Interview with Riccardo Magherini; published in our print edition #19

Riccardo Magherini is a photographer and visual artist. By approaching his medium in innovative ways, Riccardo often challenges human perception, condition and context. 

Riccardo Magherini is a photographer and visual artist. By approaching his medium in innovative ways, Riccardo often challenges human perception, condition and context. 

Riccardo found his artistic voice during a journey in Japan. From that experience he developed a way to tell stories merging different times and spaces, taking pictures as fragments all around the subject, composing and tuning them as instruments in a score.  

Hong Kong, New York, Tokyo, Lisbon, Bangkok, Hanoi: his works, shot in the great metropolises of the world, sublime street life, recreating sensations through the time and space overlapping. Riccardo’s personal aesthetics continue to evolve alongside his continuously expanding artistic practice. 

His fine art photography is represented by galleries in Paris, in London and in New York. He has collected awards and recognitions from international contests such as the International Photography Awards, Prix de la Photographie Paris, International Aperture Awards, and the London International Creative Competition. [Official Website][Printed Edition][Digital Edition]

Photographing on the street is clearly a very important part of your practice. A you mention it makes you feel not at home… Being disconnected to the idea of a ‘home’, a place that makes you feel safe and easy is a feeling witch many individuals seem to avoid. We all seem to want to feel at home, yet this project seems to be more about the individuality of a nation and its people and not about how you fit into this environment. What I like about this project is that it is simply about exploration, the need to be curious and explore more. Tell us a little bit about how you came to the decision to photograph in the city of Hanoi and some of the experiences you may have had while photographing?  

For me street photography and photography in general, is actually the necessity to observe and be amazed by the things I meet through the journey. So it’s a natural thing, it’s spontaneous, to explore, to wander, to watch.

Hanoi belongs to a part of my imagination, just like all the Asia, that includes a strong fascination with the ‘other than me’. It was a matter of curiosity and fascination.  I mean, Vietnam. We all have the green mountain rice paddies image in our imagination, a shrine in the background and peaceful sunset on the horizon. At least I have. But I was interested in chaos.  Hanoi is a layered big urban agglomerate. You can see the layers of centuries, everywhere, even in people.

I wanted to walk through that, confront it, feel the diffidence of the elders and smile at the smiles of the youngers. Live the alleys, the decadence of the french concession, the heat of the wet market, smell the scent of the food cooked in the street, the noise of the traffic, meet the people that live and work on the sidewalks. As you said, be not at ‘home’.  And feel good.

I would like to discuss something which I believe is a fundamental part of this project and what I feel separates this from other street photos. That is the use of multiple images. I really like the idea that I can spend a lot of time looking at one photo, picking out new details as I go along. What made you come to this stylistic decision in the first place? And would you say this this body of work is a kind of controlled chaos, your attempt of making sense at the multitude and grandness of each corner of the city?   

Spending time looking at it. In it. It’s exactly that.

It’s the ambition to place in one image a world of things and moments, harvesting moments scattered all around, putting the time in still pictures. To gather all that fragments and lay them on the ‘surface’ and beneath it, putting them together following just the way you’ve seen it. To play with the hollows and the pauses, giving rhythm and dynamic balance, choosing the paths to tell the story. This is the push for me, and it was in the first place in 2011, during a stay in Tokyo. Since then I’m chasing this vision.

The colours and tones have also been very specifically curated. What I find most interesting about this is how you have approached colour grading differently. This cinematographic feel allows the viewer to dive deeper into these portraits. I was curious to know if all the images you used for each piece were taken during the same day or around the same area?    

Yes, mostly they had. It’s right the exact way I like to ‘paint’ the story or the portrait I’ve seen in the street. The pictures taken all around the subject keep coherent the peculiar palette.

‘Hanoi’ series colour grading comes from the ‘terre’ palette, which is natural in Hanoi, and it’s actually everywhere. It’s a patina, in the pictorial meaning, that wraps everything, that lays over things and even thoughts, giving you that smooth gradient tone.This kind of immersion in tones and colours gives you the mood into which you dip the brushes, so to speak.

In my opinion one of the most interesting images in this collection has to be the photograph of the older gentleman with the green dragon in the background. I find this interesting because of two main reasons. The first is the composition, I feel that is photograph has been composed very well and gives me a painterly kind of feeling. The second reason is of course the man’s expression. Could you describe this images for us, how you came about shooting this portrait, who the gentleman might be or if you had any prior interactions with him? 

That was a brief and intense encounter, I didn’t know who he was and I still don’t. It was a matter of a few moments, as for the whole portraits of the series.

I was outside a wet market with all the sorts of poultry and living fish, crabs, snakes and all the vegetables you can imagine (wet markets are the most incredible places).  He was there to keep an eye on the stocks. The location was incredible and he liked the idea to be portrayed, he wanted to.

The absence of communication ways, except the body language ones, forces you to interact with just looks and take permission to take a picture is all about little gestures. The dragon, a shrine porcelain decoration just on the other side of the alley, it’s him. For me it’s him. I mean, the defiant look, the posture, the rings and the nails. A dragon. Finding and then composing the connections between the things that surround a scene is magical and it’s incredibly amazing. It gives you the freedom to tell the story of the character you’ve imagined laying beneath a look or a gesture.

You mentioned when describing this collection of images, the intimacy, proudness and connection to nature the people of Hanoi expressed throughout their daily lives. I find this an interesting observation of the people within a city as is others such as New York and London, there might lack this need for nature and willingness to appreciate the earth and land they live on. One big aspect of Vietnamese life is food, did you find that much of this connection and love of nature was due to the respect that the Vietnamese people have for cooking. And were you also able to converse with locals about your observations?  

Vietnamese are connected with nature in all aspects of their life, even in the spiritual ones. Food and cooking are part of that connection and a strong popular tradition, deeply felt, but to find and appreciate those details as an outsider is a quite rare thing.  At first glance, some of them reserve to you the same diffuse standard they give to all strangers. You have to go deeper and have the luck to find someone that guides you.

During a stroll into a wet market, I met a young Vietnamese chef buying there the elements of his art. We talked about food and cooking throughout the morning, passing from one market to another, buying meat, fish, rice and coffee, teaching me how to choose and what to buy to make a ‘pho bo’ in the proper way. It was like a little culinary tour. That morning I learned that to cook Vietnamese you must be Vietnamese.

In certain parts of Hanoi, food comes every morning from the surrounding countryside carried by hundreds of women with their bicycles, wearing their typical hats.

They crowd the streets all around the markets carrying in large bamboo canisters vegetables, flowers, live chicken or raw food ready to be cooked on a little portable coal cooker there, on the street.

It’s capillary, it’s everywhere and it’s local.

Maybe is the street that gives you this kind of vision. Life at the ground level could be strictly related to matter and nature. These aspects are even stronger in the villages surrounding Hanoi, where people live and work often in direct relation with the soil.

My final question is about a previous project of yours titled: ‘Electric sheep’. I absolutely love this project as it really showcases an underbelly and grittiness of a city. The photographs are presented in such a way that to my personally, they look dystopian in nature. Will you be focusing more on night photography in the future and what kind of projects are you currently working on as well? 

Electric Sheep was strictly related to dystopian suggestions, so much to be dedicated to Philip K. Dick, even in titles. It was one of a kind experience but would be intriguing to find a night and dark situation to be explored. My fine art is strictly related to travel, so it had a stop in the past two years. When we will able to travel lightly again, China will be the next incredibly ambitious and wide artistic target.

Francesco Scalici

A recent MA graduate from the University of Lincoln, Francesco has now focused on landscape photography as the basis of his photographic platform. An author for DODHO magazine, Francesco’s interest in documentary photography has turned to writing and has had various articles, interviews and book reviews published on platforms such as: ‘All About Photo.com’, ‘Float Magazine’ and ‘Life Framer Magazine’. Currently on a photographic internship, Francesco has most recently been involved in the making of a short film titled: ‘No One Else’, directed by Pedro Sanchez Román and produced my Martin Nuza.

More Stories

Savoring Photography by Michael Bomberger

Savoring Photography by Michael Bomberger

A discussion over dinner a few weeks ago with a noted local artist about the nature of beauty and how humans perceive it took me back to my university lectures with Paul Weiss, a noted professor of metaphysics.
Spatial Relations by Shannon Randol

Spatial Relations by Shannon Randol

How the singular subject, viewer in the case of photography, is located in relation to other objects is referred to as spatial relation. Often happening subconsciously, ways in which objects respond to each other impacts the use(s) of a particular space.
A Himalayan Journey By Abhijit Bose

A Himalayan Journey By Abhijit Bose

The beauty of The Himalayan Region is its color and mood. I explored almost every season and made trips towards Terrain Region. It was a treat to my senses when I used to watch changes in color of a region just fifteen minutes away from another place getting washed in torrential rain. I realized nature as the biggest chameleon.

Nude Photography Awards

We invite you to participate in the first edition
of the Nude Photography Awards. We are looking
for the best nude picture for this year, 2022.

Our call is open to any artistic interpretation of nude photography.

DEADLINE | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2022

PHOTO BY © OLIVIER VALSECCHI
Underwater by Mike Potts

Underwater by Mike Potts

Underwater project was selected and published in our print edition 22. I see the water as a metaphor for a dream medium and I try to meet my subjects on that boundary and hope that we are able to take the viewer from tranquil peace to a burst of creation and back again.
A Space Odyssey-style evolution by Sonia Payes

A Space Odyssey-style evolution by Sonia Payes

A Space Odyssey-style evolution, is Alchemy (2021), a collection of 14 vibrant chromogenic prints. Each one reiterates the same basic composition and design, with Ilana’s avatar recurring indomitably across two orderly rows. 
Turin; You Do Not See by Riccardo Surace

Turin; You Do Not See by Riccardo Surace

The project titled What You Do Not See, Unordinary tells the story of the City of Turin, my city, seen through the eyes of passersby. All photographs have been captured with a long exposure technique; in other words, I mixed then history of the city with my own history, my life experience. In fact, after five years spent fighting a disease, my artistic purpose is primarily that of representing the all too familiar feeling when, as a young man wandering through the city, one feels invisible, and yet still he is thoroughly involved in its daily frenzy.

Featured Stories

Patterns, lines, textures; Urban Moods by Alex Axon

Patterns, lines, textures; Urban Moods by Alex Axon

Urban Moods is a photo project that tells the story of the city dynamism through bicycles and umbrellas captured in constant movement and surrounded by patterns, lines, textures.
Lifepod by Gianluca Micheletti

Lifepod by Gianluca Micheletti

My project consists of inserting some primates - they share with humans up to almost 99% of DNA - in safety capsules that will regenerate a form of primordial life, in a future day, after the extinction of the human breed.
Photo manipulation by Sulaiman Almawash

Photo manipulation by Sulaiman Almawash

Photo manipulation is a mix of photography and graphic design. Combining lot of elements and create an unique image. It requires lot of creative skills, is a great source for inspiration and its always great fun and joy when you work on particular concept.
Zodiac by Antonio Peinado

Zodiac by Antonio Peinado

Zodiac is a series of works, which were inspired by the myths and gods of the ancient Sumerian civilization which, thanks to the ancient Greeks, are known today as the Zodiac.
Timo Heiny ; My Africa

Timo Heiny ; My Africa

He felt immediately in love with this "paradise which respired greatness and freedom", as Tanja Blixen described in her poetic souvenirs in "Out of Africa".
The corsair project by Samuka Marinho

The corsair project by Samuka Marinho

This is a personal project developed by photographer Samuka Marinho as an original portfolio presentation. It is composed of over 400 images and has taken around a year and a half to be completed.
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/10/nude-banner.jpg

We invite you to participate in the first edition of the Nude Photography Awards. Our call is open to any artistic interpretation of nude photography.

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/BAnImage.jpg

ImageRights provides intelligent image search and copyright enforcement services to photo agencies and professional photographers worldwide.

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/mono2022.jpg

The best 100 images along with the winning images published in the yearly book “Monochromatic – Best Photographers of 2022”

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/10/banner23.jpg

Call For Entries #23 | After 22 editions and more than 100 published photographers, our print edition has proven to be a simply effective promotional channel.

A Mad World by Momoko Fritz

A Mad World by Momoko Fritz

About a year and a half ago I created a dinner series called, At Home with Momoko, where I would host 8-10 women once a month.
Japanese Aquariums by George Nobechi

Japanese Aquariums by George Nobechi

Japanese Aquariums is a journey into some of my oldest, most treasured childhood memories. Whenever I visited my grandparents in the small, northern Japanese city of Otaru, my grandfather, a high school teacher and an enormous influence in my life, would take me to the aquarium.
The Sideshow by Francisco Diaz and Deb Young

The Sideshow by Francisco Diaz and Deb Young

The Sideshow is the unique new series from The International Collaboration Project duo Deb Young of New Zealand and Francisco Diaz of the United States. Diaz and Young designed their new series to usher the viewer into a fictitious seaside carnival.
The fashion photography of Sean Archer

The fashion photography of Sean Archer

Fashion Photography ; Sean Archer is an agent from the movie Face Off. I took the nickname when I was not sure if I'm any good in this. My real name is Stanislav Puchkovsky, I am from Yekaterinburg, Russia.
Nostalgia by Mauricio Candela

Nostalgia by Mauricio Candela

A reflection on how fast the world moves today because of technology. And as a result, how younger generations have walked away from the simplest and most basic things in life.
Keyhole by Erwin Olaf

Keyhole by Erwin Olaf

This is what you see when peering through the keyhole of Erwin Olaf´s installation. A girl in a red coat sitting on the floor. A woman, with her back towards the camera.

Trending Stories

Blue Dot by Sergei Stroitelev

Blue Dot by Sergei Stroitelev

According to statistics, about 20% of the population in Russia have an anxiety-depressive disorder, and the same percentage of the population - all the prerequisites for its development. The reasons are stress, changes in society, problems of Internet dependency and other factors.
Portraits & Nudes by Mark Marin

Portraits & Nudes by Mark Marin

Mark is a multi-disciplinary designer and photographer. He has worked extensively in Interior Design for most of his career - commencing 1985. He first set up his own practice in Sydney in 1990 and since has successfully completed a large variety of projects across several disciplines and locations
India; Swan Song of the Badlas  by Taha Ahmad

India; Swan Song of the Badlas by Taha Ahmad

Mukaish Badla is a form of embroidery, which at its peak flourished in the Indian city of Lucknow. At its peak, in the 18th century, the art form travelled to different parts of the world, but is now restricted to a few narrow lanes of the old city of Lucknow.
In The Land Of The Northern Lights

In The Land Of The Northern Lights

It is a video of the Northern Lights created using stills (stop motion). All sequences are shot in or close to Tromsø in Northern Norway.
Interview with Julia Fullerton Batten

Interview with Julia Fullerton Batten

My photographic style encompasses cinematic lighting, powerful colour combinations, careful choice of models and the use of settings and props which enhance the visual story I am telling.
Favelas: the rhythm of change by Albertina d’Urso

Favelas: the rhythm of change by Albertina d’Urso

The favelas of Rio de Janeiro are mostly known for violence and drug trafficking. But, also if those problems still exist, life for most of the inhabitants has nothing to do with that. Favelas are becoming safer and better organized.
Portraits; Dosoliated Tbilisi by Claudio Rasano

Portraits; Dosoliated Tbilisi by Claudio Rasano

I started to search for faces and eyes who express Desolated life, and I usually photograph people outside life . For example inside a bath house, where I made some portraits of the workers in front of their changing room in a static pose.
Darjeeling – Mysterious Monsoons by Souradeep Roy

Darjeeling – Mysterious Monsoons by Souradeep Roy

Darjeeling is a small hilly town in the Indian state of West Bengal. At an elevation of 6700 feet its location in the lesser Himalayas makes it an attractive tourist destination during the summers.
Beach or life by Soumyabrata Roy

Beach or life by Soumyabrata Roy

Yellow rope knot is at the other end of the sea side wall. This is a type of fishing method, after putting the net in the sea fisherman hold rope (yellow) and run almost 1 km. When a freak vagabond woman stuck in front of a Yellow rope and the sea may want to talk to her.

Other Stories

stay in touch
Join our mailing list and we'll keep you up to date with all the latest stories, opportunities, calls and more.
We use Sendinblue as our marketing platform. By Clicking below to submit this form, you acknowledge that the information you provided will be transferred to Sendinblue for processing in accordance with their terms of use
We’d love to
Thank you for subscribing!
Submission
Dodho Magazine accepts submissions from emerging and professional photographers from around the world.
Their projects can be published among the best photographers and be viewed by the best professionals in the industry and thousands of photography enthusiasts. Dodho magazine reserves the right to accept or reject any submitted project. Due to the large number of presentations received daily and the need to treat them with the greatest respect and the time necessary for a correct interpretation our average response time is around 5/10 business days in the case of being accepted.
- Between 10/30 images of your best images, in case your project contains a greater number of images which are part of the same indivisible body of work will also be accepted. You must send the images in jpg format to 1200px and 72dpi and quality 9. (No borders or watermarks)
- A short biography along with your photograph. (It must be written in the third person)
- Title and full text of the project with a minimum length of 300 words. (Texts with lesser number of words will not be accepted)
This is the information you need to start preparing your project for its presentation
To send it, you must compress the folder in .ZIP format and use our Wetransfer channel specially dedicated to the reception of works. Links or projects in PDF format will not be accepted. All presentations are carefully reviewed based on their content and final quality of the project or portfolio. If your work is selected for publication in the online version, it will be communicated to you via email and subsequently it will be published.
Contact
How can we help? Got an idea or something you'd like share? Please use the adjacent form, or contact contact@dodho.com
Thank You. We will contact you as soon as possible.
Submission
Dodho Magazine accepts submissions from emerging and professional photographers from around the world.
Their projects can be published among the best photographers and be viewed by the best professionals in the industry and thousands of photography enthusiasts. Dodho magazine reserves the right to accept or reject any submitted project. Due to the large number of presentations received daily and the need to treat them with the greatest respect and the time necessary for a correct interpretation our average response time is around 5/10 business days in the case of being accepted. This is the information you need to start preparing your project for its presentation.
To send it, you must compress the folder in .ZIP format and use our Wetransfer channel specially dedicated to the reception of works. Links or projects in PDF format will not be accepted. All presentations are carefully reviewed based on their content and final quality of the project or portfolio. If your work is selected for publication in the online version, it will be communicated to you via email and subsequently it will be published.
Get in Touch
How can we help? Got an idea or something you'd like share? Please use the adjacent form, or contact contact@dodho.com
Thank You. We will contact you as soon as possible.