Interview with Riccardo Magherini; published in our print edition #19

Riccardo Magherini is a photographer and visual artist. By approaching his medium in innovative ways, Riccardo often challenges human perception, condition and context. 

Riccardo Magherini is a photographer and visual artist. By approaching his medium in innovative ways, Riccardo often challenges human perception, condition and context. 

Riccardo found his artistic voice during a journey in Japan. From that experience he developed a way to tell stories merging different times and spaces, taking pictures as fragments all around the subject, composing and tuning them as instruments in a score.  

Hong Kong, New York, Tokyo, Lisbon, Bangkok, Hanoi: his works, shot in the great metropolises of the world, sublime street life, recreating sensations through the time and space overlapping. Riccardo’s personal aesthetics continue to evolve alongside his continuously expanding artistic practice. 

His fine art photography is represented by galleries in Paris, in London and in New York. He has collected awards and recognitions from international contests such as the International Photography Awards, Prix de la Photographie Paris, International Aperture Awards, and the London International Creative Competition. [Official Website][Printed Edition][Digital Edition]

Photographing on the street is clearly a very important part of your practice. A you mention it makes you feel not at home… Being disconnected to the idea of a ‘home’, a place that makes you feel safe and easy is a feeling witch many individuals seem to avoid. We all seem to want to feel at home, yet this project seems to be more about the individuality of a nation and its people and not about how you fit into this environment. What I like about this project is that it is simply about exploration, the need to be curious and explore more. Tell us a little bit about how you came to the decision to photograph in the city of Hanoi and some of the experiences you may have had while photographing?  

For me street photography and photography in general, is actually the necessity to observe and be amazed by the things I meet through the journey. So it’s a natural thing, it’s spontaneous, to explore, to wander, to watch.

Hanoi belongs to a part of my imagination, just like all the Asia, that includes a strong fascination with the ‘other than me’. It was a matter of curiosity and fascination.  I mean, Vietnam. We all have the green mountain rice paddies image in our imagination, a shrine in the background and peaceful sunset on the horizon. At least I have. But I was interested in chaos.  Hanoi is a layered big urban agglomerate. You can see the layers of centuries, everywhere, even in people.

I wanted to walk through that, confront it, feel the diffidence of the elders and smile at the smiles of the youngers. Live the alleys, the decadence of the french concession, the heat of the wet market, smell the scent of the food cooked in the street, the noise of the traffic, meet the people that live and work on the sidewalks. As you said, be not at ‘home’.  And feel good.

I would like to discuss something which I believe is a fundamental part of this project and what I feel separates this from other street photos. That is the use of multiple images. I really like the idea that I can spend a lot of time looking at one photo, picking out new details as I go along. What made you come to this stylistic decision in the first place? And would you say this this body of work is a kind of controlled chaos, your attempt of making sense at the multitude and grandness of each corner of the city?   

Spending time looking at it. In it. It’s exactly that.

It’s the ambition to place in one image a world of things and moments, harvesting moments scattered all around, putting the time in still pictures. To gather all that fragments and lay them on the ‘surface’ and beneath it, putting them together following just the way you’ve seen it. To play with the hollows and the pauses, giving rhythm and dynamic balance, choosing the paths to tell the story. This is the push for me, and it was in the first place in 2011, during a stay in Tokyo. Since then I’m chasing this vision.

The colours and tones have also been very specifically curated. What I find most interesting about this is how you have approached colour grading differently. This cinematographic feel allows the viewer to dive deeper into these portraits. I was curious to know if all the images you used for each piece were taken during the same day or around the same area?    

Yes, mostly they had. It’s right the exact way I like to ‘paint’ the story or the portrait I’ve seen in the street. The pictures taken all around the subject keep coherent the peculiar palette.

‘Hanoi’ series colour grading comes from the ‘terre’ palette, which is natural in Hanoi, and it’s actually everywhere. It’s a patina, in the pictorial meaning, that wraps everything, that lays over things and even thoughts, giving you that smooth gradient tone.This kind of immersion in tones and colours gives you the mood into which you dip the brushes, so to speak.

In my opinion one of the most interesting images in this collection has to be the photograph of the older gentleman with the green dragon in the background. I find this interesting because of two main reasons. The first is the composition, I feel that is photograph has been composed very well and gives me a painterly kind of feeling. The second reason is of course the man’s expression. Could you describe this images for us, how you came about shooting this portrait, who the gentleman might be or if you had any prior interactions with him? 

That was a brief and intense encounter, I didn’t know who he was and I still don’t. It was a matter of a few moments, as for the whole portraits of the series.

I was outside a wet market with all the sorts of poultry and living fish, crabs, snakes and all the vegetables you can imagine (wet markets are the most incredible places).  He was there to keep an eye on the stocks. The location was incredible and he liked the idea to be portrayed, he wanted to.

The absence of communication ways, except the body language ones, forces you to interact with just looks and take permission to take a picture is all about little gestures. The dragon, a shrine porcelain decoration just on the other side of the alley, it’s him. For me it’s him. I mean, the defiant look, the posture, the rings and the nails. A dragon. Finding and then composing the connections between the things that surround a scene is magical and it’s incredibly amazing. It gives you the freedom to tell the story of the character you’ve imagined laying beneath a look or a gesture.

You mentioned when describing this collection of images, the intimacy, proudness and connection to nature the people of Hanoi expressed throughout their daily lives. I find this an interesting observation of the people within a city as is others such as New York and London, there might lack this need for nature and willingness to appreciate the earth and land they live on. One big aspect of Vietnamese life is food, did you find that much of this connection and love of nature was due to the respect that the Vietnamese people have for cooking. And were you also able to converse with locals about your observations?  

Vietnamese are connected with nature in all aspects of their life, even in the spiritual ones. Food and cooking are part of that connection and a strong popular tradition, deeply felt, but to find and appreciate those details as an outsider is a quite rare thing.  At first glance, some of them reserve to you the same diffuse standard they give to all strangers. You have to go deeper and have the luck to find someone that guides you.

During a stroll into a wet market, I met a young Vietnamese chef buying there the elements of his art. We talked about food and cooking throughout the morning, passing from one market to another, buying meat, fish, rice and coffee, teaching me how to choose and what to buy to make a ‘pho bo’ in the proper way. It was like a little culinary tour. That morning I learned that to cook Vietnamese you must be Vietnamese.

In certain parts of Hanoi, food comes every morning from the surrounding countryside carried by hundreds of women with their bicycles, wearing their typical hats.

They crowd the streets all around the markets carrying in large bamboo canisters vegetables, flowers, live chicken or raw food ready to be cooked on a little portable coal cooker there, on the street.

It’s capillary, it’s everywhere and it’s local.

Maybe is the street that gives you this kind of vision. Life at the ground level could be strictly related to matter and nature. These aspects are even stronger in the villages surrounding Hanoi, where people live and work often in direct relation with the soil.

My final question is about a previous project of yours titled: ‘Electric sheep’. I absolutely love this project as it really showcases an underbelly and grittiness of a city. The photographs are presented in such a way that to my personally, they look dystopian in nature. Will you be focusing more on night photography in the future and what kind of projects are you currently working on as well? 

Electric Sheep was strictly related to dystopian suggestions, so much to be dedicated to Philip K. Dick, even in titles. It was one of a kind experience but would be intriguing to find a night and dark situation to be explored. My fine art is strictly related to travel, so it had a stop in the past two years. When we will able to travel lightly again, China will be the next incredibly ambitious and wide artistic target.

Francesco Scalici

A recent MA graduate from the University of Lincoln, Francesco has now focused on landscape photography as the basis of his photographic platform. An author for DODHO magazine, Francesco’s interest in documentary photography has turned to writing and has had various articles, interviews and book reviews published on platforms such as: ‘All About Photo.com’, ‘Float Magazine’ and ‘Life Framer Magazine’. Currently on a photographic internship, Francesco has most recently been involved in the making of a short film titled: ‘No One Else’, directed by Pedro Sanchez Román and produced my Martin Nuza.

More Stories

Nude Photography; The Rituals of Life by Michael Bomberger

Nude Photography; The Rituals of Life by Michael Bomberger

As a photographer, there is something especially satisfying about the moment you start to edit images from a shoot - and this is especially true if the shoot included American model Stephanie Lauren.
Vimercati Hats by Jeroen Nieuwhuis

Vimercati Hats by Jeroen Nieuwhuis

After World War II, the whole industry changed. The city of Monza has a rich history of producing this wearable art by hand, but unfortunately, they are the only ones left. The modernization that happened in the '50s led to a decrease in production and by the 70s most of the factories shut down.
Met-esthisis; The dream is over by Ari Bafalouka

Met-esthisis; The dream is over by Ari Bafalouka

Met-esthisis (Μεταίσθηση) in greek means aftersensation. An image (usually a negative image) that persists after stimulation has ceased / a mental image of something previously experienced / an afterimage of a taste / of an experience.

Monochromatic Awards

We invite you to participate in the first edition
of the monochromatic awards. We are looking
for the best monochrome picture for this year, 2022.

The contest is open to any interpretation of monochromatic photography,
black and white, grayscale, sepia or any type of tone.

DEADLINE | THURSDAY, JUNE 30, 2022

PHOTO BY © SVETLIN YOSIFOV
Dancers; Lifting Up by Jacqueline Zilberberg

Dancers; Lifting Up by Jacqueline Zilberberg

The photographs of dance improvisations, accompanied by the dancers’ own words, trace the resuscitation of the dancers and their practice when, in the absence of colleagues and audiences, they reinvented their relation to their bodies and to the discipline of dance.
Tithe Muse by Nicoletta Cerasomma

Tithe Muse by Nicoletta Cerasomma

Teresa Bandettini was one of the most talented eclectic woman of the XIX century. She was well known as the intellectual dancer due to her captivating and touching extemporization performances.
My Americana by Joseph Patronite

My Americana by Joseph Patronite

“My Americana” is a long-term photography essay. Its goal: to create a contemporary view of the people, places or happenings which depict The United States of America.

Featured Stories

Francisco Arteaga, Street photographer

Francisco Arteaga, Street photographer

Streets are the places where all kind of souls surrounds us. Strangers become part of you once you’ve clicked, they let you know them, get into them and see what lies behind them. I look for body language, facial characteristics, particular expressions, trying to search the story that defines them.
Mike Ruiz, The photographer to the stars

Mike Ruiz, The photographer to the stars

Ruiz, who is of French Canadian and Filipino-Spanish ancestry,was born in Montreal in 1964, but raised in Repentigny, Quebec, Canada.
Eroticism & art; Tantalus by Terence Bogue

Eroticism & art; Tantalus by Terence Bogue

Whatever the version, he has given us the English word Tantalise - the embodiment of promise, flirtation or eroticism - just out of reach?I am drawn to the way B&W Photography conveys these tantalising glimpses. Glimpses that take on their own life in ways that enable each individual the freedom of their own unique interpretation.
Haiti – The Ongoing Struggle by Giles Clarke

Haiti – The Ongoing Struggle by Giles Clarke

The last 230 years of Haiti's history, from the days of Napoleonic slavery and the ensuing 'black revolution', is a struggle etched deep into the soul of the Haitian people. In 1804, after years of colonial fighting and over 120,000 slave deaths
Curiouser and Curiouser by Vicky Martin

Curiouser and Curiouser by Vicky Martin

Curiouser and Curiouser is a conceptual series of photographs influenced by the story Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. I was inspired to create this series from personally identifying with the theme of not belonging that features prominently in Alice’s narrative.
Homeless people; On the street by Zoltán Molnár

Homeless people; On the street by Zoltán Molnár

In the EU, the number of homeless people has grown by seventy percent in one decade. Nowadays more than 700 thousand people have to face the fact daily that they have no roof above their heads.
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Mono-banner.jpg

We invite you to participate in the first edition of the Monochromatic Awards. We are eager to see photograhs with new focus points and innovative approaches

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/BAnImage.jpg

ImageRights provides intelligent image search and copyright enforcement services to photo agencies and professional photographers worldwide.

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/banner.jpg

The book where words and images meet to never leave each other, The book contains 20 evocative paintings; each of them is a double page. 56 printed pages | 235x165mm

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/banner22.jpg

Call For Entries #21 | After 20 editions and more than 100 published photographers, our print edition has proven to be a simply effective promotional channel.

Transylvanian shepherds by Kerekes Istvan

Transylvanian shepherds by Kerekes Istvan

The region of Transylvania is known for the scenery of its Carpathian landscape and its rich history. The Western world commonly associates Transylvania with vampires because of the influence of Bram Stoker's novel "Dracula" and the many films the tale inspired.
Northern Siberia; Like Last Year’s Snow by Oded Wagenstein

Northern Siberia; Like Last Year’s Snow by Oded Wagenstein

In the remote village of Yar-Sale in Northern Siberia live a group of elderly women. They were once part of a nomadic community of reindeer herders.
Zodiac by Antonio Peinado

Zodiac by Antonio Peinado

Zodiac is a series of works, which were inspired by the myths and gods of the ancient Sumerian civilization which, thanks to the ancient Greeks, are known today as the Zodiac.
Everyday life; Our summer stories by Kata Sedlak

Everyday life; Our summer stories by Kata Sedlak

The idea behind the photo series "Our summer stories" came to existence after my three-year break - the maternity leave.
MiRelLA by Fausto Podavini

MiRelLA by Fausto Podavini

MiRelLa is the story of a woman, a mother, a wife, a grandmother. Mirella is 71 years old, she spent 43 years of her life with the only person loved. 43 years of sharing, difficulties, laughs and beautiful moments
The scars of war; Friendship Village by Kip Harris

The scars of war; Friendship Village by Kip Harris

The scars of war are deep and long lasting. That is particularly true of the Vietnam War. An entire generation along with their families, children, friends, and society

Trending Stories

Uli Weber ; Fashion and Portraiture

Uli Weber ; Fashion and Portraiture

The photographer, Uli Weber, has built a global reputation on his mastery of two distinct fields: capturing the profound and the profane in a popular culture fixated with celebrity; and revealing the intimate truths of portraiture.
Nude Bodies; Trying to keep the essential by Andreas Theologitis

Nude Bodies; Trying to keep the essential by Andreas Theologitis

In his latest collection, Andreas Theologitis rises to a personal challenge: creating emotion, conveying deep personal feelings, while presenting us with just abstract bodies.
Interview with Juan Jose Reyes, executive director of Miami Street Photography Festival

Interview with Juan Jose Reyes, executive director of Miami Street Photography Festival

The goal of the Festival is to establish a global platform for learning through exhibitions, workshops, lectures and other events. This Festival is a collaborative effort to advance the work of photographers who pay attention to everyday life in order to capture the world around us.​
Hokkaido, the Silence of Winter by Olivier Robert

Hokkaido, the Silence of Winter by Olivier Robert

This series is part of my ongoing project about the winter in Japan.These photographs were shot in Hokkaido where I’ve spent 10 years photographing minimalist landscape sceneries.
Bangladesh; Puppet Show by Anik Rahman

Bangladesh; Puppet Show by Anik Rahman

After every five years, the time for general election comes in Bangladesh, bringing with it a fresh season of despair and uncertainty. For the last couple of months, the nation has been passing through sheer horror
The Girl With The Face Tattoo by Thomas H.P. Jerusalem

The Girl With The Face Tattoo by Thomas H.P. Jerusalem

Waking as if from a dream, she stumbled forwards. She turned around but it was too late, the door slammed shut behind her.
Female body : This is a woman’ s story by Andreas Theologitis

Female body : This is a woman’ s story by Andreas Theologitis

Andreas Theologitis is a master photographic sculptor of the female body. He keeps our interest by overwhelming us with a plethora of nude photographs full of surprises; this is the main theme of his latest collection.
Story from the South by Bayu Wira Handyan

Story from the South by Bayu Wira Handyan

Story from the South is my effort to record my born city, a small city located on the south coast of Java. Born, grew up, and spent my adolescence life there makes me know every corner of the city as I know my own body.
Homemade by Adele Schelling

Homemade by Adele Schelling

The initial drive for Homemade is the stubborn desire the artist has felt to grow roots in the U.S.A, having moved to NYC from Switzerland a little over a year ago. There are a variety of ways to ground oneself into a different culture

Other Stories

stay in touch
Join our mailing list and we'll keep you up to date with all the latest stories, opportunities, calls and more.
We use Sendinblue as our marketing platform. By Clicking below to submit this form, you acknowledge that the information you provided will be transferred to Sendinblue for processing in accordance with their terms of use
We’d love to
Thank you for subscribing!
Submission
Dodho Magazine accepts submissions from emerging and professional photographers from around the world.
Their projects can be published among the best photographers and be viewed by the best professionals in the industry and thousands of photography enthusiasts. Dodho magazine reserves the right to accept or reject any submitted project. Due to the large number of presentations received daily and the need to treat them with the greatest respect and the time necessary for a correct interpretation our average response time is around 5/10 business days in the case of being accepted.
- Between 10/30 images of your best images, in case your project contains a greater number of images which are part of the same indivisible body of work will also be accepted. You must send the images in jpg format to 1200px and 72dpi and quality 9. (No borders or watermarks)
- A short biography along with your photograph. (It must be written in the third person)
- Title and full text of the project with a minimum length of 300 words. (Texts with lesser number of words will not be accepted)
This is the information you need to start preparing your project for its presentation
To send it, you must compress the folder in .ZIP format and use our Wetransfer channel specially dedicated to the reception of works. Links or projects in PDF format will not be accepted. All presentations are carefully reviewed based on their content and final quality of the project or portfolio. If your work is selected for publication in the online version, it will be communicated to you via email and subsequently it will be published.
Contact
How can we help? Got an idea or something you'd like share? Please use the adjacent form, or contact contact@dodho.com
Thank You. We will contact you as soon as possible.
Submission
Dodho Magazine accepts submissions from emerging and professional photographers from around the world.
Their projects can be published among the best photographers and be viewed by the best professionals in the industry and thousands of photography enthusiasts. Dodho magazine reserves the right to accept or reject any submitted project. Due to the large number of presentations received daily and the need to treat them with the greatest respect and the time necessary for a correct interpretation our average response time is around 5/10 business days in the case of being accepted. This is the information you need to start preparing your project for its presentation.
To send it, you must compress the folder in .ZIP format and use our Wetransfer channel specially dedicated to the reception of works. Links or projects in PDF format will not be accepted. All presentations are carefully reviewed based on their content and final quality of the project or portfolio. If your work is selected for publication in the online version, it will be communicated to you via email and subsequently it will be published.
Get in Touch
How can we help? Got an idea or something you'd like share? Please use the adjacent form, or contact hello@dodho.com
Thank You. We will contact you as soon as possible.