Social documentary photography; Kennedy Hill by Ingetje Tadros

Kennedy Hill is a remote Aboriginal community in Broome in the north-west of Australia in the Kimberley. The community exists in the shadows of Western Australian premier Colin Barnett’s commitment to close down approximately 100-150 Aboriginal communities in Western Australia.

Kennedy Hill is a remote Aboriginal community in Broome in the north-west of Australia in the Kimberley. The community exists in the shadows of Western Australian premier Colin Barnett’s commitment to close down approximately 100-150 Aboriginal communities in Western Australia.

There are more than 270 remote Indigenous communities in Western Australia and between them they are home to 12,000 people. Australian award winning Photojournalist Ingetje Tadros has spent four years working with the Aboriginal people and documenting the confronting daily life within the Aboriginal community. Her concerns for the community stretch from the old uninformed line that demonises Aboriginal men by insinuating that Aboriginal women and children are under great threat by the men in the communities to a lack of affordable accommodation while over seven per cent of the Kimberley population is homeless, and ninety per cent of this homelessness is comprised by its First Peoples.

Aboriginal elders and leaders are shocked and feel this is a big threat to their people and believe the impact of such a move could be almost as devastating, forcing people out of the communities would just relocate and intensify underlying problems of poverty, disadvantage and unemployment. History is repeating itself!

Much of the Kimberley is now under a regime of liquor restrictions, and some believe the drying up of Central and Eastern Kimberley towns has driven many of the most hardened and troubled alcoholics to Broome, where the booze continues to flow. So the problem of alcohol in smaller communities and the restrictions has moved the problem to the larger centres. 

The hill is significant to indigenous people in the region and the presence of a large shell midden immediately adjacent to the community is testament to this significance. It’s been a living area since before white occupation or colonisation….since time immemorial.

Now the question remains, which Aboriginal communities will be closed?

Kennedy Hill sits in one of the most pristine real estate in the town of Broome. The Community is slowly being dismantled. What the future holds for it’s future residents is unknown.

“We need new houses !” Stuart Ah Choo commented while he was totally stressed out. The first phase of the demolition of Kennedy Hill began on 15 September 2014. It has the community divided and given a lot of stress to it’s residents. 7 houses out of the 12 remain.

“Danger, Demolition work in progress” This condemned house was for many homeless a home. After the house was demolished on September 22nd and a gate was placed, many of the homeless people made camp outside the gate and still remain there till this day.

Meah (5 yr) standing outside her family home, it’s 7.30 AM and watching the bulldozer demolishing Kennedy Hill’s Office. Now four houses and one Office have been demolished, seven houses remain. Recently the Premier of Western Australia, Colin Barnett, committed to closing down approximately 150 remote Aboriginal Communities in Western Australia. What will the future be for Kennedy Hill?

Kids playing at their family home in Kennedy Hill, despite poverty children are being children. Quane (1 yr), Meah (3 yr), Kitana (3 yr) and Marjorie (4 yr) (from L to R)

Chrissy turned 21 and the Seaside Drifters Band from One Mile Community (Broome) came over to Kennedy Hill for a gig and played in the old office of Kennedy Hill which has now been demolished.

Liam, Charlette, Quane, Marjorie and Megs relaxing while watching tv in Charlette’s room. Tourists fly in from all over the world to Broome to enjoy the Cable Beach resorts and the surrounding pristine environment but for the residents of Kennedy Hill this reality is totally removed from their world.

Amanda Lewis lays on the couch in Esther’s house in Kennedy Hill wondering what the day will bring. The word is that Kennedy Hill will slowly but surely be completely demolished. It is now seven dwellings left. When all the dwellings are gone, where will all the people moved on by the Mallingbar Aboriginal Corporation go? The land may either be sold or in some sort of joint venture developed.

Esther Yumbi having breakfast in her home in Kennedy Hill. Due to excessive alcohol consumption she has been diagnosed with diabetes and is now being treated with dialysis in Perth Hospital 2300 km away.
Many members of Aboriginal communities are traumatised by events from the past and for not being recognised. And for that, self-medication in the form of alcohol, cannabis, gambling, violence and amphetamines leads to health problems, unemployment, sexual and physical violence, foetal alcohol spectrum disorder, etc. until the circle breaks, as in people committing suicide, ending up in jail or just surviving till the end.

Bruce Njamme has been coming and going to Kennedy Hill for a few months, living it rough and always has been very kind to me and one morning he said to me, “Hey Ingi from now on we will call you ‘Nagala’ (sister) then Bruce said “I want to sing a song for you.” Then he walked over to an old and abounded car outside the fence in the sand dunes, sat on the bonnet and said, “I am from Balgo from the desert and I sing this song for my family who all passed away and for my father who is Sunfly. The song is called Worray Yagga Yagga.” It was a very emotional song and than he burst out in tears. Many of these people who live in and around Kennedy Hill are so far from their country.

Sussanne Charmawina is homeless and leaving her bushcamp in the sand dunes in Kennedy Hill to go to Haynes Oval in Broome’s Chinatown district. Many homeless sit in the day time at Haynes Oval which is a large park in the center of Broome. People are drifting in from remote communities around the Kimberley as Broome is exempt from the tight liquor restrictions in place in the rest of the Kimberley. Sussanne is on the waiting list for a house.

Alan Dededar leaving Kennedy Hill and mentioned to me he is on his way to Centacare. Centacare Kimberley in Broome provides a range of services to people who are homeless, at risk of becoming homeless, or are experiencing financial hardship. Centacare have an outreach team that engages with people sleeping rough throughout the Broome area with a primary focus on supporting them to access social housing. Centacare runs a homeless breakfast. Alan is from Balgo a dry community (alcohol is not permitted) and is squatting in a condemned house in Kennedy Hill. (This house has now been demolished).

About Ingetje Tadros

Ingetje Tadros occupies a unique place in the world of social documentary photography, capturing the triumphs, tragedy and diversity of people’s lives through her intuitive storytelling. With a passion deeply rooted in humanitarian causes, her photography is often confronting and provocative to evoke a powerful message, telling people’s stories firstly at a community level and then to provide a conduit for communication between different cultures on a global platform.

Born in Holland, in her formative years Ingetje was always documenting the life of people around her, ultimately combining her passion for photography and travel to where her work now takes her around the globe. Her creative vision has been the driver to authoring several documentary projects as diverse as Mental Health in Bali, Leprosy in India, Trans-sexuality in Asia and Death Rituals in Egypt. Ingetje’s recent documentation of Kennedy Hill and important work This Is My Country involved documenting the complexities of race and culture of Australia’s indigenous people – the Aboriginals. 

She has worked on assignments for some of the world’s best known online and print magazines. Her clients have included STERN, Amnesty International, Fairfax Media,  Sydney Morning Herald, Australian Geographic, The Australian, The Internationalist, News Corp, Getty Images, Daily Mail, DOC Magazine and many more. Recent publications include This is My Country in STERN (2016), Kennedy Hill (Fairfax Media 2015), Caged Humans in Bali (Daily Mail 2014). Ingetje’s work has been recognised by a number of photography’s most prestigious honours. [Official Website][Book:This is My Country]

More Stories

Terra Mater – Ode to My Family  by Marco Castelli

Terra Mater – Ode to My Family by Marco Castelli

Words are not inherently suitable to embrace any even blurred concept of time, and beside all speech being made nowadays around the sense of family, its true nature belongs to the undetectable trace we leave through centuries, and to our relationship with time itself.
The magical hidden world by Georgi Georgiev

The magical hidden world by Georgi Georgiev

The magical hidden world project was selected and published in our print edition 23. These photos are one of my personal best from the past few years. Most of them are from one place where I spend every spare moment to take photos.
Sleepless by Rebecca Sexton Larson

Sleepless by Rebecca Sexton Larson

Growing up I always had an affinity with the night. It was when I did my most productive work, alone in my bedroom free from noise and distractions. I would find comfort in the subdued light and quiet stillness, losing a sense of time and being absorbed in the moment of creating art.

Portrait Photography Awards

We invite you to participate in the first edition
of the Portrait Photography Awards. We are looking
for the best portrait for this year, 2023.

Our call is open to any artistic interpretation of portrait photography.

DEADLINE | FRIDAY, MARCH 31, 2023

PHOTO BY © JOSE GIRL
Pride and prejudice by Renata Dutrée

Pride and prejudice by Renata Dutrée

Pride and prejudice project was selected and published in our print edition 23. This ongoing series of studio portraits of young men is intended to challenge the viewer with social constructs that are centered around masculinity and femininity. Gender bias, gender roles and stereotypes can affect everyone negatively.
Gender identity; Lexi by Timothi Jane Graham

Gender identity; Lexi by Timothi Jane Graham

I first met Lexi at the beginning of her medical gender affirmation journey in December 2020. At 58 years old, she had identified and lived as a woman for decades behind closed doors. She was born and raised in Ecuador where the LGBTQ community faces intense discrimination which often ends in violence.
Metaversic world by Byoung Ho Rhee

Metaversic world by Byoung Ho Rhee

With the innovation of digital technologies such as artificial intelligence in the 21st century, the world of metaverse is being witnessed around our lives such as games and movies. The age of mixing virtual with reality. In the metaverse world, the cyberspace where virtual and reality are harmonized is called mixed reality MR.

Featured Stories

The Tribal Heartland of India by Tania Chatterjee

The Tribal Heartland of India by Tania Chatterjee

Bastar is the tribal heartland and treasure trove of ancient Indian culture. Today Bastar, is a part of the State of Chhattisgarh, India. It is a land of undiscovered surprises, with mysterious forests, breath-taking waterfalls
Vegetable Peddler by Yoshitaka Masuda

Vegetable Peddler by Yoshitaka Masuda

In Japan, baby boomers continue to grow older, and the population 75 years or older has grown to be 13.3% of the total population. 6.1% of these women and 2.7% of these men cannot go out shopping or ask a relative living elsewhere to assist them.
Ordinary days is beautiful  by Takako Fukaya

Ordinary days is beautiful by Takako Fukaya

Takako Fukaya has three daughters. They are so special to her. Also she thinks “Children” like them is a hope and a future in this world.
Chinese Opera by Tewfic El-Sawy

Chinese Opera by Tewfic El-Sawy

It is widely acknowledged that Chinese opera (Cantonese, Hokkien or Teochew) in Malaysia (and elsewhere) is on the wane due to the lack of interest from a younger generation.
Rodeo; Behind the chute by Leigh Ann Edmonds

Rodeo; Behind the chute by Leigh Ann Edmonds

Behind the chute project was selected and published in our print edition 18. The connection and reliance between humans and their livestock had me fully embracing the deep- rooted traditions of the rodeo and the people involved.
People of the Earth: San tribe by Aga Szydlik

People of the Earth: San tribe by Aga Szydlik

People of the Earth / Deeply rooted in their nomadic culture and in symbiotic relationship with the animals and plants, San are the original inhabitants of South Africa, aboriginal to sub-Saharan Africa.
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/01/bannerpr.jpg

We invite you to participate in the first edition of the Portrait Photography Awards. Our call is open to any artistic interpretation of portrait photography.

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/BAnImage.jpg

ImageRights provides intelligent image search and copyright enforcement services to photo agencies and professional photographers worldwide.

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/mono2022.jpg

The best 100 images along with the winning images published in the yearly book “Monochromatic – Best Photographers of 2022”

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/12/banner24.jpg

Call For Entries #24 | After 23 editions and more than 100 published photographers, our print edition has proven to be a simply effective promotional channel.

Iceland by Alvaro Tejero

Iceland by Alvaro Tejero

Iceland, a paradise for photographers and lovers of nature and landscape. A unique and wonderful country. For those of us who live in Europe it is fortunate to have such a relatively close territory.
Not in Kansas by Vicky Martin

Not in Kansas by Vicky Martin

Not In Kansas is a staged series of photographs inspired by the tenacious, self- reliant character Dorothy from the story The Wizard of Oz.
Vanishing Faces Tibet by Larry Louie

Vanishing Faces Tibet by Larry Louie

The current pace of development around the world has brought widespread concern about a loss of diversity in nature and the need to protect endangered species.  But the changes brought by the forces of globalization, industrialization and urbanization affect not only animals and plants.  People and cultures, ways of thinking and ways of living that have been in existence for thousands of years, are also at risk.  
Northern Siberia; Like Last Year’s Snow by Oded Wagenstein

Northern Siberia; Like Last Year’s Snow by Oded Wagenstein

In the remote village of Yar-Sale in Northern Siberia live a group of elderly women. They were once part of a nomadic community of reindeer herders.
Canary island; Captain Flint by Oliver Weber

Canary island; Captain Flint by Oliver Weber

Around me furnishings in the style of "Rustic German" dating from the 1970s. Hunting trophies, a skeleton, a treasure chest, swords and books. I am not alone. With me is Captain Flint.
Kibera by Marcel Kolacek

Kibera by Marcel Kolacek

Kibera. The largest slum in Africa. With absolute certainty can not say it, but it's pretty huge, especially population density. Various sources state different numbers

Trending Stories

The Moroccans by Leila Alaoui

The Moroccans by Leila Alaoui

The Moroccans is a photographic series of contemporary live size portraits, shot in a mobile photo studio across morocco.
Matador by Stuart Paton

Matador by Stuart Paton

'Matador' is my awkward air-kiss to Milan. An oblique portrait of the oblique city I'm struggling to call home. I'd love to say I skipped off the train, turned on a sixpence and effortlessly found the back of the net.
Tokyo; Suits of kabukicho by Rokas Jankus

Tokyo; Suits of kabukicho by Rokas Jankus

By dusk, the streets of this endless seeming city are being roamed by 'suits'. Its a known, yet overlooked phenomenon. Hungry for bowls of ramen, raw tuna, cold sake out of cans and women, they're being delivered by red taxis to amusement miles in Shinjuku,
Cryptic Venus by Nicoletta Cerasomma

Cryptic Venus by Nicoletta Cerasomma

The main characters and subjects of this project are women from Lucca, feminine figure that shaped their lives based on their will.
The Women of Prison no.5 by Simru Hazal Civan

The Women of Prison no.5 by Simru Hazal Civan

Halide Dündar was the manager of Revolutionist Democratic Women Association (DDKAD) when she was arrested and brought to Diyarbakır Prison No. 5. at year 1980. Her offense was teaching Kurdish women how to read and write.
Half the sky Serie by Floriane de Lassée

Half the sky Serie by Floriane de Lassée

In her photographic work, Floriane highlights women who carry the World. In a environment sometimes harsh, this serie put forward women who give a new dimension and humanity to space.
Sisters by Zuzu Valla

Sisters by Zuzu Valla

I became excited about bringing together sadness, mystery, tenderness and fragility all in women's body language. I also love to tell story trough the pictures.
Lucha Libre Extrema by Annick Donkers

Lucha Libre Extrema by Annick Donkers

Annick has been traveling widely in Mexico since 2002, and after many years of living between countries, finally decided to settle permanently in Mexico City.
High Walls by Souradeep Roy

High Walls by Souradeep Roy

Beaches are celebrated to be a neighbourhood for recreation, a place to let go of the day-to-day life and have a quiet time. It is, in most metropolitan cities, also known for its beachside properties and sea-facing villas for the affluent communities.

Other Stories

stay in touch
Join our mailing list and we'll keep you up to date with all the latest stories, opportunities, calls and more.
We use Sendinblue as our marketing platform. By Clicking below to submit this form, you acknowledge that the information you provided will be transferred to Sendinblue for processing in accordance with their terms of use
We’d love to
Thank you for subscribing!
Submission
Dodho Magazine accepts submissions from emerging and professional photographers from around the world.
Their projects can be published among the best photographers and be viewed by the best professionals in the industry and thousands of photography enthusiasts. Dodho magazine reserves the right to accept or reject any submitted project. Due to the large number of presentations received daily and the need to treat them with the greatest respect and the time necessary for a correct interpretation our average response time is around 5/10 business days in the case of being accepted.
- Between 10/30 images of your best images, in case your project contains a greater number of images which are part of the same indivisible body of work will also be accepted. You must send the images in jpg format to 1200px and 72dpi and quality 9. (No borders or watermarks)
- A short biography along with your photograph. (It must be written in the third person)
- Title and full text of the project with a minimum length of 300 words. (Texts with lesser number of words will not be accepted)
This is the information you need to start preparing your project for its presentation
To send it, you must compress the folder in .ZIP format and use our Wetransfer channel specially dedicated to the reception of works. Links or projects in PDF format will not be accepted. All presentations are carefully reviewed based on their content and final quality of the project or portfolio. If your work is selected for publication in the online version, it will be communicated to you via email and subsequently it will be published.
Contact
How can we help? Got an idea or something you'd like share? Please use the adjacent form, or contact contact@dodho.com
Thank You. We will contact you as soon as possible.
Submission
Dodho Magazine accepts submissions from emerging and professional photographers from around the world.
Their projects can be published among the best photographers and be viewed by the best professionals in the industry and thousands of photography enthusiasts. Dodho magazine reserves the right to accept or reject any submitted project. Due to the large number of presentations received daily and the need to treat them with the greatest respect and the time necessary for a correct interpretation our average response time is around 5/10 business days in the case of being accepted. This is the information you need to start preparing your project for its presentation.
To send it, you must compress the folder in .ZIP format and use our Wetransfer channel specially dedicated to the reception of works. Links or projects in PDF format will not be accepted. All presentations are carefully reviewed based on their content and final quality of the project or portfolio. If your work is selected for publication in the online version, it will be communicated to you via email and subsequently it will be published.
Get in Touch
How can we help? Got an idea or something you'd like share? Please use the adjacent form, or contact contact@dodho.com
Thank You. We will contact you as soon as possible.