DnaEuropeInterview with Vicky Martin; published in our print edition #14

The initial inspiration for the cover photograph came from the Disney character Minnie Mouse however, the stereotype that is often placed on the female as being timid, much like a mouse, also filtered into my conception of the idea.

Magazine

CALL FOR ENTRIES

ENTRY DEADLINE: MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2020

HoursMinutesSeconds

Vicky Martin (UK) is an international award winning fine art professional photographer. Her first introduction to photography was whilst studying art and design at college in the 90s, she fell completely in love and found it to be a natural fit creatively, realising that this was what she wanted to do with her life she went on to dedicate her studying to photography.

She initially started out photographing in black and white but later moved on to color finding it to be a totally different way of photographing, and now tries to utilise the color in her photographs to benefit the overall narrative. Since 2008 after Vicky was awarded a prestigious bursary she has been developing her professional career in photography . Notably she has had her work published and exhibited nationally and internationally, from Europe to the USA in solo and group shows and her work continues to garner many awards and nominations most recently to include Portrait Photographer of The Year 2020 at the Minimalist Photography Awards, Finalist at the Lensculture Art Photography Awards 2019, Winner of the Professional Beauty and Fashion Category at the Chromatic Awards 2018, Winner of the All About Photo Magazine Colors issue 2018, Winner of the Single Image in the Professional Fine Art Category at the 12th Julia Margaret Cameron Awards 2018 and Winner of the Professional Fine Art Series at 2016 Fine Art Photography Awards. [Oficial Website][Print Edition][Digital edition]

Straight of the bat I would like to discuss the cover photo itself and how much it re- minded me of the works of YaYoi Kusama and her Polka dot pumpkins and large rooms, filled (wall to wall with polka dots). As a fine art photographer, do you take inspiration from artists like Kusama and various other pop artists in order to realize your own photographs?

Firstly, thank you for the compliment that you were reminded of such an iconic artist’s work! However, I do not look to other artists for inspiration. The inspiration for my created protagonists comes from literature, film or everyday life. The initial inspiration for the cover photograph came from the Disney character Minnie Mouse however, the stereotype that is often placed on the female as being timid, much like a mouse, also filtered into my conception of the idea. The motif of the polka dots I used in this photograph I can see as being visually similar to that used by Kusama but, my intention was to create a contrast between the black and the white that reinforces the juxtaposition between vul- nerability and strength.

The cover photograph for DODHO magazine is of course part of a much larger col- lection of images depicting several women with their eye’s covered. You stated that: ‘the viewer is inspired to make their own inferences about the subject’s persona’. I’d like to know if this model is playing a character that you created, and we as the audience are attempting to understand that character’s personality?

Within the series Selfhood, I want to challenge the viewer to emotionally connect with each portrait image without being able to see the eyes. Traditionally the viewer attempts to discover the emotion and feeling of an image by looking into the character/model’s eyes and, removing this conveyer of mood encourages the viewer to use their own experiences to inform their interpretation of the photograph. Without the ability to make eye contact with the character of each image, the viewer if forced, in a sense, to make eye contact with themselves – they are forced to look within themselves for the emotion they identify in the image. Thus, ultimately the character’s personality is informed by the viewer’s own personality and own perception of the context and themes that inform the image.

What I absolutely love about this collection is actually the very first image of the lady with the red hat. I think that even though it may appear to be a simple photograph, everything looks to have been coordinated and precisely considered. Could you tell us a bit about your thought process behind this image? Possibly what inspired you to create this shot?

I’m fascinated by colour and how this influences our response to an image, either as art or in life itself. The inspiration for this photograph came from the idea of how the colours of red and white are associated with traditional female stereo- types. White signifies purity, innocence and virginity, while red symbolises promiscuity, temptation, sin, and often also fertility. The white dress depicts the idea of the female body being perceived as needing to be ‘spotless’, yet the red gloves and the striped hat demonstrate the paradox of a woman being expected to conform to two juxtaposing ideals. The inability to see the woman’s face behind the hat evokes the idea of the female being invisible in society, lacking recognition as an individual, as they are valued only in terms of their sexuality and reproductive capacities. The idea of combining this symbolism with the title “Sunday Best”- which embodies the idea of wearing your best outfit to church on a Sunday – is a construct intended to invite reflection on the question of does what we wear define who we are, who are we trying to be, how are we perceived?

Moving on from ‘Selfhood’, your project titled ‘Not in Kansas’ breathes colour and has some very interesting contrasting colours. It’s almost as if each image doesn’t belong because of how saturated the colour is but when put together they really tell a story. Could you tell us what attracted you to the film The Wizard of Oz and its protagonist?

I fell in love with the story and film The Wizard of Oz from a very young age. The transition from sepia tones to the Technicolour paradise of Oz was the moment I found most memorable and poignant, which definitely influences the aesthetic and colour saturation I create in ‘Not in Kansas’. I also felt empowered by Dorothy as she was one of the first strong female characters I was introduced to who didn’t conform to the archetype of the damsel in distress waiting for a knight in shining arm to save her: she used her brain, courage and heart to save both herself and her friends. Throughout my series, I reference the film and story either through the use of colour, the iconic symbols immortalised by the film or the title of an image, however the struggle between fantasy and reality, paired with the need to find a sense of belong- ing, is what infuses each image and connects the series as a whole.

It seems as if you are quite fascinated with stories like ‘Alice in Wonderland’, ‘The Wizard of Oz’ as well as books like ‘Great Expectations’. Would you go as far as to say that your photographs serve as a bridge between the love that you share with these stories, (and their fantasy elements of course) and how well they can serve as tropes in highlighting current or personal issues?

I feel definitely that there are parallels between the themes which I like to explore with my work and those that are depicted in the aforementioned stories. I think that the female characters in particular inspired me (whether they are tenacious like Dorothy, curious like Alice or, haunted by the injustices of a patriarchal society like Miss Havisham) as they embody values and emotions that are, to a certain extent, universal to the female experience. I also like to reference such iconic figures in order to add further layers of meaning to my work: the dialogues and discourses that surround these stories inform the viewer’s perception of the colours, symbols, location etc. that I use and, provide an opportunity for multiple interpretations. Using such recognisable texts and films allows my work to be accessible for the viewer, as it provides a familiar vehicle through which to explore and raise questions about both contemporary issues (particularly those concerning gender) and personal issues (such as how a sense of identity is constructed and found) that I engage with in my work.

As a final question, let’s briefly talk about your relationship with nature. Of course, many of these photographs require weeks if not months of planning. Getting the location, actors/actresses, make-up and so on. However, do you feel that sometimes photographing outside is just as important. Achieving the correct location must be pivotal in establishing the relationships between the characters you are portraying and their narrative?

Constructed narratives involve a great deal of preparation and planning, which means that I particularly like to work in the controlled environment of the studio as time constraints become less of a pressure. However, as your question rightly suggests, the choice of location can be a pivotal part of the narrative of the series and, sometimes on outdoor setting is required to enhance the symbolism and meaning of an image. For example, my most recent completed series ‘Curiouser and Curiouser’ was photographed in Las Vegas, a modern-day Wonderland, that provides the backdrop for the protagonist to discover, struggle with, and eventually come to terms with her own feelings of not fitting in, the scale of which just would not have been achievable in a studio setting. Working on location also provokes a lot of improvisation and spontaneity, which can at times be pressurised due to time limits and weather issues, but also means you have to trust your gut instinct, which leads to some great shots that you had not necessarily planned for.



Legal Note: The photographer attest that have full authorization to give consent to the publication of these photos or project and have the authorization and permissions of third parties. Guarantees that you have all the necessary communications of property and you have obtained all the necessary authorizations for any property, buildings, architecture, structures or sculptures appearing in your photographs.

Francesco Scalici

Francesco Scalici

A recent MA graduate from the University of Lincoln, Francesco has now focused on landscape photography as the basis of his photographic platform. An author for DODHO magazine, Francesco’s interest in documentary photography has turned to writing and has had various articles, interviews and book reviews published on platforms such as: ‘All About Photo.com’, ‘Float Magazine’ and ‘Life Framer Magazine’. Currently on a photographic internship, Francesco has most recently been involved in the making of a short film titled: ‘No One Else’, directed by Pedro Sanchez Román and produced my Martin Nuza.

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/PH5.jpg

Get instant access to over 120 in-depth tutorials for all skill levels, the ability to stream anywhere from any mobile device, and access to our library.

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/captureDay.jpg
Share your most best images in this photo contest in collaboration with ViewBug. A community that hosts over 40 photo contests and challenges.
300x250

With ON1 Photo RAW you get the professional photo editing tools every photographer needs to get professional results while keeping your workflow.

https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Z.jpg

Simply Stunning Landscapes – Would you like to capture stunning landscapes every time you shoot… without having to travel far from home?

RELATED STORIES
Yolanda Garcia ; The chaos within simplicity

ConceptEuropeFeaturedYolanda Garcia ; The chaos within simplicity

Yolanda Garcia is a photographer who lives in Madrid. She has in a world of dreams, pain, laughter, and likes to externalize. She started in photography from she was a child, fiddling with cameras from their parents.
Water – Tomohide Ikeya

ConceptWater – Tomohide Ikeya

We thought human could control water if we had lots of equipments and cared for risks in water, but human never be able to live in water. And we also never be able to live without water.
Surreally by Nico Chiapperini

CityEuropeSurreally by Nico Chiapperini

My mum was a teacher in a primary school. I was eight years old when I went with her on a school trip to a Jurassic Park for children. There I took some pictures of fake dinosaurs with my father’s SLR. It was my first time and I used two rolls of film.
Doormen from Park Avenue New York City by Sam Golanski

CityEuropeDoormen from Park Avenue New York City by Sam Golanski

Between busy traffic and streams of yellow cabs at Park Avenue in Manhattan you can spot very dapper looking gents standing calmly at the entrances to multimillion condos of Upper East Side area of New York City.
https://www.dodho.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/insta.jpg
Calmness in Commotion by Matthieu Colnat

B&WEuropeNudeCalmness in Commotion by Matthieu Colnat

Ioi is very creative. Which was a good thing as we had a few ideas but we mostly improvised on spot. I usually don't work this way. But I wanted something fresh.
Architecture : Mihai Florea

CityOceaniaArchitecture : Mihai Florea

I consider myself a minimalist architectural and photographer with a desire to create abstract images from the reality surrounding me.
RANDOM STORIES
Living in Limbo by Biel Calderon

AsiaStoryLiving in Limbo by Biel Calderon

Thailand is a hot spot for urban refugees and asylum seekers. One of the reasons why the number keeps increasing is the relative easiness to enter the country.But the conditions of life awaiting them are far from the idyllic idea that some displaced people may build in their minds. 
Interview with Gili Yaari; Published in our print edition #01

AsiaDnaInterview with Gili Yaari; Published in our print edition #01

Gili Yaari is an Israel-based photojournalist specializing in documentary and news photography, covering daily issues all over Israel and in West Bank settlements including spot news, religious events, political and social issues.
Harmony by Maria Babikova

ConceptEuropeHarmony by Maria Babikova

The Harmony Series is a project deeply rooted in my personal history, started a year ago. The series are named after the school of rhythmic gymnastics-“Harmony”,where i spent most of my childhood.
Boneyard: 25 Years of Aircraft Graveyards at Night by Troy Paiva

AmericaConceptBoneyard: 25 Years of Aircraft Graveyards at Night by Troy Paiva

I’ve been using light painted, full moon-lit night photography to capture the abandoned American West for 25 years. Telling the story of the ghosts of America’s Western Expansion, from a post-wild west, post-Route 66, 21st Century perspective has become a never-ending source of inspiration.
Athos by Manol Valtchanov

EuropeStoryAthos by Manol Valtchanov

For more than a thousand years, the holy peninsula of Mount Athos in northern Greece is synonymous with the ultimate devotion to god for Orthodox men.
The Making of the Shiva by Abhishek Nandy

AsiaStoryThe Making of the Shiva by Abhishek Nandy

GAJAN is a hindu folk festival celebrated mostly in the Indian state of West Bengal and is associated with the worship of Lord Shiva.
The Faith of Life by Avishek Das

AsiaB&WStoryThe Faith of Life by Avishek Das

Gajan is a Hindu festival celebrated mostly in the Rural part of West Bengal. Gajan spans around a week, starting at the last week of Chaitra continuing till the end of the Bengali year. It ends with Charak Puja Participants of this festival is known as Sannyasi or Devotee .
The Anonymous Artists by Raju Peddada

AmericaDodhersThe Anonymous Artists by Raju Peddada

By what mechanism do I see beauty in decay or distress? Why does a defaced-distressed message incite me? And, how can defacement delineate the mundane mess, from aesthetic magic? The answers may reside in the cognitive theory, which, for the most part, is concerned with the development of an individual's thought process
Circus by Markku Lahdesmaki

EuropeStoryCircus by Markku Lahdesmaki

As a photographer, you always feel a little more aware of your surroundings than other people. After all, your livelihood depends on your eyes, on seeing things that other’s don’t.
FEATURED STORIES
Haenyeo; Grandma divers by Alain Schroeder

B&WEuropeFeaturedShotHaenyeo; Grandma divers by Alain Schroeder

South Korea, Jeju island, known for its characteristic basalt volcanic rock, sits off South Korea. It is the home of the renowned Haenyeo or women of the sea who free dive off the black shores of Jeju harvesting delicacies from the sea.
China; The great wall by Chiara Felmini

EuropeFeaturedStoryChina; The great wall by Chiara Felmini

China is almost a continent and as such can offer extremes and opposites at the same time; the ancient and very distant culture can still be observed in remote villages, increasingly surrounded by the advancing and swallowing civilization.
South Sudan; Smoker women by Ana Maria Robles

AmericaFeaturedShotSouth Sudan; Smoker women by Ana Maria Robles

These women smoke tobacco, an ancient custom that marks their ancestry, identity and tribal pride. Their attitude was strong. Fierce. They were active participants of every ceremony and the Leaders of the communities. 
Descendants of Samurai Ryotaro Horiuchi

AsiaFeaturedShotDescendants of Samurai Ryotaro Horiuchi

In the Soma region of Fukushima prefecture, there is a traditional Samurai festival called “Soma Nomaoi”, which is said to have continued for more than 1000 years.
François Mitterrand by Diego Goldberg

AmericaB&WFeaturedStoryFrançois Mitterrand by Diego Goldberg

I lived in France from 1976 to 1980. While there I had been covering the Socialist Party and when François Mitterrand decided to be a candidate again for the presidential elections I wrote him a letter with a project to document his campaign from the inside, with total access to his private and political activities.
Golden Gate; The Bridge, Reconstructed by Michael Yuan

AmericaCityFeaturedGolden Gate; The Bridge, Reconstructed by Michael Yuan

I wanted to challenge the perceptions of the Golden Gate Bridge. In solid red-orange and spanning 1.7 miles long, the Golden Gate Bridge is an icon of San Francisco.
The Orthogenesis of Soul by Sandipan Mukherjee

AsiaB&WConceptFeaturedThe Orthogenesis of Soul by Sandipan Mukherjee

We are all aware about the theory of biologically evaluation for Jean Baptist Lamarck. The theory tells about the evaluation of human how the structure of APE has got transferred to the today’s human being.
Protest in Brooklyn; Blessed to breathe by Bill Livingston

AmericaB&WFeaturedStoryProtest in Brooklyn; Blessed to breathe by Bill Livingston

When George Floyd’s life was unnecessarily and brutally snuffed out by Minneapolis law enforcement on May 25, it was yet another final straw…and that straw was set ablaze around the globe.
Photographs; North Carolina State Fair by Avery Danziger

AmericaCityFeaturedPhotographs; North Carolina State Fair by Avery Danziger

I have been photographing the North Carolina State Fair since the early 70's. One of my oldest memories was the yearly outing of my family going to the State Fair in North Carolina, starting when I was 6 year old.... 
OTHER STORIES
X
stay in touch
Join our mailing list and we'll keep you up to date with all the latest stories, opportunities, calls and more.
We use Sendinblue as our marketing platform. By Clicking below to submit this form, you acknowledge that the information you provided will be transferred to Sendinblue for processing in accordance with their terms of use
We’d love to
Thank you for subscribing!
Submission
Dodho Magazine accepts submissions from emerging and professional photographers from around the world.
Their projects can be published among the best photographers and be viewed by the best professionals in the industry and thousands of photography enthusiasts. Dodho magazine reserves the right to accept or reject any submitted project. Due to the large number of presentations received daily and the need to treat them with the greatest respect and the time necessary for a correct interpretation our average response time is around 5/10 business days in the case of being accepted.
- Between 10/30 images of your best images, in case your project contains a greater number of images which are part of the same indivisible body of work will also be accepted. You must send the images in jpg format to 1200px and 72dpi and quality 9. (No borders or watermarks)
- A short biography along with your photograph. (It must be written in the third person)
- Title and full text of the project with a minimum length of 300 words. (Texts with lesser number of words will not be accepted)
This is the information you need to start preparing your project for its presentation
To send it, you must compress the folder in .ZIP format and use our Wetransfer channel specially dedicated to the reception of works. Links or projects in PDF format will not be accepted. All presentations are carefully reviewed based on their content and final quality of the project or portfolio. If your work is selected for publication in the online version, it will be communicated to you via email and subsequently it will be published.
Issue #14 | September 2020
Current Issue
Vicky Martin
Ryotaro Horiuchi
Susanne Mildeelberg
Diego Bardone
Nicky Hamilton
Alain Schroeder
Printed on 80# matte paper 22x28cm | 100 Pages
Showroom
September 7 to October 31, 2020
Julia Fullerton-Batten
LOOKING OUT FROM WITHIN
Get in touch
How can we help? Got an idea or something you'd like share? Please use the adjacent form, or contact contact@dodho.com
Thank You. We will contact you as soon as possible.
Dodho Magazine is pleased to announce the new call for the photographers selection from all over the world that will be presented in an exceptional edition.
Deadline: Monday, November 30, 2020
Photo by ©Ryotaro Horiuchi | Japan | Issue#14
Dodho Magazine is pleased to announce the new call for the photographers selection from all over the world that will be presented in an exceptional edition.
Deadline: Monday, November 30, 2020
Photo by ©Ryotaro Horiuchi | Japan | Issue#14
CALL
FOR ENTRIES
Dodho Magazine is pleased to announce the new call for the photographers selection from all over the world that will be presented in an exceptional edition.
Are you ready?
Deadline: Monday, November 30, 2020
Contact
How can we help? Got an idea or something you'd like share? Please use the adjacent form, or contact contact@dodho.com
Thank You. We will contact you as soon as possible.
Submission
Dodho Magazine accepts submissions from emerging and professional photographers from around the world.
Their projects can be published among the best photographers and be viewed by the best professionals in the industry and thousands of photography enthusiasts. Dodho magazine reserves the right to accept or reject any submitted project. Due to the large number of presentations received daily and the need to treat them with the greatest respect and the time necessary for a correct interpretation our average response time is around 5/10 business days in the case of being accepted. This is the information you need to start preparing your project for its presentation.
To send it, you must compress the folder in .ZIP format and use our Wetransfer channel specially dedicated to the reception of works. Links or projects in PDF format will not be accepted. All presentations are carefully reviewed based on their content and final quality of the project or portfolio. If your work is selected for publication in the online version, it will be communicated to you via email and subsequently it will be published.
NEW!
FOLLOW US.
Subscribe now and get a free access to a curated list of resources.
Feel free to contact.
2017 (C) All rights reserved.
ghfd