EuropeFeaturedStoryAcid Survivors by Jan Møller Hansen

Acid attacks in Bangladesh are usually the result of land disputes, rejected marriage proposals, refusal or inability to pay dowry, resistance of being trafficked as sex worker or simply the desire for revenge.

Acid attacks in Bangladesh are usually the result of land disputes, rejected marriage proposals, refusal or inability to pay dowry, resistance of being trafficked as sex worker or simply the desire for revenge.

The overwhelming majority of victims are young women and children, but men are also increasingly among the victims. Permanently disfigured and psychologically scarred, survivors are often shunned from their local communities, making it impossible for them to find work or get married. It is estimated that from 1999 and until 2013 app. 3000-4000 women, children and men in Bangladesh fell victim to acid attacks. Though the rate of acid violence is in decline, the number of attacks remains alarmingly high. Statistics are never fully reliable. The photographer was living in Dhaka from 2007 to 2012, and these photographs of acid survivors were made during 2011 and 2012. During that period new victims were admitted every week to the Acid Survivors’ Foundation (ASF) in Dhaka.

About Jan Møller Hansen

Jan Møller Hansen (b. 1964) is a self-taught and international award-winning photographer, who works with visual story telling and social documentary. He has attended a few trainings by VII Photo Agency, Magnum Photos, British Journal of Photography, Grundtvig High School in Denmark and is presently enrolled in a documentary photography course organised by World Press Photo, Noor and DMJX.

Jan has photographed slum dwellers, indigenous and aborigine people, brick kiln workers, sexual minorities, sex workers, conflict affected people, refugees, acid survivors and other marginalised people while living in Nepal, Bangladesh and South Sudan. He works with international development and humanitarian assistance and is a former senior diplomat.[Official Website]

Shamsul praying to Allah.
Shamsul Hoque is 30 years old and from Thakurgaon in North-eastern Bangladesh. Shamsul had a shop where he repaired TVs and electronics. He was doing business together with a friend, who had a tailor shop next door. Business went okay for Shamsul, and he started lending a bit of money to his friend who was in trouble. After some time Shamsul realised that his friend was not willing to repay the loan. The shop that his friend occupied also belonged to Shamsul, and the friend did not want to pay for electricity and water either. Shamsul was not happy with the situation.
In the beginning, the two were best friends, but then Shamsuls friend got married and things started to change. The relation between Shamsul and his friend became more and more problematic. One night Shamsul was sleeping in his shop. It was dark, and suddenly his friend came into the room during night and threw a bucket of acid over him. The acid came all over Shamsuls body and went deep into his eyes. The incidence happened one night in April 2007. Shamsul cannot remember which date it was.
Shamsul was rushed to the hospital in Dineshpur – the Medical College. His condition was very severe, and the hospital was not able to treat him properly and to keep him alive. More that 60 per cent of his body had been seared by the strong acid.
Some people from the non-governmental organisation BRAC had heard about the case, and they came to the hospital and got Shamsul transported to the City Hospital in Dhaka city. Shamsul was kept alive at the City Hospital, and after some time he was transferred to the Acid Survivors Foundation in Dhaka. Here they were able to save his life and get him through the critical time.
Shamsuls friend, who threw acid at him, had in the meantime gone to India. But after some time his friend came back to Thakurgaon so that he could continue with his business. After one week of the incidence, a police case was filed against Shamsuls friend, but police did not want to take the case further. The police told Shamsul and his family that it was too late to file such a case. So after some time they gave up. Long time ago, BRAC had also filed a case against his friend. Apparently it had gone to the High Court, but Shamsul was not quite sure. Shamsul did not think that anything would happen. Now it was five years ago, and his friend was still living with his family and doing business in Thakurgaon – so why should anything happen to him now? There were hundred thousands of unsolved court cases in Bangladesh so he was convinced that nothing would ever happen to his friend. He was just praying to Allah.

Selina is 17 years old and from Matipur in Noakhali district in Southern Bangladesh. Selina testified in a case where a group of young men had attacked her younger sister, Farhana, with acid. Farhana was 15 years old when the attack happened. A group of young men harassed her on her way to and from school. On 15th June 2010, they attacked her with acid. The other week it was her elder sister Selina’s turn. The acid attackers wanted revenge against Selina, and one week ago broke into her house during the early hours and throw acid at her. She was punished by Selina was admitted to the Noakhali Medical College Hospital after an acid attack and later to the Acid Survivors’ Foundation Hospital in Dhaka as her condition deteriorated. Selina and Farhana’s family has filed a case against six known criminals, who are from the local area. Selina had testified against them before the district court recently, and all the accused obtained bail. After they were released they attacked Selina. The father of Selina and Farhana died last year. Their mother, Mazeda, was saying to a local newspaper: “There is no justice in this country. My younger daughter did not get justice and now the elder one has become a victim of the same crime. What is the use of our survival? I along with all my daughters will commit suicide by taking poison”. The local police arrested some of the criminals.

In 2003, Shahnaz’s sister went abroad for work and was sending money home to her husband. Shahnaz then got married, and her husband’s younger brother wanted money from Shahnaz and her sister. Shahnaz’s father was a poor man and could not afford to pay dowry to Shahnaz’s family in-law. During marriage Shahnaz got two daughters. She could not get a son. Therefore her family in-law did not accept her. They did not like her, and wanted revenge, because the family had not got enough dowry from Shahnaz and her family. One night he went to Shahnaz’s house and walked into her bedroom. While she was asleep, he poured acid over her. The crime happened on 13th October 2003.

Meftahul was a chemistry student at Chittagong University in Bangladesh. When she was studying at the university there was a group of male fellow students, who harassed her for a long time. Meftahul complained officially to the university about the harassments. One of the male students, who continued to approach and harass Meftahul, was the son of a senior staff at the university. His father and others made life difficult for Meftahul and tried to cancel her admission to exams at the university.
As time went Meftahul became more and more stressed and desperate. After eight months she could not stand it any longer. On 4th July 2011, Meftahul was attending a practical session in the chemistry laboratory at the university. Here she took a bottle with acid and went out of the lab. She sat down on the stairs outside and drank the acid in an attempt to commit suicide. Meftahul did not die instantly and was immediately admitted to the Chittagong Medical College in a critical condition. She was nine days at the hospital in Chittagong and later transferred to the Intensive Care Unit at the Burn Unit at Dhaka Medical Hospital. Meftahul spend two months at the Intensive Care Unit struggling for her life before she came to the Acid Survivors’ Foundation in Dhaka

Rubel is a young man from Noakhali district in the Southern part of Bangladesh. Rubel was attacked by acid due to a family dispute over his father’s land.

Rubel is a college student from Noakhali district in the Southern part of Bangladesh. Rubel and his brother got a small piece of land from their father. One of their uncles and his sons wanted Rubel and his brother to sell the land to them so that they could make money. Rubel and his brother did not agree, and one day they attacked Rubel with acid.

Sabber and his father after the acid attack.

Sonia is 24 years old. She is from Faridpur, which is situated Northwest of the capital Dhaka in Bangladesh. When Sonia was 13 years old and went to class 7, one of her cousins wanted to marry her. He was at that time a student in class 10 and 18 years old. Sonia did not want to marry her cousin, and she refused his love attempts. For a while Sonia did what she could to resist and keep him at distance. One night, the cousin came to her house and threw acid on her while she was asleep. Sonia do not want to talk about what happened. She has two sisters and a brother, and her father died some years ago. Her brother is unemployed and is doing nothing. Sonia now looks after her mother, and also supports her two sisters and brother.
Sonia is herself working with acid victims and is proud, because she has recently been promoted to a better job. Today is she is filling-in paper for a mother and her three years old son, who some days ago was also attacked with acid by an uncle. Sonia earns 9000 taka, equivalent to 150 dollars, per month and spends half of her salary for her family. After work she is trying to study and finish her bachelor in arts at a private university in Dhaka.
Sonia’s surname is Bristi, which means rain. She hopes that rain will heal her scars. Sonia filed a case with the police, and the cousin who committed the crime was sentenced to 32 years in jail.

After the acid attack, Shahnaz filed a case with the police against her husband’s younger brother. After eight years nothing had happened. Her husband’s younger brother now lives in Narajangunj south of Dhaka. Shahnaz’s husband does no longer want to see her, and she lives with her mother and her two daughters. Her two daughters are 14 and 10 years old and go to class 9 and 6, respectively. Shahnaz says that it is her two daughters that keep her alive.

His name is Durjoy. In his native language, Bangla, “Durjoy” means invincible. 

Durjoy had strong sulfurique acid poured down his mouth and throat as a baby at the age of six weeks by his paternal aunt. His tongue, teeth, mouth and throat melted instantly. Burnt skin hung loose on his neck. It was a matter of heritance. As the only male heir to a poor Hindu family, his aunt saw Durjoy as a threat to her inheritance, and so she tried to kill him. 

The incidence happened in 2005, and Durjoy was admitted to the Dhaka Medical College Hospital. He was alive but starving to death. His anterior neck had been destroyed and the mouth merged into the sternum in a mass of dense scar. He was found by the Acid Survivors Foundation in Dhaka, and came in contact with the British doctor, Ron Hiles, who for many years had been doing fantastic heroic work for acid survivors in Bangladesh. The first operation was performed in Bangladesh involved removing the dense anterior neck scar and closing the defect with skin grafts. Enteral feeding was needed to improve Durjoy’s nutritional status. During 2006, he was operated several times in Bangladesh, and he was putting on weight and beginning to walk but his future remained perilous. 

Charity funds were raised, and Durjoy and his parents travelled to Hong Kong at the end of 2006, where Durjoy again underwent a series of operations. The Bangladeshi doctor Kawser Ahmed accompanied the family and was also involved in the lifesaving operations in Hong Kong. When Durjoy arrived in Hong Kong he had difficulty in breathing with risk of aspiration necessitating a tracheostomy, inability to take liquid or solid food requiring permanent enteral feeding and inability to talk or vocalise due to intraoral scarring and tethering of his tongue. 

Durjoy returned to Bangladesh in March of 2007 and on the day of his discharge, he was active, interacting, putting on weight and doing well and learning to play a bit with a football. Durjoy was very well looked after in Dhaka, but inevitably as he grew his caloric needs outweighed the possible input through his small oral aperture. In addition his speech was non-existent due to the tethering of his tongue. On 1 November 2009, Durjoy returned to Hong Kong. His mother, father and a physiotherapist from Dhaka, Sultana, accompanied him. Durjoy underwent further scar revisions in the neck, insertion of a ‘permanent’ gastrostomy tube and further intraoral grafts. Durjoy left Hong Kong in January 2010 with the feeding tube in place. 

Durjoy is now living in Dhaka where skilled and courageous people look well after him. Durjoy is truly invincible. He is a miracle of the human spirit.

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/BAnImage.jpg

ImageRights provides intelligent image search and copyright enforcement services to photo agencies and professional photographers worldwide.

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/view.jpg
Share your most best images in this photo contest in collaboration with ViewBug. A community that hosts over 40 photo contests and challenges.
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Z.jpg

Simply Stunning Landscapes – Would you like to capture stunning landscapes every time you shoot… without having to travel far from home?

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/BB-Gallery-2.jpg
Share your most best images in this photo contest in collaboration with ViewBug. A community that hosts over 40 photo contests and challenges.
RELATED STORIES
I, me and my city Balarka Brahma

AsiaB&WCityStoryI, me and my city Balarka Brahma

The city of joy is not my birthplace. I came here as a migrant from a small town to search for a better future, better education and a better life. From then to now the city has changed drastically. And so it has within my mind and soul.
Street photography; Bari Tales by Luca Laghetti

B&WCityEuropeStreet photography; Bari Tales by Luca Laghetti

“Bari Tales” is a street photography diary in Bari. it tries to tell the city in a different light showing with no filter the raw realism of Bari streets.
Nádia Maria ; Poetic Photography

AmericaConceptNádia Maria ; Poetic Photography

Born in 1984 (by fate, being born on World Photography Day), Nádia Maria is a Brazilian photographer based in Bauru, São Paulo, Over the years she explored photography, and has studied at Senac school in Brazil.
The color of my blues by Clémence Elman

ConceptEuropeThe color of my blues by Clémence Elman

This series is an exploration of the female body. Inspired by the freedom which emerges from her model, Clémence Elman chooses to represent the female outlines in a poetic way, but also without artifice.
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/insta.jpg
Google Street View; Lost highway by by Florian Ruiz

ConceptGoogle Street View; Lost highway by by Florian Ruiz

The access of the deserted roads across the 20km exclusion zone around the Fukushima’s nuclear plant is forbidden. Here, inspiring myself from the ready-made artwork, I sought to test the bounds of photography by using Google Street View images taken after the accident as an artistic material.
Interview with Gavin Smart; published in our print edition #15

DnaEuropeInterview with Gavin Smart; published in our print edition #15

Gavin Smart is an award-winning freelance photographer. He has a rich and diverse creative background which began with his rigorous musical training, studying the tuba at London’s prestigious Guildhall School of Music.
TRENDING STORIES
Interview with Mike Berenson

AmericaDnaInterview with Mike Berenson

This is what motivates me to not just go out and shoot landscapes, but to go out and capture the wonders of Colorado (and beyond) in a way that screams beauty and leaves a genuine lasting impression.
Haiti – The Ongoing Struggle by Giles Clarke

B&WFeaturedStoryHaiti – The Ongoing Struggle by Giles Clarke

The last 230 years of Haiti's history, from the days of Napoleonic slavery and the ensuing 'black revolution', is a struggle etched deep into the soul of the Haitian people. In 1804, after years of colonial fighting and over 120,000 slave deaths
Promised Land by Michael Konrad

ConceptEuropePromised Land by Michael Konrad

Michael Konrad (birth name Michael Smuda) born 02.10.1983 year in Wodzislaw Slaski, Poland. Conteptual photographer, self-portraitist. He is married and has three daughters.
Irish Travellers by Jamie Johnson

AmericaB&WStoryIrish Travellers by Jamie Johnson

Growing Up Travelling The experience I had photographing the grit and beauty, that is the everyday life of a Irish Traveller child, is one that inspires me everyday.
People from Brooklyn; Presence by Daniel McInnis

AmericaShotPeople from Brooklyn; Presence by Daniel McInnis

Starting in late 2007, I began photographing denizens of New York City with an 8x10 view camera. This type of camera uses 8-inch by 10-inch photographic negatives from which either contact prints (same size as the negative itself) or enlargements are made.
Looking for – Viola Andrushchuk

EuropeStoryLooking for – Viola Andrushchuk

Militarization, propaganda of war, increase of military costs... This is the reality of recent Russia. But this way is acceptable not for all Russian citizens. This project has united participants of different social initiatives together, for whom anti-war appeal is a basis for their work. 
India in Search of Gender Equality by Francisco Alcalá

StoryIndia in Search of Gender Equality by Francisco Alcalá

According to Dr. Vasa Prabhakar (SAP College) in India, discrimination against women can start in the womb. Gender inequality, patriarchy, caste system, dowry system is an acute and persistent problem.
One-Sixth of a Second ; Street photography by Steve Geer

B&WCityEuropeOne-Sixth of a Second ; Street photography by Steve Geer

Street photography can be fascinating. I think it's because we are naturally nosy. We want to stare, to absorb the details and imagine the facts. In real time, on the street, we only get a glimpse of passing strangers.
Poetry of Speed by Jagdev Singh

AsiaB&WStoryPoetry of Speed by Jagdev Singh

Since times unknown, horses have played a very significant role in human civilizations across the world. Known for their enormous power, stamina, speed and benevolence with mankind, they have the term ‘horsepower’ signature to them.
FEATURED STORIES
Homeless people; On the street by Zoltán Molnár

B&WEuropeFeaturedStoryHomeless people; On the street by Zoltán Molnár

In the EU, the number of homeless people has grown by seventy percent in one decade. Nowadays more than 700 thousand people have to face the fact daily that they have no roof above their heads.
Religious devotion; Viernes Santo by Oliver Weber

B&WEuropeFeaturedStoryReligious devotion; Viernes Santo by Oliver Weber

Ceremony of the funeral of god’s son Jesus. With the arrival of spring comes Easter week. It has centuries of history behind it and is one of Spain’s most authentic and emotive celebrations.
Losing our minds by Eddy Verloes

B&WConceptEuropeFeaturedLosing our minds by Eddy Verloes

I want this poetic-philosophical reflection to speak through my images in these corona times. In my series “Losing our minds” I consciously show only young people who are looking for themselves, for the meaning of life and the relationship between man and nature.
Ethiopia; The art of disappearing by Harry Fisch

EuropeFeaturedShotEthiopia; The art of disappearing by Harry Fisch

The trucks continually roll past the roads that lead to their villages, spitting out so much dust that people living in the villages can no longer breathe. 
Wet-plate collodion process; My America by Rashod Taylor

AmericaB&WConceptFeaturedWet-plate collodion process; My America by Rashod Taylor

With this work I want the viewer to get a good look at what it is like living in America as a Black man. I use the wet-plate collodion process to connect the past to the present and explore the atrocities of slavery and Jim Crow
Documentary photography; Can’t Smile Without You by Martin Andersen

B&WEuropeFeaturedStoryDocumentary photography; Can’t Smile Without You by Martin Andersen

Photographer and life-long Tottenham Hotspur fan, Martin Andersen has turned his camera on his fellow fans to create ‘Can’t Smile Without You’, an intimate and often visceral collection of photographs taken at home, away, and across Europe from 2013 until 2017 with the last game played at the White Hart Lane stadium.
Anže Godec; Austro-Hungarian army complex abandoned by Yugoslav forces finds a new artistic life

EuropeFeaturedStoryAnže Godec; Austro-Hungarian army complex abandoned by Yugoslav forces finds a new artistic life

Army complex from the time of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. It lies by Metelkova Street in the center of Ljubljana, Slovenia. It was abandoned in the early 1990s, when Yugoslavia collapsed.
Women hold up half the sky by Gerard Exupery

AmericaB&WFeaturedStoryWomen hold up half the sky by Gerard Exupery

It’s another beautiful day in paradise. Dark, and rainy. It’s one of those days that suggest the beauty of film. F-stop wide open, the darkness and grain, the feeling of an impressionist painting.
Alternative family album by Frank Rodick

AmericaConceptFeaturedAlternative family album by Frank Rodick

These images are part of what I’ve called an “alternative family album.” With one exception, I constructed each work using vernacular photographs from archives discovered after my parents’ deaths.
OTHER STORIES
X
stay in touch
Join our mailing list and we'll keep you up to date with all the latest stories, opportunities, calls and more.
We use Sendinblue as our marketing platform. By Clicking below to submit this form, you acknowledge that the information you provided will be transferred to Sendinblue for processing in accordance with their terms of use
We’d love to
Thank you for subscribing!
Submission
Dodho Magazine accepts submissions from emerging and professional photographers from around the world.
Their projects can be published among the best photographers and be viewed by the best professionals in the industry and thousands of photography enthusiasts. Dodho magazine reserves the right to accept or reject any submitted project. Due to the large number of presentations received daily and the need to treat them with the greatest respect and the time necessary for a correct interpretation our average response time is around 5/10 business days in the case of being accepted.
- Between 10/30 images of your best images, in case your project contains a greater number of images which are part of the same indivisible body of work will also be accepted. You must send the images in jpg format to 1200px and 72dpi and quality 9. (No borders or watermarks)
- A short biography along with your photograph. (It must be written in the third person)
- Title and full text of the project with a minimum length of 300 words. (Texts with lesser number of words will not be accepted)
This is the information you need to start preparing your project for its presentation
To send it, you must compress the folder in .ZIP format and use our Wetransfer channel specially dedicated to the reception of works. Links or projects in PDF format will not be accepted. All presentations are carefully reviewed based on their content and final quality of the project or portfolio. If your work is selected for publication in the online version, it will be communicated to you via email and subsequently it will be published.
Issue #14 | September 2020
Current Issue
Vicky Martin
Ryotaro Horiuchi
Susanne Mildeelberg
Diego Bardone
Nicky Hamilton
Alain Schroeder
Printed on 80# matte paper 22x28cm | 100 Pages
Showroom
September 7 to October 31, 2020
Julia Fullerton-Batten
LOOKING OUT FROM WITHIN
Get in touch
How can we help? Got an idea or something you'd like share? Please use the adjacent form, or contact contact@dodho.com
Thank You. We will contact you as soon as possible.
Dodho Magazine is pleased to announce the new call for the photographers selection from all over the world that will be presented in an exceptional edition.
Deadline: Monday, November 30, 2020
Photo by ©Ryotaro Horiuchi | Japan | Issue#14
Dodho Magazine is pleased to announce the new call for the photographers selection from all over the world that will be presented in an exceptional edition.
Deadline: Monday, November 30, 2020
Photo by ©Ryotaro Horiuchi | Japan | Issue#14
CALL
FOR ENTRIES
Dodho Magazine is pleased to announce the new call for the photographers selection from all over the world that will be presented in an exceptional edition.
Are you ready?
Deadline: Monday, November 30, 2020
Contact
How can we help? Got an idea or something you'd like share? Please use the adjacent form, or contact contact@dodho.com
Thank You. We will contact you as soon as possible.
Submission
Dodho Magazine accepts submissions from emerging and professional photographers from around the world.
Their projects can be published among the best photographers and be viewed by the best professionals in the industry and thousands of photography enthusiasts. Dodho magazine reserves the right to accept or reject any submitted project. Due to the large number of presentations received daily and the need to treat them with the greatest respect and the time necessary for a correct interpretation our average response time is around 5/10 business days in the case of being accepted. This is the information you need to start preparing your project for its presentation.
To send it, you must compress the folder in .ZIP format and use our Wetransfer channel specially dedicated to the reception of works. Links or projects in PDF format will not be accepted. All presentations are carefully reviewed based on their content and final quality of the project or portfolio. If your work is selected for publication in the online version, it will be communicated to you via email and subsequently it will be published.
NEW!
FOLLOW US.
Subscribe now and get a free access to a curated list of resources.
Feel free to contact.
2017 (C) All rights reserved.
ghfd