Interview with Joxe Inazio Kuesta

I think Dodho Magazine is an essential reference point regarding photographic projects publication, with a high diffusion among the professionals of the sector, galleries, agencies, etc. ... I value the diversity of what is published and the freedom it breathes and transmits.

I am an amateur photographer with a passion for street and documentary photography. I studied economics and business and I work as a civil servant for the Goverment of the Basque Country.

Photography has not been my lifelong hobby. In fact, it all started off after some travel experiences. It was back september 2005 that I traveled to the north of India. My photographic gear that time was a compact camera, and when back home I took a look at my pictures I noticed that it was not what I saw: most of the pictures were blurred, and so on. In november that year I went to Syria and it happened all the same. The pictures did not look as what I recalled from those places. That was the main reason why I attended a photography course organized by a non-profit organization called “Sociedad Fotográfica de Gipuzkoa” in Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain). This is where, thanks to its members, I learned the basics of photography. 

After that, my knowledge grows by reading magazines and books —especially from authors of the Magnum agency—and seeing a lot of photos. [Print Version] [Digital Version][Official Website]

Can you tell us a little about yourself?

I am an amateur photographer who studied Economic and Business Sciences. I work in the Basque Government, and I like to travel to countries where I can see and feel people of different races, religions, and customs. Although photography has not been my lifelong hobby, today it is my primary interest when choosing a destination. I could say that I only take photos when I travel.

How did you get interested in photography?

I started taking it more seriously after seeing the results of some photos I took in 2005 in India and Syria. I remember the emotion I felt when I photographed those places, the joy I experienced when I approached people and captured the moment I was living. But I also remember the desperation to know my photos were not good; most of them were blurred. The following year I enrolled in a photography course conducted by the Gipuzkoa Photographic Society in Donostia-San Sebastián. There, I learned the basics, and the remaining knowledge I get it by reading some books and magazines and seeing many photos.

What did inspire you to take The Bangladesh streets project?

In December 2012 I went to Bangladesh without knowing anything about the country. There I went around the streets capturing everything that happened around me with my camera. I saw its inhabitants in their usual chores, in their struggle to get ahead in very harsh living conditions. I approached them with the intention of knowing a little more the reality of each one. And I was surprised by the humanity and kindness of the people: they always helped me and treated me with great respect. When the Black & White 2018 of Dodho Magazine, it occurred to me to capture all this and present it as a project.

© Joxe Inazio Kuesta

How would you define your general style photography?

I could say I am interested in transmitting my reality vision more intimately. And although some of my photographs are hard to see and sometimes even violent, in them, there is always a clear message that is captured as soon as you see them, and I think they are very direct. I am looking for complicity with the people portrayed because I want them to look at me, at the camera, and to know what I am doing. 

Could you please tell us anything about your technique and creating process?

It begins at the very moment when I throw myself into the street with my camera, without a preconceived idea and only aware of what I see around me. Experience tells me the steps to take, teaches me to look and wait. What most excites me is to capture the looks of the people. Sometimes I think that the only merit I have is being in the right place at the right time. Then, in the edition, I try to make that emotion appear in the best possible way.

In your opinion, what makes a black & white Photography

I have always heard that black and white photography represents the soul and that color dresses it, and perhaps it is true. I think it’s an exciting option in documentary photography, especially I find it very effective for somewhat dramatic situations. I find it very useful to show that mysterious part of the scene or the portraits, that part I find hard to understand and that can be my soul.

How much preparation do you put into taking a photography?

Since the photography type I do is documentary or street, it is normal to find situations that are somewhat unexpected or spontaneous. Hence, the shot settings I use are those I think will be useful for a wide range of situations. And basically, they are a preference to the opening with a suitable ISO, the automatic focus in the central point I direct to the primary object, and almost always the finger in the trigger. I do not use a tripod and flash very rarely. I also check that the optics are clean and have enough memory and battery. The approach to people to photograph is quite simple; it is almost a reflex action not requiring any preparation.

© Joxe Inazio Kuesta

What do you think makes a memorable project?

For me, a project must be personal, that both the subject and the photographer tell me something. There must be coherence between the photos and the text. The photographs must be well sequenced and with a clear message from start to end. And the text has to complement that sequence. Although for me the photos are more important within the project, I believe the text should not be neglected. You should not overuse generalized and unemotional information, but you must make the project yours to give it an added value.

How do you know you got the shot you wanted?

I usually know it when I manage to capture in the photograph the emotion I had at the time of capture. For me, the most critical part is in fieldwork, when I see people in their usual chores. Sometimes I find myself in emotionally difficult situations, and such is the passion that I feel that I move in all directions to find the frame that best reflects that reality. Or if it is a portrait, I wait and wait until the person transmits to me what I feel. At the time of editing come those past experiences with people from other cultures, with other languages, and many times have been a greeting and a smile. And when I feel all this in the finished photograph, I know I have it.

Can you tell us about your intent/vision when you go out shooting?

I admit that I feel happy when I go out on the street with my camera with the intention of capturing some magical moment. And almost all sites interest me because I think that in any street, store, building, etc … something interesting can happen. If the subject or the scene to be photographed tells me something, then time stops, and I think only of capturing that moment, of getting those looks. It is a kind of trance that I enter, and that forces me to continue photographing without thinking about anything else, and I remain that way until the magic vanishes. These situations are what I seek and with which I enjoy. If the scene does not tell me much, I take one or two photos as a testimony and move on.

Your idea of the perfect composition?

When I’m photographing, I do not consider the composition rules; I think I forgot them a long time ago because they distract me. For me, the composition is perfect when I get to read and see in the photo what I have seen and read in the people photographed, and I do not see any element that bothers me enough.

© Joxe Inazio Kuesta

What would iI find in your Camera Bag?

My photographic backpack is the most critical luggage for my trips. In it, I am taking a Nikon D5 body mounted with an AF-S lens Nikkor 70-200 mm f2,8 E FL ED with which I do 95% of the photos. Also, a wide-angle AF-S Nikkor 12-24 mm f2.8 G ED that I use practically in closed places or with very little space. A Nikon Speedlight SB-900 flash and two hard drives. A laptop that I use, mainly, to download memory cards, and a small notebook that I almost never use. Also, a vanity case with memory cards, spare batteries, charger, and a cleaning kit.

How important is an awesome website for your business and how has social media played a role in your photography?

All my photos can be seen on a website called 1x.com (1x.com/member/joxeinazio). It is a link in which the photos are valued and published by members of a renowned jury. For me, it is imperative because it contributes very positively in my vision of photography. And although I have the photos for sale, I do not consider it to be a proper business. I also upload some photos to Instagram (@joxeinaziokuesta)

On the other hand, and thanks to Dodho Magazine, I am trying to learn to show my works included in photographic projects. I think it is a potent tool to transmit what I feel through a set of photographs linked by a text. 

 

What plans do you have for the future? What projects would you like to accomplish?

I have in mind to carry out a project addressing my vision of the Rohingya refugees who are camping in the Bangladesh lands.

As for the projects I would like to carry out, I believe that if I had the necessary permits, I would like to enter and know territories punished by hatred, places where people are repudiated for being what they are, for their religion, etc. …  but where I’m sure I’ll go is where the wind takes me.

Finally, one last question. What do you think about Dodho Magazine?

I think Dodho Magazine is an essential reference point regarding photographic projects publication, with a high diffusion among the professionals of the sector, galleries, agencies, etc. … I value the diversity of what is published and the freedom it breathes and transmits. I have had the good fortune to meet it and to present and publish some projects, becoming a finalist in the second black and white photo contest 2018, a real honor. For me, it has been quite a discovery, and I have no choice but to thank all those who make it possible.

© Joxe Inazio Kuesta

More Stories

Interview with Ann Prochilo; published in our print edition #20

Interview with Ann Prochilo; published in our print edition #20

Ann Prochilo brings extraordinary dreams of mixed elements, and thoughtful reflections to her images, being in the intersection of different worlds but still connected to her roots. Her surprising works are the result of a striking and complex process of work and way of thinking while trying to have her feet on the ground with everyday questioning about which is her place in the universe.
Interview with Sara Camporesi; published in our print edition #20

Interview with Sara Camporesi; published in our print edition #20

A photographer passionate about art, for a long time she has combined this interest with the spontaneity of visual storytelling, conceived not only as a classic account of experiences but as a combination of personal and creative shots conveys the secret appeal of urban places and museums, revealed through images and words like a “photographer narrator”.
As I See It by Lori Pond

As I See It by Lori Pond

"As I See It” is a series that examines and reproduces the fact (according to neurological studies I've read) that our brains, as a survival mechanism, can only process a few things at a time.

Color Awards

We invite you to participate in the first edition
of the Color Awards. We are looking
for the best color picture for this year, 2022.

The competition is open to any interpretation of color photography
in all its dimensions, from everyday reality
to pure abstraction

DEADLINE | FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2022

PHOTO BY © DANIIL KONTOROVICH
Exclusive Interview with Demi Cauwenbergh

Exclusive Interview with Demi Cauwenbergh

We had the honor to interview exclusively with the photographer Demi Cauwenbergh, winner of the Rotterdam Photo Best Exhibition Award. A collection of self-portraits that she have made over the course of 5 years, and it is still ongoing. she started making self-portraits in 2017 as a way to be really personal.
Paddy drying processes in manual mode by Shaibal Nandi

Paddy drying processes in manual mode by Shaibal Nandi

The drying of paddy is the most important part of making rice from raw paddy. In rural India, poor people still follow the manual process of drying raw paddy before taking those dried paddy into husking mill for milling.
Indigenous communities; Jaguar by Camila Berrio

Indigenous communities; Jaguar by Camila Berrio

Getting into the jungle takes several days; understanding the rhythm of life of the indigenous communities that live there requires much more. During the months that I spent with them, I had the opportunity to contemplate how life is being woven by the skillful hands of indigenous women who, in each backpack and in each seam, express their sadness, joy, hope and frustration.

Featured Stories

Self Portraits by Isabella Bubola

Self Portraits by Isabella Bubola

For Isabella Bubola, a 25 year old applied arts graduate, true passion lies in fine art and portrait photography. She began shooting whatever was around her (including herself) when she was eleven and got her first digital camera without the back screen. Ever since, her camera has been a most faithful companion.
The Iberians by Candy Lopesino

The Iberians by Candy Lopesino

The Iberian Peninsula is a geographical concept formed by Spain and Portugal, two geographically united countries but separately by an invisible border. 
Off-Season Santas by Mary Beth Koeth

Off-Season Santas by Mary Beth Koeth

An ongoing portrait series of off-season Santas. Santa Roy is a retired police officer who, in 1984, was named one of the Top Ten Law Enforcement Officers in the State of Florida.
Growing in Darkness by Mário Macilau

Growing in Darkness by Mário Macilau

Mário Macilau is a photographer who works with “the ghosts of society” – socially isolated groups and subcultures – activating subjects and their stories though his psychologically sensitive yet loaded photographic lens.
The state of britain by David Barrett

The state of britain by David Barrett

The state of Britain project was intended to be a study of Americanisation within the UK, however ,The result of the Brexit referendum signaled to me that Britain was about to change more significantly , Britain was about to exchange its liberal European past for a survival of the fittest ”Wild West” culture . 
Pilot by Mano Svanidze

Pilot by Mano Svanidze

We live in a boom of scripted TV series where watching TV shows take the face of addiction. It has brought many changes in people's behavior and their response to others.
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/color-banner.jpg

We invite you to participate in the first edition of the Color Awards. We are eager to see photograhs with new focus points and innovative approaches

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/BAnImage.jpg

ImageRights provides intelligent image search and copyright enforcement services to photo agencies and professional photographers worldwide.

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/banner.jpg

The book where words and images meet to never leave each other, The book contains 20 evocative paintings; each of them is a double page. 56 printed pages | 235x165mm

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/banner22.jpg

Call For Entries #21 | After 20 editions and more than 100 published photographers, our print edition has proven to be a simply effective promotional channel.

White Nile by Ana María Robles

White Nile by Ana María Robles

In a hollowed trunk as a way of the canoe, we cross one of the White Nile branches.  Rushing river leaves, among its branches, fertile islands occupied by a community living in subsidiaries sharing everything, utensils, blankets, instruments and collaborating in the ancient daily chores. It is the "Mundari" territory, nomadic shepherds of the Nile.
Artistic nude; Water & Photography by Christophe Vermare

Artistic nude; Water & Photography by Christophe Vermare

Water & Photography. This exhibit is about having those two dear friends close to me. Water and time, roots of my genes. Water contributes to my fulfillment. Being pleasant, useful, essential, my senses delight in it.
Love for Uganda by Victoria Knobloch

Love for Uganda by Victoria Knobloch

Many times I already traveled to Uganda and have gained a lot of insight. But I travel there not only for photography, but also because of my humanitarian project Deseret Foundatione.
Animeyed by Flora Borsi

Animeyed by Flora Borsi

Flora Borsi is a young fine art photographer from Hungary. She uses exquisite photo manipulation to create surreal images that are thematically focused on identity, relationships, emotions and dreams.
Fake by Matilde Pernille

Fake by Matilde Pernille

The next ten years I photographed myself and my friends growing into adults. When I turned 16 I got my first DSLR and started taking more professional portraits too. This led the way to more abstract photography, but I never stopped documenting my life.
The Langtang Survivors by Jan Møller Hansen

The Langtang Survivors by Jan Møller Hansen

Hundred disappeared when entire villages and homes in Langtang were wiped out when landslides, avalanches and icefalls caused by the two earth quakes that hit Nepal on 25. April and 12. May 2015.

Trending Stories

Temps d’Arrêt by Etienne Buyse

Temps d’Arrêt by Etienne Buyse

For the observer, everything happens behind an opalescent glazed partition. It is like a window onto another world. The photographer captures a slice of life from which he is excluded.
Metamorphosis by Dasha Raiskaya

Metamorphosis by Dasha Raiskaya

There is no logic in this project, everything is shot at the level of sensations. It was a very interesting experience. I decided to set myself a very interesting task - every day for a month to take one photo on an emotional state.
Supermarket food by Anne Mason-Hoerter

Supermarket food by Anne Mason-Hoerter

This continuous project started a couple of years ago when I discovered an immense amount of discarded food which was too old to be sold at the local supermarket.
Out of Breath by Hakan Simsek

Out of Breath by Hakan Simsek

All my works are about the thematic of the Identity and they are more like fundamental researches than projects, because a project has at least an end-date and a defined scope. 
Urban vegetation by Anne-Claire Vimal du Monteil

Urban vegetation by Anne-Claire Vimal du Monteil

Plastic experimentation pictures of Anne-Claire Vimal du Monteil explore the transformation of reality, its reinvention. Feeling and emotion take precedence over the precise representation of the subject.
Mood of the Market by Christine Norton

Mood of the Market by Christine Norton

Trinidad and Tobago is known as an oil rich twin island state in the Caribbean with a diverse population. Today, composed of largely Indo- and Afro-Trinidadians, we have been rated among the happiest countries in the world. 
Pets photography; Wet Dog by Sophie Gamand

Pets photography; Wet Dog by Sophie Gamand

Sophie Gamand is a French photographer living and working in New York. Since 2011, with both a documentary and artistic approaches,
New York; Sole Harlem by Louise Amelie & Aljaž Fuis

New York; Sole Harlem by Louise Amelie & Aljaž Fuis

The one and only, unique and pure – just Harlem, and nothing else. The title introduces Harlem as a magical place of longing that only works and lives within, and cannot carry its characteristics to the outside world.
Upper East Side Story by Alain Schroeder

Upper East Side Story by Alain Schroeder

White glove-buildings, designer boutiques, Museum Mile and ladies who lunch are some of the images associated with Manhattan’s Upper East Side (UES).

Other Stories

stay in touch
Join our mailing list and we'll keep you up to date with all the latest stories, opportunities, calls and more.
We use Sendinblue as our marketing platform. By Clicking below to submit this form, you acknowledge that the information you provided will be transferred to Sendinblue for processing in accordance with their terms of use
We’d love to
Thank you for subscribing!
Submission
Dodho Magazine accepts submissions from emerging and professional photographers from around the world.
Their projects can be published among the best photographers and be viewed by the best professionals in the industry and thousands of photography enthusiasts. Dodho magazine reserves the right to accept or reject any submitted project. Due to the large number of presentations received daily and the need to treat them with the greatest respect and the time necessary for a correct interpretation our average response time is around 5/10 business days in the case of being accepted.
- Between 10/30 images of your best images, in case your project contains a greater number of images which are part of the same indivisible body of work will also be accepted. You must send the images in jpg format to 1200px and 72dpi and quality 9. (No borders or watermarks)
- A short biography along with your photograph. (It must be written in the third person)
- Title and full text of the project with a minimum length of 300 words. (Texts with lesser number of words will not be accepted)
This is the information you need to start preparing your project for its presentation
To send it, you must compress the folder in .ZIP format and use our Wetransfer channel specially dedicated to the reception of works. Links or projects in PDF format will not be accepted. All presentations are carefully reviewed based on their content and final quality of the project or portfolio. If your work is selected for publication in the online version, it will be communicated to you via email and subsequently it will be published.
Contact
How can we help? Got an idea or something you'd like share? Please use the adjacent form, or contact contact@dodho.com
Thank You. We will contact you as soon as possible.
Submission
Dodho Magazine accepts submissions from emerging and professional photographers from around the world.
Their projects can be published among the best photographers and be viewed by the best professionals in the industry and thousands of photography enthusiasts. Dodho magazine reserves the right to accept or reject any submitted project. Due to the large number of presentations received daily and the need to treat them with the greatest respect and the time necessary for a correct interpretation our average response time is around 5/10 business days in the case of being accepted. This is the information you need to start preparing your project for its presentation.
To send it, you must compress the folder in .ZIP format and use our Wetransfer channel specially dedicated to the reception of works. Links or projects in PDF format will not be accepted. All presentations are carefully reviewed based on their content and final quality of the project or portfolio. If your work is selected for publication in the online version, it will be communicated to you via email and subsequently it will be published.
Get in Touch
How can we help? Got an idea or something you'd like share? Please use the adjacent form, or contact hello@dodho.com
Thank You. We will contact you as soon as possible.