Allanngorpoq by Sebastien Tixier

Greenland is, undeniably, suffering the effects of climate change. And over the last few decades, its society has undergone profound evolution. Thus, as the environment shifts, its people begin to embrace Western lifestyles and modes of consumption in parallel.
The towns in the north are cut off by the ice during winter. Containers are stored in the harbor and used for transporting merchandise in cargo ships. They are also used to deliver provisions to certain towns before they are cut off by the frozen sea in winter. Then boats are held prisoners, but life continues on the sea ice thanks to traditional sleds and, nowadays, snowmobiles.

Greenland is, undeniably, suffering the effects of climate change. And over the last few decades, its society has undergone profound evolution.

Thus, as the environment shifts, its people begin to embrace Western lifestyles and modes of consumption in parallel. Supermarkets, churches, cell phones or Facebook are slowly making their way into Inuit culture.

For the teenagers in the major towns the memories of seal hunting trips are long gone. And when they still occur in the northernmost dwellings, the traditional outfits made from animal hides mix with modern fabrics, and boats are used in combination with sledges. Tradition and technology are blending together, and the extent to which lifestyles differ on this territory is considerable.

The towns in the north are cut off by the ice during winter. Containers are stored in the harbor and used for transporting merchandise in cargo ships. They are also used to deliver provisions to certain towns before they are cut off by the frozen sea in winter. Then boats are held prisoners, but life continues on the sea ice thanks to traditional sleds and, nowadays, snowmobiles.
The towns in the north are cut off by the ice during winter. Containers are stored in the harbor and used for transporting merchandise in cargo ships. They are also used to deliver provisions to certain towns before they are cut off by the frozen sea in winter. Then boats are held prisoners, but life continues on the sea ice thanks to traditional sleds and, nowadays, snowmobiles.

At the frontier between sea ice and open water, about forty kilometers from the closest settlement in the northermost area of Greenland, a hunter watches for seals from his sled. Meanwhile, the other hunters are gone hunting from the boat.
At the frontier between sea ice and open water, about forty kilometers from the closest settlement in the northermost area of Greenland, a hunter watches for seals from his sled. Meanwhile, the other hunters are gone hunting from the boat.

Sébastien Tixier has always been fascinated by those who choose to live in hostile environments, especially in the remote lands of the North, as some of his childhood memories involve stories of Inuit men and women living on the ice, hunting seals using age-old techniques. The preparation process lasted for a period of a year and a half, during which the photographer immersed himself in the country’s history and current affairs, spotted locations, made contacts for his stays, and grappled with the charming grammar of the Inuit language, Kalaallisut. When he then traveled to Greenland at the beginning of 2013 he stayed with the local inhabitants of both some expanding “western” towns and the northernmost dwellings he encountered. From modern houses to nights in a tent pitched on the ice after hunting seals.

The results of this project are photographs which combines both a meticulous approach and an unremittingly instinctive feel. Despite the thorough preparation, the photograph admits he had felt like a foreigner when confronted with the originality of the environment, and with the challenges induced by the harsh conditions in which a simple breath freezes instantly on a viewfinder. This appears to come across in the wider framing of certain images, as if he felt compelled to take a few steps back in the snow to include ever-more context. Yet at other times, on the contrary, he gets closer to his subjects to provide more details and clues.

His journey brought him from the 67th to the 77th parallel north until Qaanaaq, with the aim of recording these changes on film, and confront today’s reality with childhood tales’ clichés: it’s not just about the pure white landscapes, the socio-economic questions currently rocking the nation are of everyone’s interest. These radical and rapid changes raise questions about society and identity, and divide public opinion in Greenland. Its people are torn between a desire to catch up with the modern world, and a feeling that they are an ice population which, like the ice itself, is slowly melting away.

SebastienTixier_03

Allanngorpoq” in Greenlandic can be translated as “being transformed

Medium-format analog photographs, 2013

About Sebastien Tixier

Born in 1980 in a small town in central France, Sebastien Tixier now lives and works in Paris. Trained as an engineer, but fascinated by his father’s camera during his childhood, he finally became a self-taught independent photographer in 2007. His work ranges from staged studio photographs to landscapes and documentaries on globalization and its impacts – culture, environment. His photographs have been awarded numerous prizes and been exhibited in festivals and galleries across Europe.

Allanngorpoq, his latest work to date, synthesizes a year and a half of preparation (documenting, making contacts, and learning the language) and immersion in Greenland. This artistic photo report captures the evolution of both a changing territory and its people. The book of this work was published in December 2014 and develops in 60 photographs. It is prefaced by Stéphane Victor, son of the famous arctic explorer and ethnologist Paul-Emile Victor. [Official Website]

With more than 4000 inhabitants, Ilulissat is the 3rd larger town in the country, and is located at the heart of the Disko bay on the west coast of Greenland. It is home to one of the largest icefjords in the world which features on UNESCO’s World Heritage List, and one of the most touristic place in the country. In the Inuit language Kalaallisut, “Ilulissat” means “icebergs”. The town provides its inhabitants with the same services as any regular Western town, and con- tinues to expand and grow, close to the luxurious Hotel Arctic on the hills above the harbor. Fishing is one of the main activities in Greenland, and its industry is the country’s second largest employer after the public sector. Ilulissat’s harbor is one the biggest platform for this activity. The production provides the supply for the shops in town, but is also widely exported. Fishing exports for Europe, USA and also Japan now come for almost 90% of all Greenland’s exports.
With more than 4000 inhabitants, Ilulissat is the 3rd larger town in the country, and is located at the heart of the Disko bay on the west coast of Greenland. It is home to one of the largest icefjords in the world which features on UNESCO’s World Heritage List, and one of the most touristic place in the country. In the Inuit language Kalaallisut, “Ilulissat” means “icebergs”.
The town provides its inhabitants with the same services as any regular Western town, and con- tinues to expand and grow, close to the luxurious Hotel Arctic on the hills above the harbor. Fishing is one of the main activities in Greenland, and its industry is the country’s second largest employer after the public sector. Ilulissat’s harbor is one the biggest platform for this activity. The production provides the supply for the shops in town, but is also widely exported. Fishing exports for Europe, USA and also Japan now come for almost 90% of all Greenland’s exports.

The largest cities have their own “housing proj- ects”, which were built in the 1960s by the Danish government to reduce supply costs by grouping the population. This also marks the beginning of a “rural exodus” and the progressive disappearance of smaller villages. For many Inuits, this lack of privacy symbolizes an affront to their civilization.
The largest cities have their own “housing proj- ects”, which were built in the 1960s by the Danish government to reduce supply costs by grouping the population. This also marks the beginning of a “rural exodus” and the progressive disappearance of smaller villages. For many Inuits, this lack of privacy symbolizes an affront to their civilization.

Transportations between towns are mostly done by plane or helicopter. There is no road network in Greenland, however cars and even taxis are now part of the urban landscape. But as a consumer society emerges, so too does the problem of waste management. Generally speaking, the edge of a town is usually designated as a dumping ground. Here is a car cemetery in Ilulissat.
Transportations between towns are mostly done by plane or helicopter. There is no road network in Greenland, however cars and even taxis are now part of the urban landscape. But as a consumer society emerges, so too does the problem of waste management. Generally speaking, the edge of a town is usually designated as a dumping ground. Here is a car cemetery in Ilulissat.

SebastienTixier_07 SebastienTixier_08

Icebergs stuck in the ice. The black spot at the foot of the nearest iceberg is some abandoned equip- ment tarpaulins, and gives an idea of the scale. Although the sea ice is still present in Uummannaq, its thickness is declining. In late March, it now mea- sures little more than twenty centimeters whereas, just a few decades ago, the average thickness was around forty centimeters. Cars do not venture on the ice if it less than thirty centimeters thick, so this is becoming an increasingly rare sight.
Icebergs stuck in the ice. The black spot at the foot of the nearest iceberg is some abandoned equip- ment tarpaulins, and gives an idea of the scale. Although the sea ice is still present in Uummannaq, its thickness is declining. In late March, it now mea- sures little more than twenty centimeters whereas, just a few decades ago, the average thickness was around forty centimeters. Cars do not venture on the ice if it less than thirty centimeters thick, so this is becoming an increasingly rare sight.

Qaanaaq’s wooden church on the outskirts of town in the midnight light of April. Qaanaaq which counts about 500 inhabitants is the northernmost town of the country (among the 3 most northern in the world), at the 77th parallel north. In mid-April the sun does not already completely disappear. At this period of the year, the temperature varies from -15°F to 15°F. While the Inuits historically embraced Shaman- ism, Danish colonialism introduced the Protestant monotheistic religion to Greenland.
Qaanaaq’s wooden church on the outskirts of town in the midnight light of April. Qaanaaq which counts about 500 inhabitants is the northernmost town of the country (among the 3 most northern in the world), at the 77th parallel north. In mid-April the sun does not already completely disappear. At this period of the year, the temperature varies from -15°F to 15°F.
While the Inuits historically embraced Shaman- ism, Danish colonialism introduced the Protestant monotheistic religion to Greenland.

Today, the Protestant faith is very present in Green- landic culture, and religious symbols, particularly Virgins or crucifixes, are displayed in every home. Cemeteries are usually located on the outskirts of town. Crosses sit atop the graves, and cold-resis- tant plastic flowers are used as decorations.
Today, the Protestant faith is very present in Green- landic culture, and religious symbols, particularly Virgins or crucifixes, are displayed in every home.
Cemeteries are usually located on the outskirts of town. Crosses sit atop the graves, and cold-resis- tant plastic flowers are used as decorations.

A few meters from a hunting camp on the sea ice, Frank’s outfit reflects current evolutions in cloth- ing: although “kamik” (traditional boots) and pants made from animal hides and furs are still used during sledges journeys and stays on the ice, more modern materials are also appearing. After the camp has woken up, it is time to fill the water bottles with drinking water. Hunters cut ice blocks from the icebergs stuck in the sea ice, and let them melt over a camping stove. The hunt will only starts at nightfall, and until them the jour- ney must continue further on the sea ice until the extremity is reached.
A few meters from a hunting camp on the sea ice, Frank’s outfit reflects current evolutions in cloth- ing: although “kamik” (traditional boots) and pants made from animal hides and furs are still used during sledges journeys and stays on the ice, more modern materials are also appearing.
After the camp has woken up, it is time to fill the water bottles with drinking water. Hunters cut ice blocks from the icebergs stuck in the sea ice, and let them melt over a camping stove. The hunt will only starts at nightfall, and until them the jour- ney must continue further on the sea ice until the extremity is reached.

SebastienTixier_13

In all “traditional” Greenlandic houses, like Knut’s one, the walls display memories collected through- out his life: family photographs, trinkets and signs of national identity coexist and intermingle. While running water is still lacking from many houses in the far north, modernity is nonetheless making its presence felt: telephones and even televisions are now part of everyday life. And while many houses in the north of the country also do not have access to a developed sewage system (wastewater flows from homes and freezes in the streets), toilets are, however, serviced by a spe- cialized municipal collection team. These new jobs reflect Greenland’s quest to secure its own financial independence as it embraces a more Western lifestyle.
In all “traditional” Greenlandic houses, like Knut’s one, the walls display memories collected through- out his life: family photographs, trinkets and signs of national identity coexist and intermingle.
While running water is still lacking from many houses in the far north, modernity is nonetheless making its presence felt: telephones and even televisions are now part of everyday life. And while many houses in the north of the country also do not have access to a developed sewage system (wastewater flows from homes and freezes in the streets), toilets are, however, serviced by a spe- cialized municipal collection team. These new jobs reflect Greenland’s quest to secure its own financial independence as it embraces a more Western lifestyle.

In 1953, the town of Qaanaaq and its inhabitants were relocated a hundred kilometers north to enable the U.S. Air Force to expand its military base in Thule. In “compensation”, the army built the first houses at the new location, which are now considered to be the historic houses of “new Thule”. With no running water, they are identifiable by their small surface areas, low ceilings and two sets of windows.
In 1953, the town of Qaanaaq and its inhabitants were relocated a hundred kilometers north to enable the U.S. Air Force to expand its military base in Thule. In “compensation”, the army built the first houses at the new location, which are now considered to be the historic houses of “new Thule”. With no running water, they are identifiable by their small surface areas, low ceilings and two sets of windows.

Qaanaaq is one of the only areas in Greenland where encounters with polar bears can occur. Hunting is possible yet regulated, and killed ani- mals have to be declared. Here lies the unwashed skull of a polar bear.
Qaanaaq is one of the only areas in Greenland where encounters with polar bears can occur. Hunting is possible yet regulated, and killed ani- mals have to be declared. Here lies the unwashed skull of a polar bear.

The hunting of sea mammals also occurs in the north of the country, and involves a journey across forty kilometers of sea ice to reach the open water. Even if the hunters in Qaanaaq are the last to still master the ancestral kayak hunting technics, more modern boats are also used to get closer to the mammals. The boat is pulled on a sled from town. The sleds are often grouped into “ropings” to optimize the dogs’ combined force, but many breaks are still required to give the animals the rest they need. After a seven-hour journey from Qaanaaq we meet another group of hunters already there. “Siku a jor- poq” says one of them : “the ice is bad”, we have to move and look for another place. Cell phones are used frequently, as is the case here, to keep abreast of the shifting weather – a telltale sign of the changing times. (Remark: here the hunter is having a call to Ikuo Oshima, a famous Japanese hunter who settled in Siorapalukin 1972)
The hunting of sea mammals also occurs in the north of the country, and involves a journey across forty kilometers of sea ice to reach the open water. Even if the hunters in Qaanaaq are the last to still master the ancestral kayak hunting technics, more modern boats are also used to get closer to the mammals. The boat is pulled on a sled from town. The sleds are often grouped into “ropings” to optimize the dogs’ combined force, but many breaks are still required to give the animals the rest they need.
After a seven-hour journey from Qaanaaq we meet another group of hunters already there. “Siku a jor- poq” says one of them : “the ice is bad”, we have to move and look for another place. Cell phones are used frequently, as is the case here, to keep abreast of the shifting weather – a telltale sign of the changing times. (Remark: here the hunter is having a call to Ikuo Oshima, a famous Japanese hunter who settled in Siorapalukin 1972)

At the edge of the sea ice at around 1 a.m., hunters cut up the seals brought back by the boat after the hunt. The pieces are later shared out between the hunters, and left on the ice to freeze overnight. All the meat from the hunted animals is eaten, and their skins used. The camp eventually fell asleep at around 3 a.m. amid the ceaseless howling of dogs and cracking ice.
At the edge of the sea ice at around 1 a.m., hunters cut up the seals brought back by the boat after the hunt. The pieces are later shared out between the hunters, and left on the ice to freeze overnight. All the meat from the hunted animals is eaten, and their skins used. The camp eventually fell asleep at around 3 a.m. amid the ceaseless howling of dogs and cracking ice.

SebastienTixier_19 SebastienTixier_20

Back from the journey after three days spent on the sea ice, the fog is back and slowly crawls over the frozen fjord. Dogs are attached at the edge of town. Their howling wakes the population up at 7 a.m. for another day. View from the edge of town, at the 77th north par- allel, facing South - where the rest of the world is.
Back from the journey after three days spent on the sea ice, the fog is back and slowly crawls over the frozen fjord. Dogs are attached at the edge of town. Their howling wakes the population up at 7 a.m. for another day.
View from the edge of town, at the 77th north par- allel, facing South – where the rest of the world is.

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