magazine reserves the right to accept or reject any submitted project. Due to the large number of presentations received daily and the need to treat them with the greatest respect and the time necessary for a correct interpretation our average response time is around 5/10 business days in the case of being accepted.
- Between 10/30 images of your best images, in case your project contains a greater number of images which are part of the same indivisible body of work will also be accepted. You must send the images in jpg format to 1200px and 72dpi and quality 9. (No borders or watermarks)
- A short biography along with your photograph. (It must be written in the third person)
- Title and full text of the project with a minimum length of 300 words. (Texts with lesser number of words will not be accepted)
This is the information you need to start preparing your project for its presentation
To send it, you must compress the folder in .ZIP format and use our Wetransfer channel specially dedicated to the reception of works. Links or projects in PDF format will not be accepted. All presentations are carefully reviewed based on their content and final quality of the project or portfolio. If your work is selected for publication in the online version, it will be communicated to you via email and subsequently it will be published.
Contact
How can we help? Got an idea or something you'd like share? Please use the adjacent form, or contact contact@dodho.com
Thank You. We will contact you as soon as possible.
Submission
Dodho Magazine accepts submissions from emerging and professional photographers from around the world.
Their projects can be published among the best photographers and be viewed by the best professionals in the industry and thousands of photography enthusiasts. Dodho magazine reserves the right to accept or reject any submitted project. Due to the large number of presentations received daily and the need to treat them with the greatest respect and the time necessary for a correct interpretation our average response time is around 5/10 business days in the case of being accepted. This is the information you need to start preparing your project for its presentation.
To send it, you must compress the folder in .ZIP format and use our Wetransfer channel specially dedicated to the reception of works. Links or projects in PDF format will not be accepted. All presentations are carefully reviewed based on their content and final quality of the project or portfolio. If your work is selected for publication in the online version, it will be communicated to you via email and subsequently it will be published.
Get in Touch
How can we help? Got an idea or something you'd like share? Please use the adjacent form, or contact hello@dodho.com
Thank You. We will contact you as soon as possible.